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B 49418 4 _ 

ANNUAL REPORTS. WAR DEPARTMENT J 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1920 /^ •^ 

-#y^ 



REPORT OF THE 

GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO 

TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR 

1920 




WASHINGTON 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1920 



DOCUMENTS 

N. Y. p. L. 

JULY 1932 

32704U 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Report of the governor of Porto Rico 1 

Introduction 1 

External commerce 7 

Legislation 23 

Executive 23 

Proclamations 23 

Pardons and paroles 24 

Health and sanitation 24 

Public asylums , 25 

Insane asylum 25 

Blind asylum 26 

Charitable institutions 26 

Insular })oard of health 27 

Institute of tropical medicine and hygiene 27 

Insular police 28 

( 'ivil-service commission 28 

Board of medical examination 29 

Board of pharmacy 29 

Board of trustees of the University of Porto Rico • 30 

Board of trustees of the Carnegie Library 30 

Insular government finance 31 

Outstanding bonded indebtedness 33 

Municipalities 34 

Education 34 

Agriculture and labor 36 

Auditing and accounting 38 

Public works 38 

Roads and bridges 38 

Buildings 39 

Public lands 40 

Insular telegraph 40 

Harbors and docks 40 

Irrigation district 41 

Justice 42 

Penal institution and reform schools 43 

P'ranchises 44 

Personnel 44 

Workmen's relief commission 44 

Public service commission 45 

Insular board of elections 48 

(Conclusion , 48 

Appendixes 49 

Appendix I. Exhibits to the report of the governor 51 

Appendix II. Report of the executive secretary of Porto Rico 76 

Appendix III. Report of the commissioner of health 114 

Appendix IV. Report of the auditor, and consolidated financial exhibits.. 182 

Appendix V. Report of the treasurer 295 

Appendix VI. Report of the commissioner of the interior 341 

Appendix VII. Report of the commissioner of education 415 

Appendix VIII. Report of the attorney general 467 

Appendix IX. Report of the commissioner of agriculture and labor 503 

Appendix X. Report of the insular board of elections. 567 

III 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OP 

THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Government House, 
San Juan, P. R., September 30, 1920. ' 

Sir: Pursuant to law, I have the honor to submit the following 
report of the Governor of Porto Rico covering the fiscal vear ended 
June 30, 1920. 

Introduction. 

In this, my seventh annual report, I have the honor to state that 
the period covered by this report has been for Porto Rico a year of 
extraordinary prosperity and peaceful progress. The work of read- 
justment and reconstruction after the great World War has gone 
forward slowly but surely. This work has been greatly affected and 
retarded by the destruction of buildings caused by the earthquake, 
by the high cost of all the materials and other articles of commerce 
and the difficulties of transportation as well as by numerous strikes 
amongst the workingmen; but real progress has been made of a defi- 
nite and substantial nature. The most important of the strike move- 
ments as judged from their effects upon commerce and industry were 
as follows: (1) The strike involving all the workers of the American 
Railroad Co., which completely paralyzed the traffic of the railroad 
for about three weeks, ending by agreement December 25. (2) A 
widespread strike among the workers in the cane fields which covered 
practically the whole island, and lasted with more or less intensity for 
several weeks, from January until April 20. This strike involved 
many thousands of laborers and during its progress some cane fields 
were set on fire and other regrettable disorders occurred, but consider- 
ing the extent of the movement, there was less violence and disorder 
than might have been expected. It was finally settled by negotia- 
tions and concessions early in March. (3) A strike among the steve- 
dores in San Juan and other cities beginning in May and lasting with 
diminishing intensity for some weeks. The two firstrmentioned 
strikes though costly and difficult not only to the parties immediately 
involved, but to the general public, nevertheless resulted in sul)- 
stantial increases of wages to the workers. The last one failed. 

As stated above, however, the general prosperity of the island has 
been most remarkable and this has includea all the industries and 
every form of business with the possible exception of the citrus-fruit 

f rowers, who were unfortunately gravely injured by the tie-up of the 
oats in October and November due to the strike oi the stevedores in 
New York harbor. The widespread increase in wages enabled the 
laboring classes generally to share in the prosperity. 



2 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

The harbor dredging long planned and long deferred was pushed 
with all possible energy throughout the year and all the difficulties 
were one after another disposed of by the War Department in coop- 
eration with the governor. After the close of the fiscal year, the work 
of dredging was actually begun, though it will probably require three 
or four years to comjplete the large project. The contemplated 
dredging will increase the anchorage area available for ships drawing 
30 feet of water 12 times, and about 2,000,000 square meters of swamp 
land lying between the harbor and the city will be reclaimed. For 
the final stages of the initiation of this great project, we are much 
indebted to the personal interest of the present Secretary of War. 

The people of the island were much gratified in December of the past 
year to have a visit of the Secretary of War, Hon. Newton D. Baker, 
accompanied by Mi*s. Baker, as well as the Chief of Staff and the 
Inspector General of the Army. While the stay of the distinguished 
party in Porto Rico was very short, both the people and the govern- 
ment of the island manifested in every way possible their apprecia- 
tion of the honor of this visit and the pleasure which they derived 
from personal acquaintance with the head of the War Department. 

The law for the reorganization of the Army authorized the change 
of the status of the Provisional Porto Rico Regiment, which has often 
been requested. It is now known as the Sixty-fifth Regiment of In- 
fantry in the Regular Army and its officers have been and will be 
hereafter promoted in accordance with the regulations applicable to 
all the officers of the Army. 

The organization of the National Guard of Porto Rico has made 
successful and rapid progress since the necessary legislation was passed 
by Congress authorizing this important feature of our preparation 
for national defense. In the brief time that has elapsed one complete 
regiment of infantry has been organized and recognized, and is only 
awaiting the coming of the necessary eciuipmont to enter the first 
annual encampment. Although Porto Rico had heretofore had no 
national guard organization whatever, it was nevertheless among the 
very first of the wStates and Territories to respond to the opportunity 
for this form of service and is now ready to enlarge its organization 
whenever the opportunity is offered. 

The work in Porto Rico of the Fourteenth Decennial Census was 
successfully carried out in January, 1920. The methods and machin- 
ery used were much the same as those of the previous census, modified 
somewhat by changed conditions and the lessons of experience. The 
figures as to population are the only ones thus far announced, and 
these w^ere announced with remarkable promptness because, as stated 
by the Director of the Census, of the cordial cooperation of the Gov- 
ernment and people of Porto Rico in the work of organizing the force 
and gathering the statistics. The population figures are of the 
greatest interest. The total population as enumerated in 1920 is 
1,297,772, an increase of 179,760 in the 9i years that have elapsed 
since the previous census, and an increase of 344,579 since the first 
census taken by the American administration in 1899. The last cen- 
sus taken by the Spanish Government was that of 1887, when the 
total population was announced to be 798,565. During the last 22 
years of^the Spanish regime the population increased 221,595, or 
30 per cent. During the 21 years of the American Government it has 
increased 344,579, or 36 per cent. In the Spanish period the average 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 6 

increase was 1.36 per cent peryear. In the American period it has 
been 1.71 per cent per year. The most significant thing about these 
figures is that the population of Porto Kico has been increasing 
steadily and rapidly for the past 43 years under both the Spanish 
and American admmistrations until now it has reached the tremen- 
dous average of 377.8 per square mile. Even as it stands to-day this 
is an enormous population for an island situated as is Porto Rico, 
almost entirely without large cities supported by manufacturing 
industries, and so largely dependent upon agriculture for the employ- 
ment of its people. But when we consider that this population, 
already so great, is still steadily and rapidly increasing, the problemi 
of raising the standard of living, or even finding employment for all 
the people, will soon become a social question of the greatest urgency 
and difficulty. 

Owing to some important amendments that were urgently required 
in some of the tax laws and other necessary legislation a special ses- 
sion of the legislature was called by the acting governor to meet on 
April 26, 1920. 

The body met pursuant to the call and remained in session 10 days. 
Some very important and useful legislation was enacted, which is 
described and explained elsewhere in this report. 

Commercial business was active and growmg throughout the year. 

Both the proof and the cause of this may be seen in the unprece- 
dented volume of the external trade. The increase in money value 
of both exports and imports was so extraordinary that is seems almost 
incredible. The total exports were $150,811,449, an increase of about 
90 per cent over that of the year previous, and about $70,000,000 
more than the highest record for all previous years. The imports also 
broke all previous records, reaching a total of $96,388,534. This is 
about 50 per cent greater than that of the previous or of any previous 
year. The total external trade, therefore, of the island during the 
last fiscal year was $247,199,983, an increase of 74 per cent over the 
figures for last year, which were the highest on record. The value of 
the exports exceeded that of imports by $54,422,915, twice as much 
as in any previous year. The balance of trade has bieen in favor of 
the island continuously since 1907 and the total amount of these trade 
balances for the last 13 years is $188,858,986, which is more than 
70 per cent of the total assessment of all the property of the island. 

All of these figures connected with the external trade of the island 
are so astonishing and the increases so extraordinary that it is inter- 
esting to examine them somewhat in detail. As was expected, the 
greatest part of the increase in exports was in the item of sugar, due 
to the unprecedented high prices which prevailed in that article 
throughout the year. The exportation of sugar increased largely in 
(quantity and more than doubled in value, reaching 419,388 short tons 
in quantity and $98,923,750 in value. These figures include, of 
course, the large hang over from the crop of the previous year, which 
was sold early m the fiscal year at much lower prices than those which 
prevailed during the winter and spring. This explains in part the 
relatively low average price,' which was less than 12 cents per pound 
for the whole year. 

Difficulties m shipping due to the stevedores' strike in May and 
June reduced the exports of sugar for the year and will undoubtedly 
increase the hang over for next year. - 



4 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

But although the last year was a great sugar year, sugar was not 
the whole story. Other articles played an important part in rolling 
up the large increase in exports. 

The total exportations of these other articles was $51,887,699, an 
increase of $20,483,458 over the total for the previous year, or 62 
per cent. 

Coffee, for the first time since the American occupation, exceeded 
$9,000,000 in the value of its exports, reaching $9,034,028. 

This was due entirely to the high price, for the crop was short, 
totaling only 32,776,754 pounds, the smallest crop, with two excep- 
tions, since 1905. 

Tobacco leaf and scrap exported increased by $3,995,805, reaching 
a total of $12,416,388, the highest figure on record. Never before 
1918 have the exports of tobacco much exceeded $3,000,000. Cigars 
ncreased by $5,548,424, reaching the total value of $11,613,997, also 
making a new record. Coconuts increased by $372,103 over the total 
for the previous year, which was the highest on record. Citrus fruits 
and pineapples increased by $653,354 over last year's figures in spite 
of the early shipping difficulties already mentioned. There were also 
important increases over the totals for the previous year in cotton, 
alcohol, and straw hats. The only important decreases were in three 
articles, namely, molasses, honey, and bay rum. 

Turning now to imports we see the same astonishing enlargement 
of the island's trade, especially in the imports from the United States, 
and in such articles of necessary consumption as foodstuffs, clothing, 
fertilizer, manufactures of iron, steel, leather, rubber, etc. Food- 
stuffs alone totaled nearly $37,852,134, a large increase over the 
previous year both in volume and value. Clothing and shoes, as 
shown in the large increases in the manufactures of cotton, leather, 
silk, and wool, were far more liberally imported in 1920 than in 1919, 
due no doubt to the increase in the purchasing power of the people 
caused by the enormous exports. 

The people therefore were, in general, better fed and better clothed, 
notwithstanding the high prices of all the prime necessities of life. 

All of the internal business of the island has followed in the wake 
of the large external trade and seems to be growing and in a state of 
general prosperity. During the year 70 new corporations, with a 
total authorized capital stock of $12,756,000 and a total paid-in 
capital of $1,152,110 to begin with, were organized. This is the 
largest number organized in any fiscal year since the new corpora- 
tion law went into effect in 1902. In addition to these domestic 
corporations, 14 new foreign corporations were authorized to transact 
business in Porto Rico during the year with total authorized capital 
stock of $39,296,200. These figures represent an increase in the 
number of new corporations, domestic and foreign, of 15 above the 
figures for the previous year and illustrate the increase of capital and 
the general expansion of business. In their purposes they cover 
almost every sort of business. 

In addition to these new corporations, there were registered during 
the year 188 trade-marks, an increase of 98 per cent over the previous 
year and 268 per cent over the year 1917-18. 

There were also organized 38 associations under the nonpecuniary 
association act for a great variety of purposes. Fifteen of these were 
for the development of agriculture along cooperative lines and con- 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. O 

nected with the movement initiated and fostered by the department 
of agriculture for the formation and development of farmers' leagues, 
mentioned elsewhere in this report. 

According to the report of the treasurer there has been a notable 
increase and extension of the insurance business during the past year. 
Several new companies have entered the business, American, foreign 
and local; many new lines of insurance have been undertaken; and 
the total business has been wonderfully extended. All this has sug- 
gested to the treasury department that the present insurance laws 
of Porto Rico are inadequate and insufficient for the proper safe- 
guarding of all policyholders and the development of the business. 
A new insurance law has therefore been drawn by the treasurer and 
will be presented to the next legislature. 

The bureau of weights and measures reports improvement in the 
general spirit of compliance with the regulations of the bureau with 
reference to accuracy in scales and other instruments of measurement. 
Special attention was given to the weighing of sugar cane delivered 
by colonos to the centrals, a species of business in which accuracy 
is exceedingly difficult and fraud very easy to practice, hard to dis- 
cover, and still harder to punish. 

The banks of the island, as can be seen by examining the consoli- 
dated statement published in the treasurer's report, have shown 
themselves not only to be safe and conservative, but also capable of 
increasing their capital and facilities for the accommodation of a 
great and growing business. In addition to the three new banks 
reported in 1918-19, one other new bank was organized and opened 
last year, namely, the Banco Agricola de Aguadilla, with a capital 
stock of $100,000. 

Large increases of the capital stock of some of the older banks were 
also made during the year. At the end of the fiscal year there was 
reported an increase in the aggregate deposits of all the recognized 
banking institutions of more than $18,000,000 over the figures of the 
previous year, which were the largest ever recorded. 

There was also an increase over the figures of the previous year in 
the aggregate loans of $13,532,910, in the capital stock paid in of 
$867,116, m the surplus and undivided profits of $455,962, in the cash 
reserve of $6,036,125, and in the net balances due from other banks 
of $1,260,360. 

The extent to which the banks of Porto Rico have expanded and 
developed their business in the past three years may be seen in the 
f ollowmg comparative table of figures : 



1917 



1920 



Number of banks 

Capital stock 

Surplus and undivided profits. . 

Aggregate deposits 

Aggregate loans 

Cash reserve 

Net balance from banks 

Net balance due to banks 



11 
$2,316,842.48 
1,040,473.74 
22,394,165.81 
11,267,351.94 
6,899,858.42 
5,820,584.22 



17 
$3,957,352.65 
1,722,168.40 
47,235,811.04 
38,673,832.11 
12,476,935.71 



1,963,276.20 



This is one evidence of the large growth in commerce and business 
in this island the last three years. 

The division of forestry has been actually organized and at work 
during the whole of the fiscal year, though somewhat hampered by 



6 REPORT OF THE bOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

the difficulty of securing and holding the services of technical men. 
The present personnel consists of 3 technical foresters, 2 forest in- 
spectors, and 3 forest guards. 

During the year under review in December, 1919, the governor by 
proclamation added about 25,000 cuerdas of public lands to the 
insular forest reserves, which together with the 15,000 cuerdas of 
mangrove swamp lands proclaimed the previous year make a total 
of about 40,000 cuerdas of insular forests. This is in addition to the 
Luquillo National Forest, which contains approximately 15,000 
cuerdas. Both the national and insular forests are under the man- 
agement of the same chiel forester, and of the entire acreage of 
55,000 cuerdas only about 20,000 cuerdas are actually covered by 
forest growth of any importance. What there was on the other 
lands has practically all been swept away. However, the work of 
protecting and developing what is left has been begun with results 
that already begin to show, and the more difficult and tedious matter 
of reforestation on the denuded lands will be carefully studied. 

The outstanding features in the work of education during the 
past year were the large increase in the total expenditures for educa- 
tional purposes, and the rural census voluntarily undertaken by the 
department of education for the purpose of accurately ascertaining 
the true conditions as to education throughout the rural barrios of 
the whole island and also to stimulate the interest in education and 
the attendance of the children in these barrios. This census, although 
not entirely complete because of the necessary omission of a few 
remote barrios in which no schools have as yet been opened, consti- 
tutes the first real survey of school conditions in the rural territory 
of the island as a whole. A large amount of useful and accurate 
information has been secured and filed for reference relating to 
nearly all the -barrios, and in addition other excellent results have 
been accomplished. 

There was a large increase in the expenditures for educational 
purposes, namely, $683,058 over those of the previous year. A large 
part of this no doubt was employed in the increased salaries, paid to 
teachers, but better work was secured and the entire system of 
schools was enlarged and improved. 

The total enrollment was increased by 24,197 pupils, and 302 more 
teachers were employed than the year before. 

The health authorities are j)leased to report that no epidemic of 
any sort visited the island during the past year. Perhaps the most 
encouraging event of the year in this department was the visit to 
the island of the commission sent by the Rockefeller Foundation to 
make a study of the health conditions of the whole island. This 
commission, consisting of Drs. Grant and Heiser, made a special 
survey of the situation as to uncinariasis, malaria, and tuberculosis, 
which next to infant mortality are the three most important factors 
in the death rate of Porto Rico. Valuable advice and suggestions 
were freely offered by these experts and also generous financial aid 
on the part of the Foundation was tendered under conditions that 
ought to be and it is hoped will be met. The death rate was reduced 
to 23.33 per thousand, the lowest in four years, but still higher than 
it should be in so salubrious an island. Gratifying progress was 
made during the year in securing private contributions and construct- 
ing the buildings of the new antituberculosis hospital at Rio Piedras. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



EXTERNAL COMMERCE. 

The value of imports and exports during the fiscal year 1919-20 
aggregated $247,199,983, an increase of $105,303,583 over the pre- 
vious year, which was a record year. Imports were valued at 
$96,388,534, representing an increase of $33,988,174 as compared 
with the year 1918-19, and exports valued at $150,811,449 showed a 
gain of $71,315,409. 

The following tables indicate the relative values and quantities of 
imports and exports during the fiscal year 1918-19, and previous 
years : 



Table No. 1. — Merchandise shipped from Porto Rico to the United States and foreign 

countries. 



Years. 


To the 
United 
States. 


To foreign 
countries. 


Total. 


Years. 


To the 
United 
States. 


To foreign 
countries. 


Total. 


1901 


$5,581,288 
8,378,766 
11,051,195 
11,722,826 
15, ()33, 145 
19,142,461 
22, 070, 133 
25,891,281 
26,394,312 
32,095,645 


$3,002,679 
4,055,190 
4,037,884 
4,543,077 
3,076,420 
4,115,069 
4, 926, 167 
4,753,209 
3, 996, 913 
5,864,574 


$8,583,967 
12,433,956 
15,089,079 
16,265,903 
18,709,565 
23,257,530 
26,996,300 
30,644,490 
30,391,225 
37,960,219 


1911 


$34,765,409 
42,873,401 
40,538,623 
34,423,180 
42,311,920 


$5,152,958 
6,832,012 
8,564,942 
8,679,582 
7.044.987 


$39,918,367 
49,705,413 
49,103,565 
43, 102, 762 
49,356,907 


1902 


1912 


1903 


1913 


1904 


1914 


1905 


1915 


1906 


1916 


60,952,768 ! 5.778 805 


66,731,573 
80,970,917 
74,294,022 
79,496,040 
150,811,449 


1907 


1917 


73,115,224 
65,514,989 
71,015,351 
133,207,508 


7, 855, 693 
8,779,033 
8, 480, 689 
17,603,941 


1908 


1918 


1909. . . . 


1919 


1910 


1920 







Table No. 2. — Merchandise shipped into Porto Rico from the United States and foreign 

countries. 



Years. 


I rom the 
1 United 
, States. 


From 

foreign 

countries. 


Total. 


Years. 


From the 
United 

States. 


.From 

foreign 

countries. 


Total. 


1901 


..' $6,965,408 
-. 10,882,653 
.. 12,245,845 
.. 11,210,069 
-. 13,974,070 
.. 19,224,881 
.. 25,686,285 
.. 22,677,376 
. . 23,618,545 
.- 27,097,654 


$1,952,728 
2,326,957 
2, 203, 441 
1,958,960 
2,562,189 
2, 602, 784 
3,580,887 
3, 148, 289 
2, 925, 781 
3, 537, 201 


$8, 918, 136 
13, 209, 610 
14,449,286 
13,169,029 
16,536,259 
21,827,665 
29,267,172 
25, 825, 665 
26,544,326 
30,634,855 


1911 


$34,671,598 
38,470,963 
33,155,005 
32,568,368 
30,929,831 
35,892,515 
49,539,249 
58, 945, 758 
57,898,085 
90,724,259 


$4,115,039 
.4,501,928 
3,745,057 
3,838,419 
2,954,465 
3,058,641 
4,005,975 
4, 443, 524 
4, 502, 275 
5,664,275 


$38, 786, 997 
42,972,891 
36,900,062 
36,406,787 
33,884,296 
38,951,156 


1902 


1912 


1903 


1913 


1904 

1905 


1914 

1915 


1906 


1916 


1907 


1917 


53,545,224 
63,389,282 
62,400,360 
96,388,534 


1908 


1918 


1909 

1910 


1919 

1920 



Table No. 3. 



-Merchandise shipped into and from Porto Rico in trade with the United 

States. 



Years. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Total trade 

with 

United 

States. 


Years. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Total trade 

with 

United 

States. 


1901 


$6,965,408 

10. 882. 653 
12, 245, 845 
11,210,069 
13,974,070 
19,224,881 
25,686,285 
22,677,376 
23, 618, 545 

27. 097. 654 


$5,581,288 
8,378,766 
11,051,195 
11,722,826 
15,633,145 
19,142,461 
22,070,133 
25,891,281 
26,394,312 
32, 095, 645 


$12, 546, 696 
19,261,419 
23,297,040 
22,932,895 
29,607,215 
38,367,342 
47,756,418 
48,568,657 
50,012,857 
59,193,299 


1911 


$34,671,958 
38,470,963 
33,155,005 
32,568,368 
30,929,831 
35,892,515 
49, 539, 249 
58, 945, 758 
57, 989, 085 
90,724,259 


$34,765,409 
42,873,401 
40,538,623 
34,423,180 
42,311,920 
60, 952, 768 
73,115,224 
65,514,989 
71,015,351 

133,207,508 


$69,437,3)7 
81,344,364 
73, 693, 628 


1902 


1912 


1903 


1913 


1904 


1914 


66,991,548 


1905 


1915 


73,241,751 
96,845,283 


1906 


1916 


1907 


1917 


122,654,473 
124,460,747 
128,913,436 


1908 


1918 


1909 


1919 


1910 


1920 


223,931,767 







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



CHART SHOWING COMPARATIVE TOTAL EXTERNAL 
TRADE WITH THE UNITED STATES & FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
FROM 1901-1920. 



IN MILLIONS or DOLLARS 

With the United State* | 

With the ForeigQ CouQtnes 



4. 
i 



^ 



W", 



P 



■isa 






REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 


4,— Merchandise shipped into and from Porto Rico in trade with foreign 
countries. 


Years. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Total 
foreign 
trade. • 


Years. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Total, 
foreign 
trade. 


1901 


$1,952,728 
2,326,957 

O 005 AAl 


$3,002,679 
4,055,190 
4,037,884 
4,543,077 
3,076,420 
4,115,069 
4,926,167 
4,753,209 
3,996,913 
5,864,574 


$4,955,407 
6,382,147 
6,241,325 
6,502,037 
5,638,609 
6,717,853 
8,507,054 
7,901,498 
6,922,694 
9,401,775 


1911 


$4,115,039 
4,501,928 
3,745,057 
3,838,419 

. 2,954,465 
3,058,641 
4,005,975 
4,443,524 
4,502,275 
5,664,275 


$5,152,958 
6,832,012 
8,564,942 
8,679,582 
7,044,987 
5,778,805 
7,855,693 
8,779,033 
8,480,689 

17,603,941 


$9,267,997 


1902 


1912 


11,333,940 


1903 


1913 


12,309,999 
12,518,001 
9,999,452 
8,837,446 
11,861,668 
13,222,557 
12,982,964 
23,268,216 


1Q04 1 T' 958' 960 


1914 


1905 ! 2,562,189 

1906 i 2,602,784 

1907 : 3,580,887 

1908 ' 3,148,289 

1909 ' 2,925,781 

191Q ' ^ M7 oni 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 . . 


1919 


1920 . . . 




"'""•'""^ 





Table No. 5.- 



-Statement showing annual trade balance resulting from the commerce 
between Porto Rico and other ports. 





Imports. 


Exports. 


Balance. 


Fiscal years. 


In favor of 
the island. 


Against 
the island. 


1901 


$8,918,136 
13,209,610 
14,449,286 
13,169,029 
16,536,259 
21,827,665 
29,267,172 
25,825,665 
26,544,326 
30,634,855 
38,786,997 
42,972,891 
36,900,062 
36,406,787 
33,884,296 
38, 951, 156 
53, 545, 224 
63,389,282 
62,400,360 
96,388,534 


$8,583,967 
12,433,956 
15,089,079 
16,265,903 
18,709,565 
23,257,530 
26,996,300 
30,644,490 
30,391,225 
37,960,219 
39,918,367 
49,705,413 
49,103,565 
43,102,762 
49,356,907 
66,731,573 
80,970,917 
74,294,022 
79,496,040 
150,811,449 




$334, 169 


1902 . . 




775,654 


1903 . . 


$639,793 
3,096,874 
2,173,306 
1,429,865 


1904 




1905 




1906 




1907 


2,270,872 


1908 


4,818,825 
3,846,899 
7,325,364 
1,131,370 
6,732,522 
12,203,503 
6,695,975 
15,472,611 
27,780,417 
27,425,693 
10,904,740 
17,095,680 
54,422,915 


1909 




1910 




1911 




1912 




1913 




1914 .... . . 




1915 




1916 




1917 




1918 




1919 




1920 









Breadstuff amountng to $21,565,029 were imported during the 
year, of which $21,461,350 came from the United States and $103,679 
from foreign countries. These figures show an increase of $4,213,919 
over the preceding year. The principal items were 'rice, valued at 
$14,194,688, and wheat flour, at $5,110,710, representing increases 
of $2,073,022 and $746,918 over the previous year. 

Importations of cotton goods jumped up $10,898,3^^3, from $7,122,- 
932 in 1917-18 to $18,021,275 this year; cars and carriages, valued at 
$2,372,228, showed an increase of $1,126,088; fertilizers, valued 
$3,573,248, increased $1,574,699; iron and steel manufactures, $5,228,- 
955, increased $1,284,546; leather goods, $3,918,335, showed an in- 
crease of $2,137,941; meat, $6,887,519, increased $2,063,702. Dairy 
products imported from the United States, valued at $1,624,603, 
show an increase of $409,173 over the previous year, and. from foreign 
countries a raise of $151,741, from $19,808 in 1918-19 to $171,549 
in 1919-20. The value of jute bags imported from the United States 
shows an increase of $80,363. Importations of fish and fish products 
from the United States increased by $449,691 and from foreign 
countries by $671,355. The importation of beans and dried peas 
from the United States were valued at $1,589,303 and from foreign 



10 



REPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



countries $10,712, aggregating $1,600,015, an increase of $522,953 
over the total of the previous year. 

The increase in purchases of breadstuffs was due chiefly to in- ' 
creased quantity. Bread and biscuits increased from 1,153,635 
pounds in 1918-19 to 4,062,818 pounds in 1919-20. In the case of 
rice the increase was due to rise in price because the figures for im- 
ports show a decrease of 21,620,800 pounds in quantity. 

In cotton goods there was an increase of 22,260,267 yards over the 
figures of the preceding, year. 

Fertilizers also showed an increase of 28,270 tons. 

Table No. 6. — Merchandise brought into Porto Rico from the United States and foreign 
countries during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920. 



Articles. 



Merchandise from 
United States. 



Quantity. Value 



4,002,818 

70, 050 

111,211 

449, ()91 



Agricultural implements 

Animals • 

Breadstuffs: 

Bread and biscuits pounds . . 

Cornmeal barrels. . 

Oats bushels- . 

Wheat flour .• barrels. . 

Rice pounds-. 133,449,140 

All other 

Candles pounds. . 7, 057, 241 

Cars, carriages, and parts of. 

Cement, hydraulic barrels. . i 213, 685 

Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines 

Coal tons.. 85,894 

Cocoa and chocolate, jprepared 

Cotton, manufactures of: 

Cloths yards..' 50,528,863 

All other articles 

Earthen, stone, and china ware 

Explosives 

Fertilizers tons. .1 44, 921 

Fber, vegetable and textile grasses, manufactures of: i 

Cordage pounds. .| 1,351,363 

Jute bags ! 

Another ' 

Fish: I 

Dried, smoked, or cured pounds. . 16, 642, 917 

All other : 

Fruits and nuts ; 

G lass and glassware i 

India rubber, manufectures of. i 

Instruments and apparatus for scientific purposes { 

Iron and steel, manufactures of. 

Leather and manufactures of ' 

Meat and dairy products: | 

Meat products- 
Bacon, hams, and shoulders, cured . . .pounds. 

Pork, pickled, etc do 

Lard do.... 

Lard compounds and substitutes for lard, 

pounds I 5,984,148 

An other meat products | 



3,009,709 
"8,738,768 
5,384,030 



Dairy products- 
Butter pounds. 

Cheese do... 

Milk, condensed or evaporated do . . . 

Musical instruments and parts of. 

Oils: 

Mineral gallons. 

Vegetable 

Paints, pigments, and varnishes 

Paper, manufactures of. 

Perfumeries, cosmetics, and toilet preparations 

Seeds 



855,529 
1,832,643 
4,104,734 



7,063,704 



Silk, manufactures oL 

Soap: 

Toilet or fancy 

All other pounds. 

Spirits, distilled proof gallons. 

Sugar, sefined povmds. . 

Straw and palm leaf, manufactures of. 



13,063,989 



1,262,033 



$297, 995 
48,232 

1,041,257 
582,319 
113,050 

5,110,710 

14,194,688 

419,326 

182,643 

2,372,228 
601,041 

1,634,370 
585, 527 
234,345 

11,385,854 

6, 519, 269 

322, 823 

19,766 

3,110,388 

336,710 
494,011 
191,710 

1,618,404 
443,320 
440,979 
307,236 

1,312,232 
74,836 

5,200,029 

3,837,933 



747,352 
1,979,054 
1,603,132 

1,547,918 
942,886 

366,605 
614,951 
643,047 
71,050 

2,223,285 
318,045 
535,061 

1,562,895 
338,030 



Merchandise^ from 
foreign countries. 



Quantity. Value, 



813,956 

121,772 
1,124,915 



126,868 
189,741 



5,164 



12,745,754 



1,792 



107,074 
164,091 



18,412,322 



193 
825 



$142, 593 

74,827 



75,683 1 

1 


30,285 


1 


343 j 


4,288 




()9, 106 






i 



150, 613 
2,218 

74 

226 

115,926 

3,618 



462, 860 



495,576 
21,528 

1,419,898 

35,808 

118,702 

3,506 

47 



28,926 
80,402 



1,236 



65,941 

108,885 
62,664 



3,942 

354,928 

135,507 

1,393 

56,547 

20,976 

4,300 

2,807 

9,932 



3,430 

91 

8,577 



BEPOBT OF THE GOVERl^OB OF PORTO RICO. 



11 



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12 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 6. — Merchandise brought into Porto Rico from the United States and foreign 
countries during the fiscal year ending June SO, 19 W — Continued. 



Articles. 


Merchandise from 
United States. 


Merchandise from 
foreign countries. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Tobacco and manufactures of: 

Manufactures of 




1384,987 

1,478,527 

152,935 

1,589,303 
173,742 
509,207 
116,246 
42,886 

1,575,244 
376,053 
931, 146 
715,037 

3,775,152 




$58 


Unmanufactured Twunds . . 

Toys 


3,747,030 


81,852 


12,280 


Vegetables: 

Beans and dried peas bushels. - 

Onions do — 

Potatoes do — 

All other canned 


370,031 

57,777 
272,692 


1,997 

31,425 

96 


10,712 

54,346 

153 

6 983 


All other including picles and sauces 






297 819 


Wood and manufactures of: 

Boards, deals, planks, joists, and scantlings. M. feet. 
Furniture 


23,594 


2,281 


87,394 
4,174 

30,433 
9 744 


All other 






Wool, manufactures of 






All other articles 






1,048^396 








Total 




90,724,259 




5 664 275 











Table No. 7. — Domestic and foreign merchandise shipped from Porto Rico to the United 
States and foreign countries during the fiscal year ended June SO, 1920. 



Articles. 



Domestic merchandise shipped to — 



United States. 



Quantity. Value, 



Foreign countries. 



Quantity. Value, 



Beeswax poimds. 

Cocoa do... 

Coffee V. do. . . 

Cotton (Sea Island) do. . . 

Fruits and nuts: 
Fruits — 

Green, ripe, or dried- 
Grapefruits boxes. 

Oranges do . . . 

Pineapples do. . . 

All other 

Canned — 

Pineapples 

All other 

Prepared or preserved— 

Pineapples 

Nuts: Coconuts M. 

Hides and skins other than fur skins pounds . 

Honey do... 

Leather, sole do. . . 

Meat products, tallow do. . . 

Perfumeries, cosmetics, etc., bay rum 

Seeds: 

Annatto pounds . 

Cotton do. . . 

Spirits, distilled alcohol gallons. 

Straw hats 

Sugar and molasses: 

Sugar tons. 

Molasses : gallons . 

Tobacco, and manufactures of: 

Cigarettes M. 

Cigars M. 

Leaf pounds . 

Scrap do . . . 

All other domestic exports 



33,401 

39,645 

908,577 

349,008 



419,629 
336,300 
140,906 



16,845 

892,605 

3,559,694 



156,538 



316,094 

93 

124,685 



Total exports of domestic merchandise . 
Total exports of foreign merchandise. . . 



Grand totaL 



418,912 
15,059,273 

7,541 

226,776 

16,782,769 

3,390,587 



$12,066 

9,422 

264,981 

193,260 



1,332,742 

832,346 

479,461 

8,337 

99,172 
917 

15,992 

1,129,752 

329,020 

445, 177 



31,868,177 



20,173 
54,380 

16,808 

10 

56,350 

114,782 

98,802,436 
1,141,390 

75,942 

11,607,445 

12,479,021 

839,032 

12,643,219 



133,003,632 
203,875 



133,207,507 



$8,769,047 



325 



1,229 
*3'626 



1,288 

8,215 
12,660 



90,602 
14, 110 
141,919 



9,954 
12,431 
19,325 



180,545 



476 
1,810,826 

1,976 

251 

312,946 

21,263 



95,747 
55,410 

121,314 
137,413 

7,676 

6,552 

94,200 

4,135 

8 7,959,124 



17,318,746 
285, 195 



17,603,941 



1 This includes the following important commodities: 

* This includes chiefly shipments of domestic merchandise (not of Porto Rican manufacture) exported to 
Dominican Republic. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



13 



Table No. 7. — Domestic and foreign merchandise shipped from Porto Rico to the United 
States and foreign countries during the fiscal year ended June SO, 1920 — Continued. 





Quantity. 


Value. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Cotton ready-made cloth, 
embroideries, and drawn- 
work 




$806,917 
13,769 
7,427 


Copra 

Mona Island guano 

Ginger root 

Grape juice fruit... 


.pounds.. 
...do.... 
....do.... 
.gallons.. 


83,859 

4,815,374 

57,706 

10,379 


?6,822 
45,743 
3,666 


Manganese ore pounds . . 

Coconut fiber . .,. do 


3,084,700 
205,786 


18,504 



The sugar exports to the United States amounted to 418,912 short 
tons, valued at $98,802,436. In addition 476 tons, valued at 
$121,314, were shipped to foreign countries. These figures represent 
an increase of 67,269 short tons over the shipments of the previous 
year with a difference in price of $50,710,637. The total production 
for the year just ended was 485,887 tons, and if to these figures are 
added the 147,000 tons which were awaiting shipment on July 1, 1920, 
the total amount of sugar available during the fiscal year 1919-20 
reached the high figure of 632,887 tons. There must have been 
about 200,000 tons in the island still unshipped on June 30, 1920. 

Table No. 8. — Sugar exports. 



Fiscal year. 


Short tons. 


Value. 


Average 

price per 

ton. 


Fiscal year. 


Short tons. 


Value. 


Average 

price per 

ton. 


1901 .... 


68,909 
91,912 
113,108 
129,647 
135, 663 
205, 277 
204,079 
234,607 
244,257 
284,522 


$4,715,611 

5,890,302 

7,470,122 

8,690,814 

11,925,804 

14,184,667 

14, 770, 683 

18,690,504 

18,432,446 

23,545,922 


$68.43 
64.08 
66.04 
67.03 
87.90 
69.10 
72.37 
76.52 
75.46 
82.75 


1911 


322,919 
367, 145 
382,700 
320,633 
294,475 
424,955 
488,943 
336,788 
351, 910 
419,388 


?24,479,346 
31,544,063 
26,619,158 
20,240,335 
27,278,754 
45,809,445 
54,015,903 
41,362,229 
48,132,419 
98,923,750 


$75.81 


1902 


1912 


85.92 


1903 


1913 


69.55 


1904 


1914 


63.12 


1905 


1915 


92.64 


1906 


1916 


107.79 


1907 


1917 


110.47 


1908 


1918 


122. 81 


1909 


1919 


136.77 


1910 


1920 


235.88 









The export ations of unmanufactured tobacco amounted to 
20,507,565 pounds, valued at $13,416,38!S, representing an increase 
of 2,648,006 pounds and of $4,995,805 over the previous year's 
figures. 

Table No. 9. — Cigars. • 



Fiscal 
year. 


Withdrawn 

for con- 
sumption. 


Withdrawn 
for export. 


Total output. 


Fiscal 
year. 


Withdrawn 

for con- 
sumption. 


Withdrawn 
for export. 


Total output. 


1907.... 
1908.... 
1909.... 
1910 


74,698,430 
76,983,830 
84,933,260 
92,700,160 
101,064,495 
111,682,615 
119,038,300 


132,669,823 
103,781,719 
140,302,271 
151,724,438 
174,743,098 
169,765,656 
1 165, 768, 512 


207,368,253 
180,765,549 
225,235,531 
244,424,598 
275,807,593 
281,448,271 
284,806,812 


1914.... 
1915.... 
1916.... 
1917 


122,711,543 

101,423,083 

1109,130,296 


1150,363,991 

1174,275,407 

1159,248,815 

210,399,365 

181,779,519 

1149,124,690 

223,316,450 


263,075,534 
275,698,490 
268,379,151 


1911.... 
1912.... 
1913.... 


1918.... 
1919.... 
1920.... 


1106,646,685 

194,334,802 

98,023,748 


288,426,204 

1243,459,497 

311,340,198 



1 Treasury figures. 



14748—20 2 



14 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



CHART SHOWING INCREASE IN QUANTITY OF 

SUGAR EXPORTED FROM PORTO- RICO 

1919-1920 



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REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OP PORTO RICO. 



15 



I 



CHART SHOWING INCREASE IN NUMBER OF 
CIGARS EXPORTED FROM PORTO-RICO 
I9I9-I920 















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16 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 
Table No. 10. — Cigarettes. 



Fiscal 
years. 


Withdrawn 

for 

consumption. 


Withdra-wTi 
for export. 


Total output. 


Fiscal 
years. 


Withdrawn 

for 
consumption. 


1907.... 
1908.... 
1909.... 
1910.... 


347,722,000 
354,407,900 
365,525,500 
393,844,300 
459,710,045 
5.32,431,000 
464,861,201 


10,460,000 
11,232,424 
11,244,500 

113,142,000 
11,760,000 

111,293,350 
18,907,600 


358,182,000 
355,640,324 
376,770,000 
406,986,300 
471,470,045 
1543,724,350 
1473,768,810 


1914.... 
1915.... 
1916.... 
1917.... 


376,695,120 

339,080,165 

1308,025,865 


1911.... 
1912.... 
1913.... 


1918.... 
1919.... 
1920..-. 


1 340,077,040 

1426,582,000 

576,424,970 



Withdrawn 
for export. 



16,195,000 

1 12,020,750 i 

111,785,430 

9,571,250 ' 

6.439,600 ! 

120,111,600 I 

5,123,850 : 



Total output. 



1382,890,120 
1351,100,915 
1319,811,295 

*"346,'5i6,'640 

1446,693,600 

581,548,820 



I Treasury figures. 
Table No. 11. — Tobacco leaf and scrap exported. 



Fiscal years. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Fiscal years. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


1907 


4,344,659 
8,402,286 
4,539,320 
4,176,172 
4,450,012 
5,456,751 
8,536,776 


$1,232,058 
1,996,055 
1,250,237 
1,258,317 
1,554,783 
2,320,130 
3,188,227 


1914 


9,244,490 
9,285,333 
8,084,914 
9,408,723, 
17,196,323 
17,859,559 
20,507,565 


$3,206,610 


1908.. 


1915 


3, 204, 423 


1909 


1916 


3,033,149 


1910 


1917 


3,850,670 


1911 


191« 


8,982,130 


1912 


1919 


8,420,583 
13,416,388 


1913 


1920 







The exportations of coffee to the United States amounted to 
908,577 pounds, valued at $264,981 ; and to foreign countries, 31,868,- 
177 pounds, valued at $8,769,047. These figures represent an in- 
crease of 632,048 pounds with a value of $196,039 over the previous- 
year with the United States. The average price of coffee tnis year 
was $0,276 per pound, against $0,217 the year before. 

Table No. 12. — Coffee exports. 



Fiscal years. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Average 
price. 


Fiscal years. 
1911 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Average 
price. 


1901 


12, 157, 240 
26,906,399 
35,207,139 
34,329,972 
16,849,739 
28,290,322 
38,756,750 
35,256,489 
28,489,236 
45,209,792 


$1,678,765 
3,195,662 
3,970,574 
3,903,257 
2, 141, 009 
3,481,102 
4,693,004 
4,304,609 
3,715,744 
5,669,602 


$0. 137 
.118 
.112 
.113 
.127 
.123 
.121 
.122 
.130 
.125 


.33.937.021 


$4,992,779 
6,754,913 
8,511,316 


$0 147 


1902 


1912 1 40; 146,365 

1913 49,774,107 

1914 50,211,947 

1915 : 51,125,620 

1916 32.144.283 


.168 


1903 


.171 


1904 


8,193,544 1 .163 


1905 


7,082,791 ; .138 


1906 


5, 049, 283 . 157 


1907 


1917 


39,615,146 


5,892,081 
5,505,316 
6,065,573 
9,034,028 


.149 


1908 


1918 


37,618,613 
27,897,971 
32,776,754 


.146 


1909 


1919 

1920 


.217 


1910 


.276 









REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



17 



CHART SHOWING THE QUANTITY OF COFFEE 
EXPORTED FROM PORTO- RICO 
DURING THE YEARS 
1913-1920 



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18 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. \29..— Coffee exported from. Vorto Rico dvrinq the fiscal years ended June to, 

1918 to 1920. 



Countries. 



France 

Gibraltar 

Spain 

Cuba 

Virgin Islands 

Dutch West Indies... 
British West Indies. . 

Canary Islands 

French West Indies. . 
Dominican Republic. 



Total exported to foreign 

countries 

Total shipped to United States 



Total. 



1918 



Pounds. 
1,227,819 



9,598,203 

26,460,877 

22,335 



1,000 

25, 137 

100 

26,445 



37,361,916 
256,697 



37,618,613 



1,557,710 

3,686,569 

3,255 



165 

3,401 

16 

4,631 



5,466,252 
39,064 



5,505,316 



1919 



Pounds. I 
492,364 I $149,527 



11,699,537 ! 2,523,528 

15,396,150 3,317,937 

5,919 1,040 



4,599 



27,621,442 ' 5,996,631 
276,529 ; 68,942 



27,897,971 | 6,065,573 



1920 



Pounds. 

921,904 

3,920 

4,543,472 

26,308,963 

6,648 

100 

50 

73,222 



31,868,177 
908,577 



$279,704 

1,100 

1,377,993 

7,082,373 

1,750 

50 

14 

23, 190 



2,873 



8,769,047 
264,981 



32,776,754 | 9,034,028 



Shipments of grapefruit increased in quantity by 2,260 boxes and 
in price by $593,636 from 417,369 boxes, with a value of $739,106, 
to 419,629 boxes, with a value of $1,332,742. Oranges increased 
$63,272; pineapples increased $20,786. Coconuts increased $384,763, 
from $757,649 to $1,142,412. 



Table No. 13. — Value of fruit exports. 



Fiscal year. 


Oranges. 


Pineapples. 


Canned 
pine- 
apples. 


Coconuts. 


Grapefruits. 


Other 
fruits. 


Total. 


1901 


$84,475 
51,364 
■ 230,821 
352, 646 
125,422 
295,633 
469,312 
630,720 
401,912 
582, 716 
703, 969 
584,414 
740,091 

752. 180 

378. 181 
790, 797 

1,009,737 

1,231,551 

770, 203 

833,575 


(0 

s:i 

0) 
0) 

$27,826 

64,831 

172, 779 

442,780 

555,044 

641,291 

684, 774 

1,142,348 

1,246,001 

1,723,863 

1,176,406 

916,415 

617,496 

458,675 

479,461 


0) 
(') 
0) 

(J) 

$42, 186 
63,519 
98,203 
117,830 
106,587 
149, 744 
258,671 
147,564 
175, 534 
84, 735 
122, 876 
139, 765 
75,216 
148,662 
99, 172 


$8,334 

12,720 

326 

0) 

129, 793 
174,957 
206, 704 
204,498 
218, 870 
258, 168 
308,883 
353,690 
451, 882 
410,378 
413,573 
438,564 
572,600 
757,649 
1,142,412 


0) 

(0 

0) 

?;? 

$7,586 

44,535 

76,310 

162, 749 

309,698 

525,048 

726,811 

751,769 

834,440 

837,014 

939,677 

1,120,330 

739, 106 

1,332,742 


$16,992 
9,898 
61,956 
81,214 
130,478 
7,420 
3, 737 
11,320 
18, 154 
9,851 
11,123 
15,972 
10,415 
23,537 
9,560 
14,619 
18,411 
11,021 
24,185 
13,568 


$109,801 


1902 


' 73, 892 


1903 


293, 103 


1904 


433, 860 


1905 


255, 900 


1906 


502, 858 


1907 


783,942 


1908 


1,164,261 


1909 


1,261,484 


1910 


1,635,817 


1911 


2,073,993 


1912 


2,377,762 


1913 


3", 120, 919 


1914 


3, 400, 903 


1915 


3,441,157 


1916 


3,355,285 


1917 


3,459,569 


1918 


3,628,214 


1919 


2, 898, 580 


1920 


3,890,930 







I Shipments Included under "Other fruits." 



REPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OE PORTO RICO. 



19 



CHART SHOWING INCf^EASE IN THE VALUE OF O FLANGES. 
PINEAPPLES,COCOANUTS AND OR/<PEFf^UlT EXPOf^TED FROM 
POR,TO R,ICO FROM 
1901-1920. 



760 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 
4 50 
400 
350 
300 
250 
200 
I 50 
100 
50 
Oi}C Milliop 
950 
900 
850 
800 
750 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 
450 
400 
3 50 
300 
230 
200 
I 50 
100 
50 



Orange a 
l^incapptcs 
Cocoonuts 
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1901 . 

1902 

»903 

1904 . 

1905 

1906 

1907 . 

1908 

1909 

1910 

19' I 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

»9I6 

1917 

1918 ■ 

1919 " 

1920 



^ «4.4 7 5 
51.364 
230,82 I 
352,64 6 
125.422 
293,633 
46 9,3 12 
630,720 
401,9 12 
582,7 I 6 
703,969 
584,4 /4 
740,09 I 
752,180 
378,(61 
79 0,797 
1009,737 
1,2 3 1.5 5 1 

7 7 0,303 

8 3 3,575 



P ( I) 

( I) 

(<) 

(< ) 

O ) 

27,62 6 

64,83 1 

172,779 

442.76 O 

555,044 

641,2 9 I 

684,7 74 

I, 142.348 

(,24 6.0 1 

(.7 2 3363 

(.( 7 6,406 

9 I 6.4(5 

6 1 7.496 

458.675 

4 79,4 6 ( 



Qrrqpc fruit 



8.334 

(2,720 
326 

CO 

(I) 
129.793 
174.9 5 7 
206,704 
204 A 96 
2(8,870 
258,(68 
308^883 

3 53.690 
45 1,882 

4 ( 0. 378 

4 ( 3, 573 
438.564 

5 72,600 
75 7,649 

1,142,4(2 



7.586 
4-4,535 
76^3(0 
16 2,749 
309,698 
52 5,048 
72 6, e I I 
75 1,769 
834.440 

8 3 7.014 

9 3 9.677 
(,(20,330 

739, 106 
1.3 3 2,742 



20 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 14. — Statement hy countries of value of merchandise brought into Porto Rico 
from the United States and foreign countries for five years ending June 30 ^ 1920. 



Countries. 


Shipped into Porto Rico. 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


United States 


$35, 892, 515 

370 

80,979 

144,209 

1,011 

61, 551 

23,805 

15,746 

650,317 

23,146 

295 

351,011 

651, 183 

30 

212, 520 


$49,539,249 


$58,945,758 


$57,898,085 


$90,724,259 


Belgium 


15, 175 


Denmark 


85,252 
157, 101 


54,231 
147,211 


19,348 
86, 734 


106, 603 


France 


96, 154 


Germany . 


91,404 


Italy 


66, 734 

3,927 

9,705 

985,370 

32,141 


51, 720 
1,131 


39,621 


55, 545 


Netherlands . . 


216, 069 


Norway 






Spain 


523,041 
23,767 
4,002 
253, 732 
863, 550 


600, 621 

12, 115 

8,276 

149,316 

771,912 


1,011,177 


Sweden 




Switzerland 


5,477 


United Kingdom 


191, 122 
776, 482 


• 256,965 


Canada 


1, 440, 707 


Costa Rica 




Mexico 


251,269 


257,236 


309,415 
942 

18,087 

994 

87,302 

1,039,403 

33, 564 

443 

200 

56,003 


353, 785 


Panama 


1,608 


Newfoundland 


12, 142 


93,058 

10 

73,966 

595, 450 

35,235 

4,685 

1,666 

20,016 

14, 958 

19,955 

27,251 

433 

30 

453 

1,928 

31,831 

17,650 


38,021 

430 

85,634 

1, 166, 859 

43,346 

1,652 

1,652 

29,345 


40, 924 


West Indies: 
British . . . ." 


7, 245 


Cuba 


65,574 

382, 447 

6,309 

14,419 

16 

29,060 

36,336 

14 


137,011 


Dominican Republic 


737, 683 


Dutch. .. 


61, 220 


French 


6,395 


Haiti . . 




Virgin Islands 


103, 083 


Argentina 




Brazil 




101, 776 

131,111 

8,771 

146 




Chile 


162,313 

887 


208, 110 


Colombia 


7,340 


20, 920 


Ecuador 




British Guiana 









Peru 


1,244 
4,457 
11,588 


3,678 
81, 196 
54,823 


2,292 
28,443 
71,380 
13,325 

609,911 
81,975 
9,291 
173,821 
25,924 
9,813 


1,551 
48, 097 
62,185 


Uruguay 


Venezuela 


China 


1,069 
426,590 


East Indies: 

British India 


196,917 


446,727 


471, 182 


French East Indies 




Hongkong. . 










Japan 


1,316 


7,371 


97,467 


2,449 


Slam 


Canary Islands 


54,461 
18,828 


54,199 


24,918 


48, 449 


British East Africa 




Jamaica ... 








625 














Total 


38,951,156 


53,545,224 


63,389,282 


62,400,360 


96,388,534 





BEPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOB OP PORTO EICO. 



21 



CHART SHOWING INCREASE IN THE VALUE OF 


THREE PRINCIPAL PRODUCTS EXPORTED FROM 


PORTO-RICO NAMELY SUGAR. CIGARS end COFFEE FROM 


I9I9-I920 


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Fiscal Sugar 

YEAR 


Cigars 


Coffee 




1901 +.7 1 5.6 1 1 


306.1 1 S 


1.6 7 8.76 5 




1902 5.8 9 0,3 02 


1.549.235 


3.19 5.66 2 






1903 7.4 7 0.122 


1.753.79 5 


3.970,574 






1904 8.6 9 0.8 14 


1.46 0.496 


3.903.2 57 






1905 1 1.925.804 


2.1 52.05 1 


2.14 1,009 






1906 14.184.667 


3.0 74.2 26 


3.48 1.102 






1907 14770.6 82 


4.24 1.4 1 


4.6 93.0 04 






1908 18,6 9 0.5 04 


3.414.140 


4.304.6 9 






1909 1843 2.446 


4.383.893 


3.71 5.744 






1910 23545.922 


4.48 0.03 


5.66 9.6 02 






19 11 24.4 7 9.346 


5.355,223 


4992.779 






1912 31.544.063 


5.086.7 1 1 


6,7 549 13 






19 13 26.6 1 9.1 58 


5.800.G86 


8.5 1 1,3 16 






1914 20.240.335 


5.597.2 76 


8.19 3.544 






1915 27.278.754 


6.0 16.122 


70 82.79 1 






1916 4 5.809.44 5 


5.531.535 


5,049.2 83 






19 17 54.0 15.903 


7,843.0 10 


5.8 92.0 8 1 






1918 41.362.229 


7.13.4.6 9 3 


5,505.3 16 






1919 48.132.419 


6.6 5 7.522 


6.06 5.5 73 






1920 98.923.750 ^ 


1 1.6 13.997 


9.034,028 





22 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO, 



Table No. 15. — Statement by countries of value of merchandise shipped from Porto Rico 
to the United States and foreign countries for the past five years ending June 30 ^ 1920 » 



Countries. 


Shipped from Porto Rico. 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


United States 


$60,952,768 

276,091 

1,566 

401,551 

2,058 

86, 456 

9, 830 

1,293,378 

253, 696 

33, 507 

85 


$73,115,224 
567, 046 


$65,514,989 
229, 724 


$71,015,351 

149, 527 

8,296 


$133,207,508 

312,927 

8,562 


France 


Gibraltar 


Italy 


39,292 


259 


Mexico 






Netherlands . 


174 








Norway 








Spain..' 


1, 837, 874 


1,651,161 


2, 855, 450 


1, 594, 763 


Sweden 




United Kingdom 


53, 880 


155, 684 


10, 000 
300 


258,232 

2,549 

310 


Canada... . 


Panama 






West Indies: 
British 


18, 589 
2,781,292 
39, 505 
71,322 
62, 267 


4,745 


1.^ 4fi5 


14,816 

3,418,698 

210,618 

88,621 

50,565 

7; 258 

1,585,348 


14, 754 

7, 263, 756 

336,609 


Cuba 


3,561,478 ! 3, 809', 504 

298,653 i 312,226 

106, 100 I 67, 623 

54,537 i 113,475 

1,376 i 11,293 

1,257,090 2,361,770 


Virgin Islands 


Dutch 


178, 103 
34,382 


French 


Haiti.. 


2,879 
7,411,010 


Dominican Republic 


276, 892 

13, 571 

30, 050 

150 


Argentina . . . 


Colombia 


1 


11,605 


58, 868 


Uruguay 


1 


Venezuela 


30, 425 

75, 834 

1,690 


16,893 1 3i,459 
49,891 19-099 


41,424 

27, 855 


88,315 
36, 127 


Canary Islands 


Spanish Africa. 


1,623 
2,200 
2,841 




Bra7.il 








Dutch East Indies 










Chile . 




291 






Peru 






182 
126 


825 


Dutch Guiana. 






970 










Total 


66,731,573 


89,970,917 1 74.294.022 


79,496,040 


150,811,449 











Table No. 16. 



Fiscal year. 


Sugar. 


Cigars. 


Cofffee. 


Fiscal yoar. 


Sugar. 


Cigars. 


Coffee. 


1901 


$4,715,611 
5,890,302 
7,470,122 


$306,115 
1,549,235 
1,753,795 
1,460,496 
2,152,051 
3,074,226 
4,241,410 
3,414,140 
4,383,893 
4,488,030 


$1,678,765 
3,195,662 
3,970,574 
3,903,257 
2,141,009 
3,481,102 
4,693,004 
4,304,609 
3,715,744 
5,669,602 


1911 


$24,479,346 
31,544,063 
26,619,158 
20,240,335 
27,278,754 
45,809,445 
54,015,903 
41,362,229 
48,132,419 
98,923,750 


$5,355,223 
5,086,711 
5,800,686 
5,597,276 
6,016,122 
5,531,535 
7,843,010 
7,134,693 
6,657,522 


$4,992,779 
6,754,913 
8,511,316 
8,193,544 
7,082,791 
5,049,283 
5.892,081 
5,505,316 
6,065,573 
9,034,028 


1902 

1903 


1912 

1913 


1904 


8,690,814 
11,925,804 
14,184,667 
14,770,682 
18,690,504 
18,432,446 
23,545,922 


1914 


1905 


1915 


1906 


1916 


1907 


1917 


1908 


1918 


1909 


1919 . . 


1910 


1920 













Table No. 17. 



Fiscal year. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Total. 


Fiscal year. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Total. 


1901 


$8,918,136 
13,209,610 
14,449,286 
13,169,029 
16,536,259 
21,827,665 
29,267,172 
25,825,665 
26,544,326 
30,634,855 


$8,583,967 
12,433,956 
15,089,079 
16,265,903 
18,709,565 
23,257,530 
26,996,300 
30,644,490 
30,391,225 
37,960,219 


$17,502,103 
25,643,566 
29,538,365 
29,434,932 
35,245,824 
45,085,195 
56,263,472 
56,470,155 
56,935,551 
68,595,074 


1911 


$38,786,997 
42,972,891 
36,900,062 
36,406,787 
33,884,296 
38,951,156 
53,545,224 
63,389,282 
62,400,360 
96,388,534 


$39,918,367 
49,705,413 
49,103,565 
43,102,762 
49,356,907 
66,731,573 
80,970,917 
74,294,022 
79,496,040 

150,811,449 


$78,705,364 
92,678,304 
86,003,627 
79,509,549 
83,241,203 
105,682,729 
134,516,141 
137,683,304 
141,896,400 
247,199,983 


1902 


1912 


1903 


1913 


1904 


1914 


1905 


1915 


1906 


1916 


1907 


1917 


1908 


1918 


1909 


1919 


1910 


1920 







REPOET OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 28 

Legislation. 

As already mentioned elsewhere, a special session of the legislature 
was called to meet on April 26, 1920. 

The body promptly convened at 10 a. m. on the appointed day 
and adjourned on May 6, 1920, after the passage of 19 acts and 6 
joint resolutions, all of which were duly approved by the acting 
governor. May of these enactments were of real importance, though 
most of them w^ere amendments to laws already in force. 

The excise laws, the municipal law, the election law, and working- 
men's compensation law were all amended in several important 
particulars. In addition an act was passed authorizing the incor- 
poration of cooperative societies of production and consumption as 
well as a law increasing the salaries of all the employees and officers 
of the insular government. The appropriation for the maintenance 
of the police force was also increased, in order to meet the exigencies 
of the situation caused by the widespread strike in the cane fields. 

There was also enacted a law to aid in the development of the 
project of a new workingmen's barrio for the city of San Juan. The 
plan for such a barrio has long been in process of development, but 
its final execution was made more urgent by the imminence of the 
actual beginning of the dredging operations which would immediately 
force the removal of a large part of the laborers from the congested 
district of Puerta de Tierra. 

Executive. 

proclamations. 

Formal proclamations, including rules and regulations prepared 
by the insular board of health and approved by the executive council 
in accordance with the sanitary law, and resolutions adopted by 
the insular board of elections in accordance with the election and 
registration law, were promulgated in the form of administrative 
bulletins as f olows : 

No. 155. — October 17, 1919; reward offered for the apprehension of Jesus Cruz 
Gomez, alias "chuchu," a fugitive from justice. 

No. 156.— November 5, 1919; promulgating sanitary rules and regulations for 
the prevention of infantile tetanus and of blindness due to opthalmia neonatorum. 

No. 157. — November 17, 1919; promulgating amendments to sanitary rules and 
r egulations concerning removal of corpses, cemeteries, burials, disinterments, and 
cremations. 

No. 158.— November 21, 1919; Thanksgiving Day for 1919, 

No. 159. — December 22, 1919; lands of the People of Porto Rico set apart as insular 
forests. 

No. 160. — January 27, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular 
board of elections providing for the numbering of precincts in municipalities which 
are divided into more than one representative district. 

No. 161. — ^January 27, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular 
l^oard of elections providing for substitute members of the insular board of elections. 

No. 162. — February 4, 1920; general registration and election days, 1920. 

No. 163. — February 10, 1920; promulgatiug amendments to sanitary rules and 
regulations concerning transmissible diseases; to avoid their propagation in the 
island of Porto Rico. 

No. 164.— February 10, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular 
board of elections providing that cnairmen of local boards of elections and their duly 
authorized and acting substitutes shall sign certificates of registration. 

No. 105.— February 10, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular 
board of elections providing for substitute members of local election boards. 



24 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

No. 166. — February 10, 1920: i)romulgating resolution adopted by the insular 
board of elections designating chairmen of local election boards and custodians of 
records and property. 

No. 167. — February 14, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular 
board of elections providing that members of local boards of elections shall take oaths 
of office. 

No. 168. — February 16, 1920; conduct that should be observed by the people 
and the police during the strike. 

No. 169. — ^March 1, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular board 
of elections providing that petitions for registration must be presented to local election 
boards duly filled out. 

No. 170.— March 1, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular board 
of elections concerning the number of persons who may be present in a registration 
place at the same time. 

No. 171. — ^March 2, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular board 
of elections prescribing the time and manner of sending petitions for registration 
and certificates of registration to the insular board of elections by local boards of 
elections. 

No. 172,— March 2, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular board 
of elections prescribing the order of admittance to registration places and places 
where photographic work is being done for registration purposes. 

No. 173. — ^March 17, 1920: promulgating resolution adopted by the insular board 
of elections providing that all secretaries of municipal courts and all justices of 
the peace may administer oaths on petitions for registration in registration places. 

No. 174. — ^liarch 17, 1920; promulgating resolution adopted by the insular board of 
elections extending the hours of registration in all precincts which form a part of or 
are included in a municipality in which a municipal court is located. 

No. 175. — March 30, 1920: promulgating amendments to Rules IX and XII of the 
civil-service rules. 

No. 176. — April 20, 1920; proclamation calling a special session of the legislature. 

No. 177. — May 8, 1920: additional registration days, 1920. 

No. 178.— May 11, 1920; additional registration days, 1920. 

No. 179.— May 28, 1920; additional registration days, 1920. 

No. 180. — June 3, 1920; additional registration days, 1920. 

No. 181. — ^June 4, 1920; additional registration days, 1920. 

No. 182. — ^June 9, 1920: additional registration davs, 1920. 

No. 183. — ^June 17, 1920; additional registration days, 1920. 

PARDONS AND PAROLES. 

During the fiscal year 1919-20 the governor received 450 petitions 
for clemency. 

The following statement shows the number of petitions received 
and the action taken thereon: 

Applications for clemency granted : 

Full pardons 16 

Conditional pardons 34 

Paroles 21 

Sentences commuted ' 7 

Fines remitted 2 

Civil rights restored 38 

•118 

Denied after investigation and consideration 189 

Filed without consideration 67 

374 
Pending 76 

Health and Sanitation. 

The work of the department of health in Porto Rico, like that of 
education, presents a huge task, which at times seems almost dis- 
couraging, and both of these departments work under two severe 
but inescapable handicaps: (1) An extremely dense and crowded 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 25 

population, which is at the same time steadily and rapidly increasing; 
(2) the cumulative eflFects of many long years of neglect, which neglect 
has resulted from the viewpoint of sanitation, in widespread infec- 
tion, soil pollution, and deplorable housing conditions for the poor 
all over the island. 

The sanitation work has been vigorously maintained in all of its 
organized branches throughout the fiscal year. Special attention 
was given to tuberculosis, malaria, and uncinariasis, the three most 
important transmissible diseases, which, taken together with infant 
mortality, account for 60 per cent of the total death rate. 

This special attention was caused in large part by th^ visit to the 
island of a commission sent by the Rockefeller Foundation upon the 
joint request of the commissioner of health and the governor. This 
commission, consisting of Drs. John B. Grant and Victor G. Heiser, 
made with the cooperation of the local sanitary officers a close study 
of the general health conditions, paying especial attention to the 
three important diseases above mentioned. One result of this study 
was to confirm the opinion that about 90 per cent of the people of 
the island are infected with uncinariasis. The percentage was found 
to be especially high in the large rural territory of the interior, due to 
soil pollution, which is caused in turn by the deplorable housing 
conditions and the ignorance and poverty of the people. Tubercu- 
losis and malaria were also found to be distressingly widespread and 
prevalent. 

The Rockefeller Foundation has generously proffered expert advice 
and assistance in formulating a plan of oampaign against these dis- 
eases and also a liberal contribution of money upon the condition 
that certain appropriations be made by the local government. It 
seems easily possible for all these details to be arranged satisfactorily. 
The construction of the buildings necessary to complete the sanatorium 
for patients suffering from tuberculosis was carried forward through- 
out the year, mostly with funds contributed by private citizens. 

Two hospitals have been located at strategic points in the moun- 
tain region for patients afflicted with malaria, and two also, one on 
the north side, one on the south side, for those having uncinariasis. 
, Dispensaries have also been established at other points for these and 
other diseases. Every effort has been made to reduce infant mor- 
tality with some success. The figures showing the percentage that 
infant mortality bears to the general mortality are 43.09 per cent, 
which are the lowest in 10 years, but it seems almost certain that 
this decrease is chiefly due to the improvement in the economic con- 
ditions. All of the various divisions of the department, namely, 
transmissible diseases, sanitary engineering, biological and chemical 
laboratories, etc., report a year of intensive and progressive work. 
The death rate for the year was 23.33 per 1,000 inhabitants. Total 
deaths, 30,280; total births, 50,729; excess of births over deaths, 
20,440. 

PUBLIC ASYLUMS. 

Insane asylum. — The number of patients in the insane asylum 
during the fiscal year 1919-20 was 671. On June 30, 1919, there 
were 475 patients in the institution, 196 were admitted during the 
course of the year, and 183 were discharged, leaving a total ol 488 
inmates on June 30, 1920. 



26 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Conditions at present are such that no more patients can be 
admitted; and if those now receiving attention are to be retained, 
important changes and repairs have to be made in the building to 
meet the existing crowded situation. 

A mild form of influenza which appeared in March was rapidly 
put under control. The death rate was low in comparison with other 
years, being 9.49 per cent from several diseases. 

Modern methods have been applied generally and the laboratories 
of the department of health have been kept busy discovering and 
proving diagnoses. 

During the fiscal year 1919-20, 99 males and 97 females were 
admitted; 97 males and 86 females were discharged during the 
same period, leaving 228 males and 260 females, a total of 488 
patients in the establishment on June 30, 1920. 

^ There were registered 64 deaths in all during the year from various 
diseases. 

Statistical tables showing diagnoses of mental diseases, of the 

[)sychosis, intercurrent diseases and causes of the deaths are pub- 
ished elsewhere in this report. 

Blind asylum. — ^The number of patients in the blind asylum on 
June 30, 1919, was 37, classified 14 as curable and 23 as incurable. 
During the fiscal year 1919-20, 115 were admitted, of whom 69 were 
discharged, leaving on June 30, 1920, a total of 83 patients in the 
institution. Of the 69 discharged 40 left cured, 24 left upon request 
not cured, and 5 died. 

During the period covered by this report 61 operations were 
performed. 

The present accommodations are not what they should be. The 
building used as infirmary is too small and inadequately equipped. 
It is recommended that a better place be provided for the purpose, 
and that at the same time a house be btiilt for the use of the director 
of the asylum. 

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS. 

Boys^ and Girls^ CJiarity Schools. — On June 30, 1919, there were 
281 inmates in the Boys^ Charity School; 166 were admitted during 
the year and 54 were discharged, leaving 393 at the close of the 
fiscal year on June 30, 1920. The Girls' Charity School had 178 
inmates on June 30, 1919; 139 were admitted during the year and 
18 were discharged, leaving a total of 299 inmates in the school on 
June 30, 1920. 

The same course of study laid down by the education department 
of Porto Rico is followed in both schools and supplemented by 
training in manual arts. 

In the Boys' Charity School there are workshops for carpentry, 
masonry, plumbing, shoemaking, and construction of many articles 
of cement.* Very efficient work has been turned out during the year. 

In the Girls' Charity School sewing by machine and hand is taught; 
also embroidery, knitting, and drawn work. The girls are also 
taught to cook. 

Tne health in both schools during the past year has been unusually 
good. 

The following recommendations are made: 

The construction for each school of a separate building to be used 
as an infirmary; the construction of separate buildings for the 



EEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 27 

kitchens; the enlarging of lavatories and laundries; and finally the 
enlargement of the buildings now occupied by both schools, as the 
present accommodations are too small to meet existing needs. 

Insular Board of Health. 

This board at present consists of 4 physicians, 1 pharmacist, 1 
attorney, 1 sanitary engineer, and a secretary. All the regular 
meetings were held and also extraordinary meetings at which many 
different subjects have been submitted, studied, and decided. The 
board has cooperated thoroughly with the department of health, of 
which in reality it is an important part in all of its work. 

Its intervention has been especially helpful in pushing construction 
of cottages for tubercular patients at the sanatorium, where 20 
cottages have been completed and 19 are under construction, for 
which work $92,949 have been secured from private donations. 

The insular board, both collectively and individually, have coop- 
erated in the study of the health conditions made under the leader- 
ship of the Rockefeller Commission, and the board has approved all 
the plans formed for the prevention and cure of malaria and hook- 
worm. Several sanitary regulations covering various subjects were 
carefully amended during the year, and three regulations covering 
most important matters are now under intensive study. 

Institute of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 

The Legislature of Porto Rico amended the law organizing the 
Institute of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and in accordance with 
its terms the governor reappointed Drs. P. Gutierrez Igaravidez and 
I. Gonzalez Martinez as permanent members. The staff was 
increased with the appointment of Dr. A. Torregrosa, who became 
secretary, and Dr. A. Santana Nater, dispensary physician. 

Dr. Gonzalez Martinez was given a leave of absence to proceed to 
visit the medical centers of London, Paris, and Barcelona for the 
purpose of furthering relations with similar institutions and of par- 
ticipating in the research work now being done in those places, thus 
making the institute the beneficiary of the important scientific prog- 
ress and experiments for the benefit of the island. 

On September 14, 1919, the act reorganizing the Institute of Tropi- 
cal Medicine and Hygiene went into effect. Complying with its pro- 
visions the commissioner of health, the president of the insular board 
of health and the chairman of the board of medical examiners, ex 
officio members, were invited to come together. The first meeting 
was held on September 30th and a permanent organization made. 
The officers of the institute have had during the period covered by 
this report frequent consultations with the aforesaid members about 
matters relating to the routine scientific work, investigations, and 
future plans. 

Researches on sprue have received fresh impetus. Patients from 
all over the island have applied for diagnosis and more than 293 of 
these gave positive diagnosis. 

On July 30, 1919, a tuberculosis clinic was inaugurated, but had to 
be closed because the supply of medicines was exhausted. During 
the five months of its existence 139 patients were attended. 



28 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

The amount of laboratory work done during the fiscal year 1919-20 
was tremendous, as will be seen by glancing over the following figures. 
There were made 2,560 serological examinations, 667 blood examina- 
tions, 3,544 fecal examinations, 815 micrological investigations, 326 
bacteriological examinations for pus, 9 histological examinations for 
diagnosis of tumors, 1 chemico-bacteriological examination for sus- 
pected meningitis, and 1 Von Pirquets test for tuberculosis. 

The splendid work carried out oy the institute eloquently speaks 
of its efficiency and proves the confidence obtained from the medical 
profession. 

Insular Police. 

The report of the chief of the insular poKce indicates clearly that 
this branch of the government has performed during the year a great 
deal of hard work. For they had not onlv to attend to the routine 
duties of a police force, the enforcement of the law, and the mainte- 
nance of order, but also a large number of extra duties, made necessary 
by the strikes among the laborers. This made necessary the appoint- 
ment of a large number of extra police in order to safeguard the public 
peace and to protect property and personal rights in the large area 
over which the strikes extended. 

Throughout all these labors, the police force as a whole maintained 
their usual excellent morale and firm and efficient conduct. There 
were comparativelv few breaches of discipline reported and such as 
there were, have been thoroughly investigated and proper action 
taken by the commission. 

As an evidence of general good conduct of the police, it may be 
stated that 63 complaints were presented before the courts charging 
policemen with various crimes. Of these 63 cases, 52 have been 
finally disposed of by the courts and only two policemen were sen- 
tenced. The 11 cases are still pending. 

The enforcement of the prohibition law continues to add largely to 
the work and duties of the police, for although the decision of the 
higher courts placed the enforcement of the Volstead Act under the 
Federal authorities, the police have continued to aid and cooperate 
in every possible way. The chief of police adds his testimony to that 
of the attorney general that crime is decreasing in Porto Rico, espe- 
cially those forms of crime such as drunkenness and disorderly con- 
duct which result from the use of intoxicating liquors. 

There was an increase in the number of arrests during the year of 
4,420 over the figures of the previous year, but this was due not to 
intoxication, but to the widespread strikes which prevailed throughout 
the greater part of the year. The serious crimes of violence, namely, 
murder and homicide were only 35 in number as compared with 77 in 
1914-15. The average for nine years previous was 63. The entire 
permanent force was the same as the previous year, but the total 
expenditures were $616,604.34, an increase of $127,029 over those of 
the previous year, accounted for in the main by the increase of salaries, 
and payment to special police during strikes as explained above. 

Civil Service Commission.^ 

The civil service commission had a record year in applications for 
examination having received 1,441, which total represents an increase 
of 94 over the figures of the previous year and is the highest on 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO BICO. 29 

record. There were examined 1,225 applicants; 710, or 56.57 per 
cent secured a passing average, and 258 eligibles secured appointments 
against 211 in the previous year. 

For the United States Civil Service Commission there were ex- 
amined 213 persons; of these 151 took the test for appointment in 
Porto Rico and 102, or 67.55 per cent, were approved; 62 took ex- 
aminations for positions in Wasnington. 

Two changes were made in the civil-service rules. Rule IX was 
modified to adjust entrance salaries with the increases granted by the 
legislature, and Rule XII was also changed to permit payment in 
advance of salary for the entire period covered by the leave granted. 

A recommendation is made for the enactment of a retirement law 
for all the classified civil-service employees who have served the Gov- 
ernment for* a specified period of time. The recommendation for the 
extension of the classified service is also repeated. The insular ser- 
vice has 6,134 positions; of this number 1,453 are in the classified 
service and 4,681 are in the unclassified. If the classified service 
-could be extended to include the municipal positions and most of the 
4,681 in the insular unclassified service, great benefits both in economy 
.and efficiency would be obtained. 

Board of Medical Examiners. 

During the month of July, 1919, the board of medical examiners 
issued licenses to three physicians who took special examinations 
with success. 

In October regular examinations were held. Fourteen physicians 
were examined and 9 passed. Out of 15 minor surgeons, 7 were 
approved and received their licenses; 3 optometrists took the test 
and 1 was approved; 2 midwives were examined and only 1 passed; 
16 nurses were also examined; 9 passed successfully. 

In April, 1920, new examinations were held. Seven physicians who 
-applied were approved; 24 nurses, of whom 10 passed; 1 midwife 
failed; 2 optometrists were licensed; 9 minor surgeons were examined, 
2 were approved, and 7 disapproved. 

Board of Pharmacy. 

During the fiscal year 1919-20 the board of pharmacy acted upon 
several matters that were presented to it for consideration. 

An application was received for a license. The candidate was sub- 
mitted to the usual test and, having failed to meet the requirements, 
the license was refused . 

In October, 19 applicants came before the board. Their papers 
were examined and being in order the examination was given. Ten 
candidates took the test, of whom 5 passed and were duly licensed. 

On April 26, 1920, 4 candidates were reexamined, 2 were approved, 
and 2 failed. 

Twenty-six applications were approved and recorded in the meet- 
ing of June 21, 1920. Of this number only 4 candidates stood the 
test and received licenses. 

During the year ended June 30, 1920, the board of pharmacy 
.admitted to practice and issued licenses to 11 pharmacists. 

14748—20 3 



30 REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Board of Dental Examiners. 

On August 9, 1919, Dr. Lorenzo J. Casalduc, who was appointed by^ 
the governor a member of the board of dental examiners, took posses- 
sion of his office. 

During the period covered by this report the board of dental exam-^ 
iners has held two examinations . On the first occasion, August 27,1919,. 
14 candidates applied, all of whom passed and were given licenses.. 

In February, 1920, three new applications were considered and 
after examination they were found qualified and licenses were issued, 
by the board in accordance with the law. 

Board of Trustees of the University of Porto Kico. 

1. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — This college, located' 
at Mayaguez, has had difficulty in carrying on its work owing to the- 
loss of property by the earthquake and fire of October 11, 1918, much 
of which has never yet been replaced. 

The college has therefore had to continue with such makeshifts for 
buildings and such partial equipment as the funds available made it 
possible to secure. 

Nevertheless, a crreditable and successful year of work was accom- 
plished due to the fine spirit of both the faculty and the students. 

The college has had difficulty in holding some of its students untiL 
the completion of their courses of study because of the continued 
demand for the services of men with technical training. The college- 
now supplies the manual-training teachers for the public schools, the- 
assistant chemists in the sugar factories, and the inspectors of agri- 
culture and labor. This local demand absorbs its output and nir- 
nishes indisputable evidence of its usefulness to the island. The 
entrance requirements have been kept at the same high print as here- 
tofore, but the niunber of students is constantly increasing. A 
summer session was maintained in 1919 with an enrollment oi 164,. 
of whom 100 remained for the regular session. This indicates that- 
the college will soon have to arrange for foux quarters of work and 
keep open 12 months of the year. 

2. The colleges at Rio Piedras. — ^The total em*ollment of students at 
Rio Piedras colleges of the university showed an increase of 22 per cent 
over the figures For the previous year. In some of the departments 
of work the enrollment was more than double that of the previous^ 
year, as was also the number of diplomas, degrees, and certificates. 

This increase of attendance is a tribute to the quality of the work 
done at the university and also an indication of the ambition of the 
young men and women of Porto Rico for the best and highest educa- 
tion within their reach. A summer session was held at Rio Piedras, 
as at Mayaguez. Throughout the year the usual high standards of 
work were required and maintained. 

The board recommends a large increase in the appropriations for 
the maintenance of the colleges of the university both at Rio Piedras 
and Mayaguez for buildings and equipment as well as for more 
teachers and better salaries. 

Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Library. 

The total accessions of books during the year was 3,090, divided 
nto 725 Spanish and 2,365 English. 



BEPOBT OF THE GOVEBITOR OF PORTO RICO. 31 

Reports received from custodians of collections show that the' 
traveling libraries have given satisfactory service and the demand 
for additional cases is growing daily. Many books have also been 
sent out by parcel post to many towns outside of San Juan, thus 
facilitating their use all over the island. 

A revision of the catalogue is being made, and on account of the 
growth of the library a new office room for said purpose has been 
mstalled in the top floor to accommodate new accessions. It is hoped 
that this will serve for a few years to come. 

One hundred and thirty-five books and 15 volumes of periodicals 
have been bound. 

The number of Spanish books received has been rather small. This 
has been due to abnormal conditions originated as a result of the war« 

Insular Government Finance. 

As shown in the report of the treasurer published in full elsewhere 
in this volume, great improvement was made during the year in the 
general condition and prospects of the insular treasury. This im- 
provement has come about partly by legislation passed by the extra 
session and partly by the increased receipts of the treasury derived 
from various sources due to the general prosperity of the island. 
The legislative measures for the improvement of the treasury above 
referred to were as follows: (1) In order to relieve the insular treas- 
ury of the embarrassment of the old no-fiscal year appropriations, 
which had been held to be real liabilities under the new organic act 
and had caused an apparent deficit on the books of the treasury every 
year, the legislature passed a joint resolution staying the execution of 
all these no-fiscal year appropriations until such time as the money 
might become available under the operation of a trust fund created 
for the purpose and designated as ^^The trust fund for the construc- 
tion of public works. ^^ This swept away for the moment all the 
accumulated no-fiscal year appropriations and relieved the embar- 
rassment of both the treasury and the legislature itself. Hereafter 
these old appropriations will be gradually provided for by the opera- 
tion of this trust fund, which will be slowly built up in such a way as 
not to create embarrassment. (2) The law under which all taxes paid 
under protest must be turned into a trust fund and held out of^ the 
treasury until all litigation in regard to said taxes was settled was 
modified so as to provide that taxes paid under protest shall here- 
after be covered into the treasury just as are other taxes, and the law 
also outlines the procedure to be followed by all the parties concerned 
with these protested taxes. 

The former law had been greatly abused in such a manner that 
large sums of money were piled up in this trust awaiting the slow 
progress of tedious litigation in the courts, which after all usugJly 
resulted in favor of -the Government. 

These two important measures will afford sure relief to the treasairy 
of the island from serious difficulties of long standing. The increased 
receipts from taxes were sufficient not only to enable the treasury to 
close the year with a larger cash balance than for many years hereto- 
fore, but in addition to liquidate several items of demand obligations 
which for several years had constituted a potential embarrassment. 

The total collections during the year amounted to $7,238,570.17, 
which were $117,223.17 in excess of the estimates, notwithstanding 



32 BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

the fact that none of the United States internal-revenue collections, 
amounting to $1,660,215.91, had been covered into the insular treas- 
ury. The cash balance at the end of the year was $1,056,414. 

Moreover, the sum of $240,000 borrowed from the banks for earth- 
quake relief had been paid. The demand obligation of $300,000 
which had been standing for some years in the Mechanics & Metals 
National Bank of New York was also paid, though not until after the 
close of the year. 

The long-standing embarrassment caused by the serious delay on 
the part of the United States Treasury in covering into the insular 
treasury the collections due from the United States internal-revenue 
taxes has been graciously relieved by the officials of the former who 
have consented to change the method of handling and accounting for 
these funds. Hereafter they will be turned into the insular treasury 
direct at the end of each month after their collection. 

The estimate made by the treasurer of the revenues for 1920-21 
amounts in the aggregate to $9,015,000, while the total assets for 
the year, including cash on hand, are estimated to reach $10,203,405. 
The total liabilities are $9,797,319, leaving an estimated cash balance 
for June 30, 1921, of $406,086. 

However, as the present income-tax law was limited in its operation 
to a period of two years only, the next legislature will be compelled 
either to extend it or enact a new one. 

The total assessed valuation of all property for purposes of taxa- 
tion revised to June 30, 1920, aggregated $264,235,686. 

The following is a summary of the transactions of the insular 
treasury for the fiscal year 1919-20: 

Customs receipts during the year amounted to $300, 000. 00 

Internal revenue receipts accruing to the insular government, made 
up of $249,255.76 from excess over legal municipal and school 
board maxima, $286,503.53 from United States internal revenues, 
$347, 025.54 from property taxes, $2,458,575.63 from income taxes, 
$41,933.43 from inheritance taxes, $1,509,453.09 from tobacco tax, 
$1,475,786.02 from tax on spirits and liquors and for other taxes, 

aggregated 6,368,533.00 

Receipts from fees, fines, and other miscellaneous sources amounted to . 804, 537. 17 

Making the total actual revenue collected on account of the 

fiscal year 1919-20 7,473,070.17 

There also reverted to and were paid into the treasury on account of 
general fund, representing repayment of loans to municipalities and 
school boards, repayment of unexpended funds to appropriations, 
sales refunds from the working capital account of the bureau of 
suppUes, printing and transportation, and various other minor 
transfers, aggregating 2,051,096.74 

Making the total insular treasury receipts on account of general 

funds available for expenditure under appropriations 9,524,166.91 

Receipts on account of trust funds, representing $2,322,018.99 in 
property taxes on account of municipalities and school boards; 
$955,000 from sale of pubhc improvement bonds; from court fees 
and fines, $50,063.27; from harbor and docks fees, $40,959.07; from 
interest on bank deposits, $3,557.85; in bond-redemption tax, 
$630,897.29; and $3,159,119.08 from miscellaneous sources and 
transfers, amounted to 7, 161, 615. 55 

Bringing the total receipts of the treasury for the year up to 16, 685, 782. 46 

This amount, added to the cash in the treasury at the close of 1918-19 . . 5, 022, 316. 36 

Make the total to be accounted for 21, 708, 098. 82 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 33 

On account of appropriations by the legislative assembly there were 
expended during the fiscal year; 

For legislative expenses $53, 558. 63 

For all services, public works, improvements, and 
expenses incurred by and effected through the 
various branches of the executive departments 

of the insular government 6, 662, 169. 03 

For the support of the judiciary 462, 606. 56 

For miscellaneous purposes 81, 636. 35 

Or a total of 7,258,970.57 

Further disposition of available funds in loans to munici- 
palities and school boards, transfers and repayments 
to appropriations, including repayable expenditures 
from the operation account of the bureau of suppUes, 
printing and transportation, and municipal and school 
boards bonds redeemed, amounting to 2, 047, 168. 12 

Brought the total amount expended and disposed 

of up to $9,306,138.69 

Reducing the amount at the disposal of the Government to 12, 401, 960. 13 

Disposition of trust funds, represented by payments made from munic- 
b ipal and school board tax accounts amounting to $2,723,816; expendi- 
E.tures from irrigation fund $524,415.57; other expenditures, repay- 
ments and transfers $3,057,592.96; in all aggregating 6, 315, 824. 53 

Reduced the amount to the credit of the Government at the end of the 

W- year in available resources to 6, 086, 135. 60 

Segregating from this amount representing funds held in trust for 
specific purposes 5, 029, 721. 45 

There remains available for expenditure under legislative Appro- 
priations 1, 056, 414. 15 

Outstanding Bonded Indebtedness. 

The total bonded indebtedness of the insular government was 
reduced during the year by $252,000 as follows: $50,000 paid on 
account of road loan of 1907; $22,000 paid on account of refunding 
bonds of 1915; $150,000 paid on account of irrigation loan of 1909; 
and $30,000 paid on account of refunding bonds of 1916. 

The total bonded indebtedness was increased during the year by 
the sale of $1,000,000 of public improvement bonds of 1919. The 
total bonded indebtedness at the close of the fiscal year amounted to 
$10,264,000, 

The limit of indebtedness under the organic act on the basis of 
the present assessed valuation is $18,496,000, so that the above 
amount of bonded indebtedness is well within the limits. 

Ample provision is made to cover principal and interest on these 
bonds when they fall due, as follows: 

Road bonds payable from insular bond-redemption tax upon all 
property $3,775,000 

Irrigation bonds payable from irrigation tax upon the 
irrigated lands $4, 767, 000 

Harbor improvement bonds payable from San Juan 
Harbor dues 600, 000 

Refunding bonds (these bonds are issued by The 
People of Porto Rico upon a deposit of a like amount of 
municipal and school board bonds pledged as collat- 
eral, the sinking fund of which is used for the pay- 
ment of princi pal and interest of the refunding bonds) . 1, 122, 000 

6, 489, 000 

Total 10,264,000 



34 REPOKT OF THE GOVEKNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

As shown above, the pubhc indebtedness is secured to the amount 
of $6,489,000 by collateral securities sufficient to insure payment of 
principal and interests thereof. The remaining $3,775,000 of public 
improvement bonds represent a direct responsibility of The I^eople 
of JPorto Rico but special taxes levied on the property of the island 
for the purpose of retiring them are more than sufficient for the 
purpose. 

Municipalities. 

The municipalities of the island are at present in a state of transi- 
tion. The new municipal law, which was fully described and dis- 
cussed in the last annual report, went into effect on October 29, 1919. 
At the close of the year under review the new system had been in 
operation only eight months. Moreover, the changes made by the 
new law were so radical that it will necessarily rec[uire some time for 
the new officials to become thoroughly familiar with their duties and 
for the people to understand the extent and meaning of their own 
control over their local affairs and to learn how to use it. 

It is, therefore, too soon to pass judgment upon the new system as 
a whole or to hazard a prediction as to how much effect it will have 
for better or for worse upon the municipal government of the island. 
At this moment opinions vary. 

Moreover, experience has also varied considerably in different 
towns even for the short period of trial. 

It seems almost certain that some features of the law will very soon 
require amendment, especially as they apply to the smaller munici- 
palities in the matter of making loans. Also the relations of the local 
authorities to the insular heads of the departments of health and edu- 
cation do not seem to be satisfactorily adjusted. 

However, all this was naturally to be expected and the legislature 
may be relied upon to make such amendments as experience may show 
to be necessary. 

The general fiscal operations of the municipalities as reported show 
in the main a healthy condition. There were large increases both in 
the receipts from taxation and also in expenditures. The former was 
due chiefly to the new municipal law which increased considerably 
the proportion of the general property taxes that is covered into the 
municipal treasuries. The increase in expenditures was also due in 
part to the new law which added to the municipalities new services 
as well as new officials, and also in part to the continued rise in prices 
of materials and supplies. There was also a large increase in the total 
cash balance remaining in the municipal treasuries. 

The progress in securing modern public improvements in the 
municipalities has been steadily going on during the year. 

About 50 per cent of the towns of the island, including, of course, 
all the larger ones, are now provided with more or less efficient water 
systems. Several more are arranging to build waterworks in the 
near future. Nine towns now have sewer systems, and surveys have 
been nfiade for three others. 

Education. 

The estimated school population of Porto Rico of children from 5 
to 18 years of age is 452,446 out of a total population as enumerated 
in the census of 1920 of 1,297,772. The percentage, therefore, of the 
school population is 35. This is probably the largest percentage that 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 35 

<}an be found anywhere in the United States, or perhaps in the world, 
and shows the immensity of the task that falls upon the department 
of education. 

The greatest difficulty connected with the work of this department 
during the past year has been the securing of proper teachers to fill 
the positions in the public schools. The low salaries for teachers 
which have heretofore prevailed in Porto Rico and the limited number 
of properly qualified persons have made this an especially difficult 
problem. However, the increases of the salaries of the teachers made 
oy the legislature, both at the last regular session and at the special 
session, have mitigated somewhat the intensity of this difficulty. 
During the year the total enrollment in all the public schools was 
184,991, as compared with 160,794 for the previous year, an increase 
of about 24,200. Of this number 115,077 were in rural schools, 
59,174 in elementary urban schools, 3,882 in secondary schools, 644 
in the collegiate departments of the University of Porto Rico, and 
the rest in special schools and night schools. In addition to the 
enrollment in public schools, there were 5,823 pupils in private schools. 
The enrollment in the public schools was only 40.7 per cent of the 
total population of school age, and the only reason why this percent- 
age can not be immediately and largely increased is the lack of seating 
capacity in the schools provided for the instruction of pupils. There 
was an increase of about 17,000 in the enrollment in the rural schools 
and 5,000 in the elementary urban schools. The number of buildings 
used for schools was 1,903, of which 569 were owned by the Govern- 
ment and especially built for the purpose. The balance were rented. 
The number of teachers employed was 3,286, as compared with 2,984 
the previous year — an increase of 302. All of the teachers were 
native Porto Ricans except 153 who were brought from the continent. 
The work of acquiring sites and constructing new buildings has 
progressed slowly, being retarded somewhat by the high cost of 
materials. The total expenditures for educational purposes by the 
insular government during the past year was $2,464,318, or 37 per 
cent of the total insular budget. In addition the municipalities dis- 
bm-sed $686,443 from their own school funds, making a total for 
school purposes of $3,150,761. This is an increase of $683,058 over 
the corresponding figures for the previous year. 

The total valuation of school property owned by the public is as 
follows: Sites and buildings, $2,801,066; equipment, $1,033,046; 
textbooks, $408,978. As in the previous year, the emphasis upon 
the rural schools was continued and intensified in every possible way 
but much remained to be done for the improvement of the rural 
schools. One thousand one hundred and thirty of them are still 
ilistalled in rented buildings, and 638 are reported to be without 
modern furniture and equipment. Of all the rural schools, 90 per 
cent are upon the double-enrollment plan. One important feature 
of the rural-school work was the effort made by the department of 
education to make a complete enumeration of all the children of 
school age throughout the rural barrios. This was done by the 
teachers and supervisors themselves, without any appropriation or 
extra compensation. The results of this school census were as 
follows: The number of children of school age in rural barrios, 
204,017; number of parents who can read and write, 25,044; parents 
who are illiterate, 59,502; parents who show an interest in education, 
58,301. 



36 REPORT OF THE GOVERlfTOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Agriculture and Labor. 

The department of agriculture is still working hard at the funda- 
mental problems of the entire agricultural industry in Porto Rico^ 
namely, (1) the diversification of the products of the farm, and (2) 
the improvement of the intelligence, agricultural methods, standard 
of life, and independence of the individual farmer. As to the first 
problem, the diversification of farming, especially along the line of 
producing food crops, very little progress has been made, or can be 
made in this period of extraordinary high prices of sugar, tobacco, 
and other commercial crops. In a sort of desperation on account 
of this unsafe and unsatisfactory condition the acting commissioner 
of agriculture protests against the general conditions of land tenure 
in the island; also against the tariff system and the whole commercial 
system under which the economic life of the island is now conducted. 

Interesting tables are submitted which show that out of the whole 
land surface of the island, amounting to 2,072,068 acres, only some 
half million acres are actually cultivated in any one year. This 
leaves one and a half million acres that are un tilled. The implication 
is that this great body of untilled land may perhaps be withheld 
from cultivation by the large owners for some selfish reason or by 
the small landowners because of their inability to use it. It seems 
to me that a more reasonable explanation of this important fact 
may be found in the physical and climatic conditions of the island 
itself. In the first place, Porto Rico is a mountainous country. 
An immense proportion of the land surface is so mountainous that it is 
imifit for cultivation in any proper sense of that term. Some of the 
mountain region is used for coffee — that is, coffee trees are planted 
and allowed to grow under the forest cover wherever there are forests. 
Again, some small part of the steep mountain slopes are actually 
cmtivated in tobacco and minor fruits to the grave injury of the land 
itself. But I should say that at least a very great proportion of the- 
mountain region of Porto Rico never has been and never can be 
really cultivated. 

In the second place Porto Rico is a tropical country. Most of the 
cereals, such as wheat, rye, oats, etc., and the clovers and other 
grasses and forage crops will not grow in the Tropics. The only^ 
leguminous crops that can be grown in the Tropics are beans and 
cowpeas, but these are expensive to plant and to harvest and the 
market for them is limited ; and while these vegetables can be and 
are used to a limited extent as a rotation crop, they can never take 
the place of the great cereals and clovers which play so large a part 
in the farming operations of the Temperate Zones. Therefore the 
Porto Rican farmer, when he desires to restore the fertility of his 
soil, can not rotate his crops, as does the farmer in the Temperate 
Zone by planting those things that quickly rest the land and at the 
same time yield a harvest. So, he is compelled at times to throw 
the land out of cultivation and allow it to grow up in the native 
grasses, which restore the land very slowly and at the same time 
make indifferent pasture. This fallow land, resting for future culti- 
vation forms a considerable part of the so-called ^' waste land,'' or 
unused land. 

In my judgment, when due allowance is made for these physical 
and climatic conditions, a very large proportion of all the land ia 



BEPORT OF THE G0VER2!T0R OF PORTO RICO. 37 

Porto Rico which is susceptible of cultivation is actually used. It 
may not be cultivated wisely or according to the best methods, but 
is actually used. 

The whole commercial system of the world, the entire economic 
life of man, is founded upon the division of labor and the distribution 
of industry and agriculture among the regions of the globe according 
to climate and their respective advantages. Of course, tropical 
countries must grow tropical crops very largely and import cereals, 
etc., from the outside. Of course, it would be much better for Porto 
Rico if her participation in the commercial system of the world 
could be so modified as to increase the production of food crops in 
the line of vetetables and minor fruits, but this change will surely 
come with the fall of prices from their present abnormal levels, and 
this can not be long delayed. 

As to the other fundamental problem, the development of the 
individual farmer, much more progress has been made. The agri- 
cultural bureau has initiated the organization of local farmers^ 
leagues in the various municipalities all over the island for the uplift 
and independence of the farmers by cooperative methods. It is 
proposed to form these local leagues in every municipality and to 
train the local farmers to use them for cooperative buying, selling, 
for credit, and in many other ways. A large number of leagues have 
already been organized, and the Porto Rican farmers seem to get the 
idea very quickly. This is a movement of great importance and of 
fine promise, especially for the small farmer. 

Along all the lines of work already established much progress 
was made and really useful work accomplished during the past year. 

The natural resources of the island are oeing systematically studied, 
and a museum of minerals and other objects is in process of formation. 

The bureau of agriculture in cooperation with the insular experi- 
ment station has performed a large amount of useful work along the 
line of discovery and propagation of methods of control of the various 
diseases and insect pests which destroy or damage diflFerent crops 
grown by the island farmers. All of the various divisions and inves- 
tigational services of the department cooperated and took an active 
interest in this most important work. 

Real progress seems to have been made during the year in the 
matter of the yellow-stripe disease of sugar cane popularly called 
the '^mottling'^ disease. It is now believed that this disease can be 
held in check by eradication and seed selection. Progress is also 
reported in other diseases, and in the protection of the farmers 
against fraudulent fertilizers, in the eradication of cattle tick, im- 
provement of the varieties of fruit trees and plants and the breeds 
of live stock, etc. 

The work of the forestry division has already been briefly mentioned 
elsewhere. 

The bureau of labor reports on the various phases of its work and 
makes some recommendations as to future legislation. 

The work of inspection and investigation as to labor conditions and 
conapliance with labor laws was pushed as thoroughly as funds appro- 
priated permitted. Especial attention was given to the enforcement 
of the minimum wage law for working women, the law regulating the 
work of women and children, and the scaffold law. 



38 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

The first of these laws was so drawn as to cause uncertainty as to 
what industries, the minimum wages for women workers would be 
applied to, and much litigation resulted, some of which is still pending. 
The other laws have been in force for a longer period and it was found 
that they are in general complied with, though there are cases in 
which they are not enforced as well as they ought to be. 

Some of the recommendations are for amendments to the labor 
laws in the interest of better enforcement. 

As to the economic conditions of the laborers generally, the bureau 
reports that while wages in general were increased during the year in 
varying degrees and in almost all lines of employment, nevertheless 
the real condition of the laborers has not been much improved owing 
to continued rise in the cost of the prime necessities of life. 

Auditing and Accounting. 

There have been no material changes in* the general system of 
auditing and accounting which has been in force for the past several 
years. During the fiscal year, only a few minor changes were made 
which seemed necessary for simplification. 

The most important new work of the auditor's office during the 
year was the formulation of the rules and regulations governing 
municipal accounting in accordance with the new municipal law 
which became effective on the 29th of October, 1919. 

These rules and regulations involved a reorganization of the former 
accounting system of the municipalities with very material changes 
in procedure. The new regulations were devised by the auditor's 
office and duly approved by the governor on May 26, 1920, to take 
effect July 1, 1920. In order to liquidate the school boards which 
were abolished by the new municipal law a large amount of unusual 
work was thrown temporarily upon the examining division of the 
auditor's office, which had to examine thoroughly the accounts of 
the 75 school boards, so as to transfer to the respective municipalities 
all funds accounts and properties. Although, like other departments, 
this office was hampered by the difficulty of securing and retaining 
competent personnel, all of this extra work and the regular work oi 
the department was dispatched with its usual efficiency and 
promptness. 

Public Works. 

roads and bridges. 

The report of the commissioner of the interior shows that a large 
amount of work has been accomplished during the past year in all of 
the various divisions and branches of this important department. 
The division of public works has been very busy in carrying out the 
large program of building roads and bridges under the laws author- 
izing bond issues for that purpose. This work has been considerably 
retarded by the serious difficulty of securing materials and the cost 
has been increased by the rising prices of materials and cost of labor, 
but in spite of these handicaps much has been accomplished. 
There have been completed during the year 31.4 kilometers of 
macadamized road and 8 reinforced concrete bridges with a total 
length of 246 linear meters. 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 39 

The total amount during the year for this work including surveys 
and cost of right of way was $582,056.91 and for bridges and culverts 
$132,797.30, or for construction $714,854.21. Almost all of this 
amount was taken from the proceeds of boncj sales. 

This money has been expended under a broad policy of new road 
construction adopted in 1916, whereby sections of new road are being 
built all over the island. 

In the opinion of the commissioner, the time has come, due to 
increased cost of construction, to modify this policy in one of two 
ways — either to provide much larger funds so as to push with far 
greater rapidity the construction work of present program, or else 
narrow the program and confine the work to fewer roads so as to get 
them completed within a reasonable time. 

The division of maintenance and repairs of roads expended prac- 
tically the entire appropriation of $807,000 in the repairing and main- 
taining in a good condition the road system of the island. The in- 
creased cost of materials and labor has greatly affected this branch 
of the work also and a larger appropriation is sorely needed. 

BUILDINGS. 

The work of this branch of the service was greatly modified and 
immensely increased by the reconstruction and repairs made neces- 
sary by the earthquake, the greater part of which fell within the fiscal 
year covered by this report. One very important feature of this 
earthquake work was the reconstruction of the small houses of the 
very poor in accordance with the law of the legislature which, pro- 
vided funds for the purpose. In this work the division of piiblic 
buildings, in cooperation with the earthquake board, took the great- 
est interest, and in some of the municipalities, the result was the 
building of a new and sanitary barrio for the laborers whose homes 
had been destroyed. In this way a nucleus will be created for better 
housing conditions which it is hoped will grow, and also spread to 
other towns and cities. 

For Aguadilla it should be stated that the American Red Cross 
and various private organizations and individuals cooperated by con- 
tributions of^money to supplement the public funds for the building 
of their barrio, in which 100 houses have already been completed. 

At the same time that this work of rebuilding the houses of the 
poor was being carried out at Aguadilla and Mayaguez the situation 
m San Juan, which was very similar, was taken up by the legislature 
and a bond issue authorized to provide funds for a new laborers' 
barrio for the special relief of those poor people who were about to 
be driven out of their miserable houses in Puerta de Tierra by the 
dredging of the harbor. 

This work also fell upon the division of public buildings and by 
the end of the year the land for the new barrio had been obtained 
and urbanized and 50 wooden houses had been completed. This 
work will be pushed through .the next fiscal year and very soon the 
miserable congested settlements known as ''Salsipuedes'' and ''Hoyo 
Frio'' will disappear from the face of the earth. 

In addition to these unusual duties, the division performed all the 
usual service of maintenance and repairs of insular public buildings, 
assistance to municipalities in planning and constructing of municipal 
buildings, etc. 



40 REPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOR OF PORTO RIOO. 

Public Lands. 

During the fiscal year 1919-20, 3,032.24 cuerdas of Government 
land were surveyed and marked with permanent monuments. Pri- 
vate lands amounting to 4,143.32 cuerdas were also surveyed. The 
average cost of surveying per cuerda was $3.17. 

Complying with the provisions of laws enacted by the Legislature 
of Porto Rico, the commissioner of the interior executed 11 deeds 
transferring titles to parties in possession of certain parcels of land 
in Catano; sold 14 lots in the barrios of Marina and Puerta de Tierra, 
in the municipality of San Juan, at public auction; and sold to vari- 
ous parties in compliance with the provisions of special laws other 
lots which belonged to The People of Porto Rico. 

Forty-seven parcels of land yielding an annual rental of $4,274.34 
were leased during the year to private individuals. The total annual 
rental which the Government received from lands leased to private 
parties was $18,257.39. This was $2,007.27 less than the receipts of 
the previous year from the same source and was due to the fact that 
several parcels of land aggregating 38,874.85 cuerdas were turned 
over to the department oi agriculture and labor for forest purposes. 

In compliance with the workingmen's homestead law a parcel of 
land in Vega Baja, which had been leased at a yearly rental of $1,000, 
is now being divided into lots and will be sold to workingmen. 

Insular Telegraph. 

The volume of business transacted by the insular telegraph during 
the period covered by this report surpassed that of all previous years. 
The lines were extended and new apparatus installed in towns where 
the telephone service is controlled by the government. 

On June 30, 1919, the total number of apparatus installed was 41^ 
and at the close of the fiscal year 1919-20 there were 408 in operation. 

The night-letter service inaugurated in 1916 has constantly in- 
creased, and this year 4,259 letters were transmitted which pro- 
duced $1,423.87. 

The United States Government has used the insular telegraph lines 
for the transmission of messages between the stations at Cayey and 
San Juan, and as a result of this 3,352 official messages with 104,234 
words have been dispatched. 

The total cash receipts for the year amounted to $141,560.45, an 
increase of $31,969.19 over the previous year's figures. 

The net profit after deducting all expenses amounted to $15,380.78. 
If credit were given for free and half-rate telegrams handled the 
total receipts would amount to $156,803.48. 

The total expenditures aggregated $137,804.74, showing a balance 
of $18;998.74. But if the free and half-rate telegrams are deducted 
a profit of $3,775.71 results, and if a proper allowance is made for 
improvements a real profit of $15,380.78 is obtained. 

The 77 offices in operation transmitted 443,232 messages of all 
kinds. 

Harbors and Docks. 

As a result of the war there was a great lack of ships during the 
last year, and the situation was aggravated by strikes of stevedores 
both in New York and San Juan. Notwithstanding these draw- 
backs the total number of ships entered at the different ports of the 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 41 

island increased over that of the previous year by 292, reaching a 
total of 1,599, and the total tonnage 3,915,607 as compared with 
3,148,384 the year before. 

Total income from all the harbors in the island was $54,075, an 
increase of 16.3 per cent over last year. 

The collections at San Juan were 55.59 per cent of the total. 

The march of progress has been especially notable in the increase 
of receipts of the San Juan Harbor Board. Although the commerce 
of the island was greatly hampered during the year by the lack of 
suJEcient vessels, nevertheless the receipts from San Juan harbor 
dues increased 37} per c^nt over last year. The receipts from the 
bulkhead increased 17 per cent over the previous year and it may be 
confidently predicted taat in the near future the total receipts of the 
harbor board will amount to at least $100,000 per year. The 
financial statement submitted gives full details of receipts and ex- 
penditures and demonstrates that the income of the board is not 
only sufficient to meet all present obligations, but that in the future 
it will be ample to justify lurther improvements of the harbor which 
are most urgently needed. 

To relieve the wharfage congestion, the public service commission 
granted a franchise for the construction of a large new pier to be 
located near the eastern end of the harbor, and the harbor board is 
considering the issue of bonds for still another pier in the central 
part of the harbor. The extension of the present bulkhead and 
other improvements are also under consideration. It is confidently 
believed that the dredging of the harbor, which is now in progress, 
will bring in its train a large development of the commerce of the 
port, and it is gratifying to know that the harbor board is in a posi- 
tion to be able to add all other improvements that may become 
necessary to the full development of all the possibilities of the port 
of San Juan. 

Irrigation District. 

Records of rainfall show that although precipitation has been 
very unusual this year both as to quantity and distribution as com- 
pared with previous years, nevertheless the rainfall was sufficient to 
keep full supply in the reservoirs, without any floods of importance. 

Deliveries of water in acre-feet during the year totaled 144,129.64, 
distributed as follows: 67,970.94 in the eastern division and 76,158.70 
in the western division. 

Due to heavy rains in July some excess of water was obtained and 
sold to water users who took advantage of the opportunity. 

Sales of surplus water were as follows: Acre-feet, 13,917.11; value, 
$42,071.54. 

The total acreage included by the irrigation commission as finally 
approved covers 26,939.70 acres, of which 2,830.22 acres are entitled 
to credits on account of relinquished concessions and 24,033.48 acres 
are subiect to tax levy for the fiscal year 1920-21. 

The hydroelectric system operated successfully throughout the 
year. Only one interruption of importance, occurred which was 
corrected after a short delay by the installation of a new transformer. 

There were generated at the power plant 5,924,520 kilowatt-hours, 
an increase of 1,094,330 kilowatt-hours over the preceding year, 
which produced $1 19,278.85 at an average of 2.013 cents per kuowatt- 
hour. 



42 REPORT OP THE GOVERNOR OP PORTO RICO. 

On June 30, 1920, there were 103 contracts signed for power 
covering 1,932.5 horsepower, an amount in excess of the cornbined 
capacity of the two generating units at the plant, which only amounts 
to 1,500 horsepower. The installations operating at the close of this 
report aggregated 1,340 horsepower, or 90 per cent of the full capacity 
of the plant. A new transformer will be installed and then all pend- 
ing contracts will be fulfilled. 

During the year titles have been perfected and deeds executed for 
the purchase of 19.734 acres of land for improvements in the irriga- 
tion service, valued at $2,153.85. Deeds are now pending approval 
for the purchase of 13.509 acres more, representing in value the sum 
of $3,647.99. 

The total expenditures to date for construction, including 
$35,863.88 expended in Patillas Reservoir, amounts to $4,239,710.20, 
and the interest paid during construction, amounting to $901,777.78, 
bring the total expenditures to $5,141,487.98. The total cost of 
operation of the irrigation and hydroelectric systems was $621,453.86. 
The principal and interest paid on outstanding bonds amounted to 
$150,000 and $193,680, respectively. The total amount of irriga- 
tion bonds outstanding on June 30, 1920, was $4,767,000. 

Unfortunately, the scheme of payments for water rents was formu- 
lated and adopted at a time of great depression in the sugar -industry 
and the charges during the early years of operation were purposely 
made very light. As it turned out far heavier payments coula have 
been imposed and carried without the slightest difficulty. 

The Carite water plant generated 5,924,460 kilowatts, delivered 
at substations 5,354,742 Mlowatts, and produced an income of 
$119,278.85. This greatly exceeded all of tne original estimates. 

The Isabela irrigation project is being pushed ahead. The amount 
of $50,000 from the funa of $200,000 appropriated has been solicited 
from the treasurer of Porto Rico for the purpose of completing plans 
and specifications for the construction of this new system, which is 
projected for the northern district of Porto Rico. 

Justice. 

Despite some difficulties caused by changes in personnel, the 
report of the department of justice for the year shows a creditable 
amount of work actually performed, along usual and approved 
lines as well as some interesting new features and developments. 
A considerable amount of important litigation was satisfactorily 
finished, some of it by securing final decisions in the court and some 
of it by making settlements out of court. Several important cases 
are still pending in the United States District Court. 

The advisory work of this department was much increased during 
the year by the new municipal law and the new election law. Both 
of these important statutes contained many new and radical features 
which required a large amount of study and legal advice from the 
department of justice and an unusual number of general opinions 
were rendered to the Governor, heads of departments, and various 
officers, boards and branches of the insular government. 

The most important new feature was the estabhshment of the grand 
jury system authorized by the law of June 18, 1919, which, took 
effect 90 days after passage. Under this law all felonies shall be 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 43 

presented by indictment of the grand jury. This system had been 
m operation therefore during nme months of the fiscal year and 
according to the report of the attorney general has worked sur- 
prisingly well under all the circumstances. Three hundred, and 
sixty-three cases were presented by the prosecuting attorney to 
the grand jury, and of this number 198 true bills were found, 82 are 
still pending, and 83 were thrown out as not true bills. Of the 198 
true biUs, there were 140 convictions, 35 acquittals, and 23 dismis- 
sals. The citizens called upon to act as grand jurors have shown 
quick adaptability to an institution unprecedented in Porto Kico 
and have performed their duties satisfactorily. The additional 
expense caused by the new system for the nine months was only 
about $4,200. 

The work of the civil courts has been heavy during the year, 
but in general has been satisfactorily performed and the juvenile 
courts have continued to develop their work successfully among the 
juvenile delinquents along approved and humane lines. On the 
criminal side, it seems clear from this report that criminality in Porto 
Rico is decreasing every year. During the last 10 years in spite of 
an increase in population of 16 per cent, the number of crimes have 
been steadilj^ decreasing. Misdemeanors, according to the records 
of the municipal courts, have decreased from 21,379 convictions last 
year to 20,072 during the year 1920, and the total number of felony 
cases tried have been 60 less than in the previous year. During the 
last year or two this decrease in crime may be attributed in part to 
prohibition and in part to the improved economic conditions; but 
taking the lO-year period as a whole, it may be undoubtedly attrib- 
uted to the general improvement in the intelligence and education 
of the people. 

• Penal Institutions and Reform Schools. 

These institutions have successfully followed during the year 
under review the same general policies which were inaugurated 
three years ago when they were transferred to the department of 
justice. The total daily average of prisoners in the penitentiary 
and district jails was 20 per cent less during the past year than 
they were two years before and 30 per cent less than they were 10 
years ago. In fact the number of prisoners in some of the district 
jails is so small that the department has under serious consideration 
a recommendation of legislation reducing the number of jails. The 
reform school has continued most successfully their work for the re- 
form of delinquent boys. Owing to lack of capacity there was a 
daily average of only 230 boys during the fiscal year, although the 
legislature had authorized 250. Much attention has been given to 
the physical development of the inmates and also to the sanitary 
condition of the buildings. The daily average number of the sick 
was 5 out of the total of 230, which compares very favorably with 
previous years. A modern hospital building isolated from the 
main building has been erected during the year. The work and prog- 
ress of this important institution reflects credit upon its director 
and employees. In the penitentiary new machinery has been in- 
stalled m both the bakery shop and in the carpentry shop which 
has increased the output and diminished the expense in both places. 



44 REPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

The department of justice has taken up again for fresh considera- 
tion the long-deferred project of the sale of the old penitentiary 
located in the city of San Juan and the building of a new one out in 
the countr}^ where it could be possible to adopt more modern and 
humane prison methods for the confinement and employment of 
prisoners. 

The report of the attorney general with accompanying tables and 
exhibits will be found in Appendix VIII. 

Franchises. 

Fifty-three franchises enacted by the public-service commission 
and approved by the governor during the fiscal jesLV covered by this 
report are enumerated in Exhibit D of Appendix I herewith. 

The number of franchises granted exceeded by far the preceding 
year, when only 12 were granted. 

These franchises may be classified as follows: For lighterage pur- 
poses, 21; for irrigation and industrial purposes, 18; for a pier con- 
cession, 1; electric plants, 7; ferry service, 1; pier and lighterage, 1; 
fuel-oil piping, 1 ; gasoline piping, 1 ; molasses piping, 1 ; and railroad 
belting around the island, 1. 

The most important of these franchises have already been explained 
and discussed under the head of the ''Public-service commission.'^ 

Personnel. 

The following changes in official positions filled by presidential ap- 
pointment took place: 

Appointments, — Salvador Mestre, attornev general, April 7, 1920; 
Paul G. Miller, commissioner of education, April 24, 1920. 

Separations. — Howard L. Kern, attorney general, resigned, Sep- 
tember 1, 1919. 

In accordance with existing laws, the governor during the fiscal 
year made the following executive appointments: Judges of district 
courts, 4; fiscals of district courts, 6; secretaries of district courts, 11; 
judges of municipal courts, 32; secretaries of municipal courts, 9; 
marshals of municipal courts, 8; justices of the peace, 62; registrars 
of property, 7; district chiefs of police, 13. 

A number of appointments were also made upon various boards 
and commissions, as provided by the laws under which they were 
organized, and the gentlemen who have accepted such appointments 
are entitled to an acknowledgment of the personal appreciation of the 
undersigned and an expression of the gratitude of the people of Porto 
Rico for the generous gift of their time and service to the public in 
attending to the duties imposed upon them thereby. 

Exhibit B to Appendix I of this report gives m detail a list of 
the appointments made by the governor during the past year. 

WoRKMEN^s Relief Commission. 

The workmen's accident compensation act was amended as to sec- 
tions 6, 7, and 8 by the Legislature of Porto Rico on May 6, 1920. • 
Section 6 created a commission consisting of five members, four of 
whom to be appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate, 
as follows : A president, to be the chief administrative officer, and three 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 45 

commissioners, one from each of the three political parties ; the fifth 
member to be the chief of the bm*eau of labor, exomcio. The presi- 
dent is given the power to pass upon all cases of temporary disability, 
reporting to the commission such decisions as he may have rendered. 

Section 7 compels all employers subject to the provisions of the act 
to report to the commission mjuries sustained by employees in the 
course of their employment. 

Section 8 provides that no application shall be denied on account 
of prescription unless it is shown that the party concerned was noti- 
fied of his right. 

On May 26, 1920, the newly appointed commission met and com- 
menced its work of reorganization. From the above date to the close 
of the fiscal year they worked hard to keep up with their work; 18 
sessions were held in "ivhich 186 cases were passed upon and 8 cases of 
partial disability for permanent work were decided, while 150 cases 
of temporary injuries were decided by the president. At the close of 
the previous year there were 664 cases pending, most of which were 
decided during the year under review, but meanwhile the number of 
cases docketed durmg the year 1919-20, less duplicates, ran up to 
6,880, of which only 1,818 were decided and 5,062 were left pending 
on June 30, 1920. The commission decided during the year 2,433 
cases, but in spite of this rapid rate of work, there were pending 
5,111 cases at the close of the year. 

However, since the close of the fiscal year, a new method of pro- 
cedure has been adopted under the new law which empowers the 
chairman to decide all cases of temporary disability and this will 
greatly expedite the work. 

On June 30, 1920, there were 1,860 employers, with 97,456 work- 
men insured. 

The premiums assessed for 1919-20 amounted to $255,871.95, of 
which sum $231,470.51 represents premiums collected, $2,236.69 sur- 
charges collected, and $19,928.06 were pending collection. During 
the same period compensations amounting to $77,814.41 were paid, 
and $25,449.66 were expended for administration, makhig the lia- 
bilities amount to $103,264.07, which, together with $18.66 refunded 
to employers, makes a grand total of $103,282.73. 

Compensation paid during the year amounted to $165,572.08, $160,- 
378.13 from the general fund, and $5,193.95 from the insular appro- 
priation. 

The total receipts during the fiscal year 1919-20 amounted to $269,- 
116.37, which, added to the balance of $60,108.24 on hand July 1, 1919, 
makes receipts reach a grand total of $329,224.61. The total dis- 
bursements aggregated the sum of $186,176.35, leaving a balance of 
$143,048.26 on June 30, 1920, of which sum $1^3,795.46 corresponds 
to the general fund and $19,252.80 to the insular appropriation. 

The same recommendation of the previous year is made for the 
adoption of a law of security and safety in the industrial plants of 
the island in view of the growing number of accidents. 

Public Service Commission. 

The last fiscal year, the third year of the life of this commission 
has witnessed a marked increase in both the volume and the scope 
of its work. This increase is due to the broadening of the jurisdic- 

14748—20 4 



46 BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

tion of the commission and also to a greater interest in public utilities 
on the part of the people, which in turn is due to a greater abundance 
of capital for investment in such enterprises. 

During the year the commission held 43 regular meetings and nine 
public hearings. The total number of cases filed was 356, an increase 
of 51 as compared with the previous year. There were 273 cases 
disposed of and 83 pending at the close of the year. In this large 
amount of business coming under the consideration of the commis- 
sion there were many questions of real importance and of absorbing 
pubUc interest. 

The most important matter of all was undoubtedly the applica- 
tion made by the American Railroad Co. of Porto Rico for a franchise 
to complete the belt railroad line around the island by taking over 
all the other lines along the route and constructing new lines suffi- 
cient to fill the gaps and link up the whole into a belt line. This 
involved many questions of real difficulty, as well as conflicting 
interests, for example, the cancellation of the franchises of the 
intervening railroads in case of failure to agree with the American 
Railroad Co. for sale or lease of their lines, the necessity of unifica- 
tion of operation, ability of petitioner to carry out the franchise, 
and above all the urgent necessity from the viewpoint of the public 
interest of linking up all these railroads into a belt line around the 
whole island. There resulted a very long consideration by the 
public-service commission with many public hearings and much 
public discussion, at the end of which a franchise was finally enacted, 
with numerous safeguards and limitations, on April 20, 1920. 

This franchise was subsequently approved by the governor. 

As a result of action taken by the commission m regulation of 
water concessions from the Yauco River a community of water 
users of the said river has been organized under the provisions of 
the law of waters. The by-laws, rules, and regulations of this 
Community of water users, fixing the turns for the taking of water 
and providing for inspection and regulation of the whole procedure, 
were approved by the commission December 12, 1919. The scheme 
is now working satisfactorily and with benefit to all parties concerned. 

This is the first organization of the kind created since the change 
of sovereignty in 1899, but it is believed that it may lead to the 
formation of similar bodies in other sections of the island. 

On April 1, 1919, the commission ordered that all lighterage con- 
cerns operating in Porto Rico must secure proper franchises in order 
to continue their business. All such concerns have accordingly 
submitted for consideration by the commission their schedules of 
rates and regulations. These schedules have been approved tem- 
porarily pending a careful study now being made for the purpose 
of making such rates, as far as may be compatible with special local 
conditions, uniform throughout the island. Of a similar nature and 
for a similar purpose was an order issued by the commission on March 
11, 1919, requiring all municipalities operating public utilities to 
submit for approval by the commission the schedule of rates estab- 
lished by them. The schedules submitted in compliance with this 
order show that most of the municipalities have followed in this 
matter a somewhat haphazard and shortsighted policy, placing their 
rates on an unscientific basis, and without due regard to the per- 
manent operation of the utilities in the future. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 4T 

The commission is now engaged in the preparation of uniform 
schedules of rates for the various cities so as to remedy these defects. 

A new duty was placed upon the commission by act N*o. 92 of the 
Legislature promulgated on March 31, 1919, providing for exemptioil 
from taxation of certain new industries for a maximum period of 10 
years. This law provided that the public-service commission should 
determine what industries are entitled to this exemption and for 
how many years. In performing its duties in connection with this 
law, the commission has been guided by a realization of its true 
spirit and purpose. 

There were two other franchises enacted which are of sufficient 
interest to be mentioned, as follows : (1 ) The Arecibo Dock & Shipf)ing 
Co. were authorized to construct an inner harbor in the port of Arecibo. 
This is a new experiment for Porto Rico and the results will be watched 
with interest. (2) A franchise was granted to a private person to 
construct in the harbor of San Juan a large modern pier with bulkhead 
sheds and other improvements. 

Work under this grant has already begun. 

Two applications for an increase of rates by companies operating 
important public utilities created intense public interest. 

One was from the American Railroad Co. for an increase of 20 per 
cent in the freight rates for sugar cane and its products. 

This application encountered great opposition largely because it 
was made at a time when the service was totally paralyzed by a 
strike of the railroad workers, and apparently the grant of this 
increase was made a condition precedent to restoration of the service. 
However, inasmuch as the sugar harvest and other important public 
interests required the immediate restoration of the service, and 
inasmuch as there was much, prima facie evidence that the increase 
of rates was necessary and reasonable, the commission finally granted 
the increase for a period of six months only. This increase was 
made conditional upon the carrying out of a complete technical 
investigation of the accounts and records of both the owning com- 
pany and the leasing company of the railroad for the purpose of 
ascertaining the true capitalization and financial condition of both 
companies, which was to serve as a guide to the commission in all 
questions of rates. This investigation was duly made and its results 
are before the commission. 

The other application was from the Porto Rico Railway, Light & 
Power Co. for an increase of 100 per cent in its rates for passenger 
service on its trollev line from San Juan to Rio Piedras. There was 
of course the usual opposition to this increase on the part of the 
public, especially the laborers, who must use the trolley cars for 
transportation between their homes and their work. The applica- 
tion, after much discussion and long consideration, was finally denied 
by the commission, on the ground that while the rates were at 

f)resent very low, considering the increase in cost of materials and 
abor, they were perhaps commensurate with the quality of the 
service afforded by the company, which has not kept pace with 
growing demands of the cities served. 

Considered as a whole, these activities of the public-service com- 
mission for the past year are not only wide and varied in their scope, 
but also interesting, progressive, and fundamentally important in 
their character. 



48 BEPOBT OF THE GOTEBITOB OF POBTO BIGO 

Insulab Boabd of Elections. 

In accordance with an act of the legislature approved June 25, 
1919, entitled ^'An act to establish the law of registrations and 
elections/' the permanent insular board of elections was organized 
on December 29, 1919, and proceeded to carry out the new election 
law. During the last half of the fiscal year its work was confined 
almost wholly to effecting a new and complete registration of all the 
legal voters in the island m accordance with the strict and somewhat 
complicated requirements of the new law. This work of registration 
was successfully accomplished before June 30, and the number of 
voters registered was 269,363, almost 21 per cent of the entire popu- 
lation enumerated in the census of 1920. All of these registered 
voters are required by the law to vote at the next election under 
severe penalties for noncompliance without a reasonable excuse. 
The report of the insular election board is printed elsewhere in this 
volume. 

Conclusion. 

It is a real pleasure to report that the year covered by this report 
has been one of great progress and prosperity for Porto Rico, and for 
myself personally the work of the year has been attended with 
satisfaction and pleasure, notwithstanding a long and dangerous 
illness. 

I wish to repeat once more my recommendation that the national 
rural credit law now confined in its operation to the continental 
Umted States be extended to Porto Rico. A bill to this effect 

gassed the National House of Representatives at the last session of 
ongress, but has not yet been considered by the Senate. 
The farmers of the island are now better prepared than ever 
before to make a good use of the opportunities that thi^ law would 
afford them, and at the same time they would appreciate this mani- 
festation on the part of Congress of good will and interest in their 
welfare. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Arthur Yager, 
Governor of Porto Rico, 
The Secretary of War, 

Washington J D. C, 



APPENDIXES 



49 



Appendix I. 

EXHIBITS TO THE EEPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOB. 

Exhibit A. 

LEGISLATION. 

List op Acts and Resolutions Passed by the Legislature op Porto Rico, 
Ninth Assembly, Third Special Session, April 26 to May 6, 1920, anp Approved, 
BY the Governor. 

An act to amend sections 6, 7, and 8 of act No. 10, known as the workmen^s accident 
compensation act, approved February 25, 1918, and amended June 19, 1919; approved 
May 6, 1920. 

An act to amend sections 7, 9, 16, 19, 20, 21, and 22 of "An act to authorize the 
issuing of bonds for the purpose of constructing houses for artisans and laborers, pro- 
vide for the leasing of the same, with a certain right to the ownership thereof, improve 
the sanitary condition of certain lands of The People of Porto Rico; promote the crea- 
tion of farms to be leased to farm laborers and to grant them title thereto, and for otilier 
purposes," approved November 27, 1917, as amended by another act approved June 
20, 1919; approved May 6, 1920. 

An act for the incorporation and regulation of cooperative associations of production 
and consumption; approved May 6, 1920. 

An act to cover deficiencies in the appropriations for the insular police for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1920, and for payment of salaries and expenses of special police 
who shall be appointed during the last days of the election period; approved May 6, 
1920. 

An act appropriating the sum of $6,464.60 to reimburse the appropriation for miscel- 
laneous expenditures subject to the approval of the governor, fiscal year 1919-20, in 
such amount as has been allotted therefrom to meet the expenses incurred by reason 
of the visits to this island of members of the United States Congress, and for the recep- 
tion of Gen. Pershing and party; approved May 6, 1920. 

An act to amend sections 1 and 2 of act No. 47, approved June 13, 1919, entitled ** An 
act providing for the construction of a capitol building and for the receipt in the 
treasury of Porto Rico of funds from the liquidation or balance of the food commission 
of Porto Rico, for the sale at public auction of the building generally known aa 
'Diputacion Provincial* and to repeal 'An act to provide funds for the erection of an 
insular building to be known as the Capitol of Porto Rico,' " approved March 12, 1908; 
approved May 12, 1920. 

An act amending that paragraph of section 1 of "An act making appropriations for 
the necessary expenses of carrying on the Government of Porto Rico for the fiscal years 
ending June 30, 1920, and June 30, 1921, respectively, and for other purposes,'* ' 
approved June 20, 1919, which refers to ** Contingent expenses, bureau of suppUes, 
printing, and transportation"; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act to amend paragraphs 22 and 23 of section 18 of the excise tax law of Porto 
Rico, approved June 15, 1919, and for other purposes; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act amending sections 10, 12, 14, 17, 18, 22, 26, 29, 33, 36, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 50, 51 , 54, 57, 58, 62, and 71 of " An act establishing a system of local government 
and reorganizing municipal services," approved July 31, 1919; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act to amend section 2 of act No. 70, of April 13, 1916, as amended by section 49 
of ''An act establishing a system of local government and reorganizing municipal 
services," approved July 31, 1919; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act providing an additional compensation for officers and employees of the 
insular government over and above their salaries, and for expenses for the high school 
of the University of Porto Rico and the San Juan High School, during the fiscal year 
1920-21; approved May 12, 1920. 

51 



52 REPORT or THE GOVERKOR OF PORTO RICO. 

An act providing that all moneys received from pay patients in the insular sanatoriums 
shall constitute a special fund which shall be devoted to the construction of buildings 
in the said sanatonum, and for other purposes; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act to authorize the commissioner of health of Porto Rico to organize a special 
bureau of uncinariasis, providing for the maintenance thereof, and for other purposes; 
approved May 12, 1920. 

An act to amend section 1 of act No. 71, approved June 20, 1919, making appropria- 
tions for the necessary expenses of carrying on the Government of Porto Kico for the 
fiscal years ending June 30, 1920, and June 30, 1921, respectively, and for other pur- 
poses; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act to amend sections 11, 13, 15, 21, 22, 37, 40, 42, 46, 70, 71, and 72 of an act 
entitled ** An act to establish tiie law of r^istrations and elections," approved June 
25, 1919. and to add sections 13a, 13b, 13c, 21a, 22a, 22b, 23a, 23b, 71a, and 97a to the 
aforesaid act, and for otiier purposes; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act to amend the antepenultimate paragraph of section 1 of act No. 71, entitled 
** An act making appropriations for the necessary expenses of carrying on the Govern- 
ment of Porto Rico for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1920, and June 30, 1921, respec- 
tively, and for otiier purposes^" approved June 20, 1910; approved May 12, 1920. 

An act to regulate the administrative and judicial procedure with regard to taxes 
psud under protest, and to repeal the act of March 9, 1911, relative to the same matter; 
approved May 13, 1920. 

An act to amend sections 2 and 3; paragraph 3 of section 8; subdivision (a) of section 
11, and sections 16, 20, 26, 28, 54, 57, and 58 of an act entitled '*An act to provide 
revenues for The People of Porto Rico through the levying of certain income taxes; 
to repeal the act of Congress of the United States of September 8, 1916, amended Octo- 
ber 3, 1917; to repeal section 1 of act No. 8 of the Legislature of Porto Rico, approved 
December 12, 1918, to appropriate the sum of $600,800 for the carrying out of the 
provisions of sections 2, 4, and 5 of the aforesaid act No. 8, and for other purposes, 
approved June 26, 1919, and for other purposes"; approved May 13, 1920. 

An act to authorize the issuing of bonds for the purpose of urbanizing certain lands 
belonging to The People of Porto Rico in the municipality of San Juan, for the pur- 
chase of more land if necessary, for the construction thereon of sewerage, waterworks, 
and lighting systems, for the paving of streets, and for the building of houses for artisans 
and laborers, and for other purposes; approved May 13, 1920. 

JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

Joint resolution authorizing the commissioner of the interior to transfer to the 
municipality of San Juan a strip of land north of the ward of Puerta de Tierra, for 
the construction of a boulevard; approved May 6, 1920. 

Joint resolution to amend the paragraph entitled "University of Porto Rico,*' 
comprised in section 1 of act No. 71, entitled ** An act making appropriations for the 
necessary expenses for carrying on the Government of Porto Kico for the fiscal years 
ending June 30, 1920, and June 30, 1921, respectively, and for other purposes,*' 
approved June 20, 1919; approved May 12, 1920. 

Joint resolution appropnating the sum of $600 for the relief of Juan A. Colon, col- 
lector of internal revenue of Ag[uas Buenas, for damages sustained by him in the con- 
flagration which occurred in said town, while he was engaged in saving public prop- 
erty and funds intrusted to his custody; approved May 12, 1920. 

Joint resolution appropriating the sum of $15,000, or as much thereof as may be 
necessary, for carrying into effect Joint Resolution No. 36, approved June 26, 1919, 
under which is held to be an insular road the road constructed by the municipality 
of Rio Piedras, which starting at Kilometer 13 of the Military Road through the oarrio 
of Monacillos, joins the Guaynabo-San Juan Road, passing by the tuberculosis asylum, 
situated in the said barrio of Monacillos, in the jurisdiction of Rio Piedras; for the 
construction of the main avenue of the said asylum, "Arzuaga Avenue," and for 
other purposes; approved May 12, 1920. 

Joint resolution temporarily to suspend the construction of certain public works 
and to provide funds to carry them out by the creation of a special fund therefor 
making the necessary appropriations; to cancel certain appropriations relative to 
public works and for other obligations, and to cancel the balances of certain appro- 
priations; approved May 12, 1920. 

Joint resolution authorizing the commissioner of the interior, upon compliance with 
legal requirements, to increase by 5 cents the tariff now in effect on private and com- 
mercial telegrams and night letters, devoting the said increase to the maintenance, 
repair, extension, and operation of the insular telegraph and telephone system, and 
for other purposes; approved May 13, 1920. 



BEPORl: OF THE GOVERNOB OF PORTO RICO. 58 

Exhibit B. 
List of Appointments by the Governor Ditring the Fiscal Year 1919-20. 

JUDICIAL appointments. 

District courts: 

Judges and fiscals — 

Augustin E. Font, fiscal, Ponce, July 5, 1919. 

Jose J. Acosta, fiscal, Aguadilla, July 5, 1919. 

Enrique Lloreda, judge, Arecibo, August 12, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Domingo Massari, fiscal, Humacao, December 17, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

Luis Campillo, judge, San Juan, section 1, February 6, 1920; February 17, 
1920. 

Roman Diaz Collazo, fiscal, San Juan, February 18, 1920. 

Santiago B. Palmer, fiscal, Arecibo, April 30, 1920. 
Secretaries — Guayama, June 15, 1920. 
Municipal courts: 

Judges — - 

Adjuntas, January 9, 1920; February 17, 1920. 

Aguadilla, March 11, 1920; May 14, 1920. 

Bayamon, February 24, 1920; April 30, 1920. 

Caguas, May 8, 1920. 

Camuy, May .12, 1920. 

Cayey, August 28, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

Ciales, September 22, 1919; February 17, 1920; May 8, 1920. 

Fajardo, September 29, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

Patillas, September 29, 1919; February 17, 1920; June 3, 1920. 

Ponce, July 5, 1919. 

Rio Grande, May 24, 1920. 

San German, January 9, 1920; February 17, 1920. 

San Juan, July 16, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

San Lorenzo, February 19, 1920. 

San Sebastian, July 5, 1919. 

Vega Baja, May 8, 1920. 

Yauco, August 19, 1919; October 16, 1919; February 18, 1920; April 13, 1920; 
May 12, 1920. 
Secretaries — 

Adjuntas, November 12, 1919. 

Coamo, February 19, 1920. 

Patillas, December 3, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

San German, October 1, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

San Sebastian, February 19, 1920. 

Vega Baja, January 27, 1920; February 17, 1920. 
Marshals — 

Caguas, June 5, 1920. 

Juana Diaz, August 19, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

San Lorenzo, May 8, 1920. 

San Sebastian, February 19, 1920. 

Vega Baja, January 27, 1920; February 17, 1920. 

Yabucoa, May 18, 1920. 
Justices of the peace — 

Aguadilla, February 18, 1920. 

Aibonito, November 7, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Arroyo, November 12, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Barranquitas, December 27, 1919; February 18, 1920; June 16, 1920. 

Cayey, November 7, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Cidra, October 28, 1919; February 18, 1920, 

Comerio, December 3, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Corozal, December 3, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Dorado, November 6, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Guaynabo, October 14, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Hatillo, February 18, 1920. 

Hormigueros, May 8, 1920. 

Humacao, February 19, 1920. 

Isabela, November 7, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

Jayuya, December 12, 1919; February 18, 1920. 



54 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Municipal courts — Continued. 

Justices of the peace — Continued. 

Lajas, December 3, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Las Piedras, November 12, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Loiza, November 6, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Moca, February 18, 1920. 
Morovis, February 18, 1920. 
Naguabo, February 19, 1920. 
Naranjito, November 12, X919; February 18, 1920. 
Penuelas, July 30, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Ponce, May 8, 1920. 

Quebradillas, November 12, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Rincon, December 3, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Rio Grande, February 18, 1920. 

Sabana Grande, December 3, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Salinas, January 30, 1920; February 18, 1920. 
San German, February 18, 1920. 
San Jaun, February 18, 1920. 
• Santa Isabel, April 9, 1920; May 12, 1920. 
Toa Alta, February 18, 1920. 

Toa Baja, November 6, 1919; February 18, 1920; May 8, 1920. 
Vega Alta, November 12, 1919; February 18, 1920. 
Yabucoa, December 3, 1919; February 18, 1920. 

MUNICIPAL APPOINTMENTS — ALCALDES. 



Aguas Buenas, July 8, 1919. 
Caguas, October 16, 1919. 
Fajardo, August 27, 1919. 
Naranjito, September 5, 1919. 



Rincon, October 24, 1919. 
San German, October 25, 1919. 
San Lorenzo, September 25, 1919. 



APPOINTMENTS TO FILL VACANCIES IN MUNIICPAL COUNCILS. 



Adjuntas, 4. 
Aguada, 7. 
Aguadilla, 6. 
A^as Buenas, 4 
Aibonito, 5. 
Anasco, 8. 
Arecibo, 8. 
Arroyo, 8. 
Barceloneta, 5. 
Barranquitas, 4. 
Barros, 4. 
Bayamon, 8. 
Cabo Rojo, 8. 
Caguas, 4. 
Camuy, 4. 
Carolina, 4. 
Cayey, 6. 
Ceiba, 9. 
Ciales, 4. 
Cidra, 8. 
Coamo, 7. 
Comerio, 4. 
Corozal, 4. 
Dorado, 5. 
Fajardo, 10. 



Guanica, 6. 
Guayama, 9. 
Guayanilla, 4. 
Guaynabo, 5. 
Gurabo, 4. 
Hatillo, 4. 
Hormigueros, 4. 
Humacao, 4. 
Isabella, 5. 
Jayuya, 6. 
Juana Diaz, 11. 
Jancos, 4. 
Lajas, 7. 
Lares, 4. 
Las Marias, 12. 
Las Piedras, 8. 
Loiza, 7. 
Luquillo, 6. 
Manati, 5. 
Maricao, 4. 
Maunabo, 4. 
Mayaguez, 12. 
Moca, 4. 
Morovis, 6. 
Naguabo, 7, 



Naranjito, 4. 
Patillas, 7. 
Penuelas, 7. 
Ponce, 12. 
Quebradillas, 5. 
Rincon, 6 
Rio Grande, 6. 
Rio Piedras, 4. 
Sabana Grande, 8 
Salinas, 4. 
San German, 10 
San Juan, 8. 
San Lorenzo, 5. 
San Sebastian, 4. 
Santa Isabel, 11. 
Toa Alta, 5. 
Toa Baja, 13. 
Trujillo Alto, 4. 
Utuado, 8. 
Vega Alta, 6. 
Vega Baja, 6. 
Vieques, 4. 
Villalba, 9. 
Yabucoa, 4. 
Yauco, 12. 



KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 55 

MISCELLANEOUS APPOINTMENTS. 

Board of dental examiners: ' 

Dr. Jose M. Bird, August 9, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

Dr. J. Lorenzo Casalduc, August 11, 1919; February 17, 1920. 
Board of management, Ponce Pier: 

Guillermo Vivas Valdivieso, November 7, 1919. 

Rodulfo del Valle, March 3, 1920; April 30, 1920. 

Arturo Prats, March 3, 1920; April 30, 1920. 
Board of Pharmacy: F. Marquez Roig, July 15, 1919; February 17, 1920. 
Board of review and equalization 

Arturo Lluberas, September 19, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

Arturo Bravo, February 18, 1920. 
Board of trustees, Carnegie Library: Sebastian Siragusa, July 16, 1919; February 

17,1920. 
Commissioners of deeds: 

John Dearborn, New Hampshire, August 29, 1919. 

Ramon Miranda, New York, February 2, 1920. 
Director, Historical Archive of Porto Rico: Ferdinand R. Cestero, November 4, 1919; 

February 17, 1920. 
District chiefs of police: 

Third class, 1. 

Seventh class, 3. 

Eighth class, 9. 
General superivosr of elections: E. W. Keith, September 30, 1919; February 17, 1920. 
Homestead commission: 

Virgilio DavUa, September 5, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

Hermogenes P. Vargas, September 5, 1919; February 17, 1920. 

Rafael Alonso, September 5, 1919; February 17, 1920. 
Institute of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene: 

Pedro Gutierrez Igaravidez, permanent member and director, September 17, 
1919; February 17, 1920. 

Isaac Gonzalez Martinez, permanent member, September 17, 1919; February 17, 
1920. 

Arturo Torrogrosa, physician secretary, July 8, 1919; September 17, 1919; Feb- 
ruary 17, 1920. 

A. Santana Nater, physician for the dispensary, July 8, 1919. 
Insular board of elections; 

Francisco L. Amadeo, December 4, 1919. 

Roberto H. Todd, December 4, 1919. 

Substitute members — 

Rafael Guillermety, May 1, 1920. 
Jose C. 'Carballeira, May'l, 1920. 
Insular police commission: John M. Turner, December 3, 1919. 
Mediation and conciliation commission: 

Emilio del Toro, December 4, 1919. 

T. F. Miranda, December 4, 1919. 

Manuel Paniagua, December 4, 1919. 

Joaquin A. Becerril, December 4, 1919. 

Evangelista Calderon, December 4, 1919. 

Rafael Rivera Zayas, January 23, 1920. 
Municipal boards of agriculture: Mariano Lugo, Guayanilla, March 1, 1920. 
Registrars of property: 

Raul Benedicto, San Juan, section 2, January 27, 1920; February 17, 1920. 

Emgdio S. Ginorio, Arecibo, January 27, 1920; February 17, 1920. 

Pedro Gomez Lasserre, San German, January 27, 1920; February 17, 1920. 

William J. Santos, Caguas, June 16, 1920. 
San Juan Harbor Board: 

Waldemar E. Lee, August 20, 1919. 

Manuel Mendia, May 8, 1920. 
Workmen's relief commission: 

Jose A. Diaz, October 31, 1919; May 20, 1920. 

Luis Samalea Iglesias, May 12, 1920. 

Jose A. Canals, May 20, 1920. 

Abraham Pena, May 20, 1920. , 



56 



REPORT OP THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table I. — Personnel of the insular police of Porto Rico at the close of the fiscal year ending" 
on June SO, 1920, giving also distribution of horses and bicycles in the various districts. 



Districts. 


District 
chief. 


Ser- 
geants. 


Corpo- 


Guards- 
men. 


Detec- 
tives. 


Total. 


Horses. 


Bi- 
cycles. 


Adjimtas .... a 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






2 
3 
11 
3 
2 
6 
22 
4 
4 
2 
3 

22 
5 
9 
3 
4 
9 
3 
3 
2 
3 
4 
2 
3 
3 

10 
6 
15 
4 
3 
4 
3 
14 
2 
7 
2 
2 
8 
6 
3 
3 
2 
3 
6 
2 
10 
2 
2 
27 
2 
2 
5 
1 
4 
3 

37 
3 
3 
3 
11 
2 
5 
6 
3 

132 
3 
4 
2 
5 
1 
8 
3 
6 
8 
2 
5 
6 




23 


8 
4 
12 
4 
3 
8 

25 
5 
5 
3 
4 

27 
6 

12 
4 
5 

11 
4 
4 
3 
4 
5 
3 

28 
4 

12 
8 

18 
5 
4 
4 
4 

15 
3 
9 
3 
3 

'9 
7 
4 
4 
3 
4 
7 
3 

12 
3 
3 

31 
• 3 
3 
6 
2 
5 
4 

42 
4 
4 
4 

13 
3 
7 
6 
4 
143 
4 
5 
3 
6 
2 
9 
4 
7 

10 
2 
6 
8 






Aguada 






1 
1 


1 


Aguadilla 






1 


Aguas Buenas 








Aibonito 1 










Anasco 


1 


2 


2 
2 

1 
2 


1 


Arecibo 


2 


Arroyo 


3 


Barceloneta 






2 


Barranquitas 




1 




Barros .'. [ 


1 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 








Bayamon 


1 


2 


1 

i' 


3 


.CaBoRojo 


1 


Caguas 




2 


2 


Camuy 




nftToiiTift -. 






1 

2 


1 


Cavev 




1 
1 


2 


^Ks^.::::::::::::::::::::::::::::.. 


1 


Ciales 


1 






Cidra 




i 






OoaiTio - - -,...,,,., r , 


1 




1 




Comerio 




1 




Corozal 


1 

1 




1 




Detective Bureau 


1 
1 

i" 


i* 

1 
1 


2 


Dorado 




Fajardo 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
2 


1 


Guanica 


1 


Ouayaw^a . ....... -r . ^ . -r 


1 


Guayanilla 


1 


Gurabo 








Guaynabo 






i* 


1 


Hfttfllo - 






1 
1 




Headquarters 






a 


Honnigueros 


1 
1 
1 






TTiimaoao » ■, 




1 


3 

1 


2 


Isabela 


1 


Jayuya 


1 








1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


2 

i* 


a 


Juncos 






1 


Lajas 








Lares 








LasMarias 










Las Piedras 




1 






Loiza 


1 
1 
1 







1 


Luquillo 








Manati ! 




1 
1 




i* 

1 

3 


2 


Maricao 




Maunabo 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 




1 


Mavamiez 


1 


2 


a 


Moca... 




Morovls 










Naguabo 






1 




Naranjito 




1 




Patilli 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




1 
1 
1 


1 


Penuelas 






1 


Ponce 


2 


2 


a 


Ouebradlilfls 


1 


Rincon 








Rio Grande 










Rio Piedras 


1 




1 
1 
1 

i" 

7 


2 


Sabana Grande 


1 


Salinas 




1 


4 


Ban OerniaTi .-r .-^--..^. 


1 


San Lorenzo 


1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 








San Juan 


2 


7 


a 


San Sebastian .' 




Santa Isabel 






2 


2 


Toa Alta 








Toa Baja 








1 


TmlilloAlto 








Vtuado 






i" 

1 

2 


1 


VegaAlta 








VcIftBaia 








Vieques 




1 


1 


Villalba 




Yabucoa 


1 
1 






1 
2 




Yauco 


1 




2 






Total 


65 


13 


34 


558 


23 


693 


56 


68 







Remarks. ^Chiet of insular police, the adjutant, and the chief of detectives are detached at the Police 
HMkdquarters, San Juan. At the close of the fiscal year, there were 23 vacancies in the force, consisting of 
1 fourth-class district chiefs 2 seventh-class district chiefs, 1 sergeant, and 19 guardsmen. 



BEPOBT OF THE GOVERNOE OF POETO EICO. 



57 



Table II. — Number of felonies committed by both sexes during the fiscal year ending 

June SOj 1920. 



Crimes. 



Adultery 

Arson 

Attempt to murder 

Bigamy 

Burglary 

Cattle stealing 

Conspiracy- 

Crime against public health and security . 

€rime against nature 

Embezzlement of public funds 

Falsification 

<jrand larceny * 

Homicide 

Incest 

Mayhem 

Murder 

Hape 

Riot.. 



Seduction.., 
Total. 



Acquitted. 



Men. Women. 



174 



Sentenced. 



Men. Women. 



7 
1 

11 

2 

209 



474 



10 



Total. 



19 • 

5 
13 

2 
234 
31 

8 
45 

8 

3 
14 
46 
19 

1 
12 
16 
13 
155 
19 



663 



RECAPITULATION. 

Cases tried, males 648 

Cases tried, females 15 

Grand total 663 

Table III. — Number of arrests made^ convictions, and acquittals , during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1920, for the following offenses and crimes. 



Crimes. 



Acquitted. 



Men. 



Women. 



Sentenced. 



Men. 



Women. 



Totals. 



Men. 



Women, 



Abuse of confidence 

Adultery 

Advertisement law, violation of 

Animals, cruelty to 

Arson 

Article 287, Penal Code, violation of. 
Article 289, Penal Code, violation of., 
Article 300, Penal Code, violation of.. 
Article 305, Penal Code, violation of.. 
Article 328, Penal Code, violation of.. 
Article 345, Penal Code, violation of.. 
Article 388, Penal Code, violation of.. 
Article 438, Penal Code, violation of . 
Article 519, Penal Code, violation of.. 
Article 553, Penal Code, violation of.. 

Assault 

Assault and battery 

Automobile law, infraction of 



Birds' law, violation of 

Burglary 

Cattle stealing 

Caution 

Conspiracy , 

Court, contempt to 

Embezzlement of jDublic funds 

Excise tax, infraction of 

Executive power, crime committed by or against 



the.. 



Exposures, indecent 

Falsification 

False pretense 

Gambling » 

Health and safety, crime against the public. . 



97 

13 

318 

417 



1 
146 

3 
20 

9 

19 

1,435 

13 



145 
7 
1 

688 
1 
3 



1 

10 

18 

496 

22 

1,252 

1,508 

2 

13 

209 

28 

1 



6 

2 

306 

2 

29 
6 



31 



155 
10 
1 

753 
5 
3 
1 

125 
1 
9 



1 

24 

18 

593 

35 

1,570 

1.925 

2 

18 

233 

31 

1 



452 

5 

49 

14 

115 

10,265 



3 

108 
5 



44 



1 
71 



58 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table III. — Number of arrests made, convictions, and acquittals, during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1920, for the following offenses and crimes — Continued. 



Crimes. 



. Homicides 

Illegal assembly 

Incest 

Insanity, dangerous 

Internal revenue law, violation of 

Justice, crime against public 

Labor law, violation of 

Larceny, grand 

Larceny, petit 

Larceny (sec. 444- A, Penal Code) 

Libel 

Lottery tickets, sale of 

Malicious damages 

Mayhem 

Medicine, illegal, practice of 

Minors, corruption of 

Minors, neglect of 

Minors, working of 

Murders 

Murder, attempt to commit 

Nature, crime against 

Ordinances, violations of municipal 

Organic law, violation of 

Other crimes 

Peace, disturbance of the 

Pharmacy law, violation of 

Postal law, violation of 

Profanation national flag 

Prostitution 

Regulations on docks and harbors 

Rape 

Riot 

Road law, violation of 

Sanitary law, violation of 

Seduction 

Schoollaw, violation of 

Slander , 

Smuggling 

Weapons, carrying deadly , 

Weights and measures, violation of law of , 



Total 5,60B 



Acquitted. 



Men. Women. 



1 

1 

24 

160 

8 

269 

16 

2 



6 

8 

2 

4 

652 

132 

14 

1,085 

3 

1 

' 1 

1 



6 
68 
30 
151 

1 

10 
10 



135 
45 



125 
4 



570 



Sentenced. 



Men. Women. 



11 
2 
1 

25 
5 

35 
112 

37 
1,355 

49 
3 
7 

59 I 
8 ' 
5 ' 

20 i 



6 

6 : 

11 ! 

4 
5,358 ; 
230 : 

88 ! 

4,341 ; 



2 '. 

2 '. 

7 '. 

86 '. 

636 . 

1,082 

"it 

1,370 i 

199 j 



39 



559 

6 

7 

1,066 



109 



29,024 I 2,004 



Totals. 



Men. Women. 



19 
12 

1 
26 

6 
59 
272 
45 
1,624 
65 

5 

7 
124 
12 

7 
23 



12 

14 

13 

8 

6,010 

362 

102 

5,426 

3 

7 

1 

3 

2 

13 

154 

666 

1,233 

19 

25 

22 

4 

1,505 

244 



34,630 



12 



2 
20 

1 

4g 
1 



684 

10 

13 

1,346 



1 

8 

139 



11 
1 



2,574 



RECAPITULATION. 

Men arrested 34,630 

Women arrested 2, 574 

Cases pending 2,336 

Grand total 39,540 

During the year there were 168 suicides and 120 attempts to suicide. 

Note.— Arrests by warrants, of escaped prisoners and persons requisitioned for and found, not contained 
in the above statement, amounted to 3,317. 



EEPOET OF THE GOVEBNOB OF POBTO BICO. 



59 



Table IV. — Number of fires which took place in Porto Rico during the fiscal year 1919-^Oy 
number of deaths caused thereby^ number of and description of property destroyed or dcm- 
aged, insurance carried, and the approximate amount of loss. 



District. 


Death. 


Property. 


Insur- 
ance. 


Approxi- 
mate loss. 


Aguada 




1 house 




$200 


Do 




1 house and furniture 




8,000 


Do 




Ihut 




80 


Aguas Buenas 




25 houses, 6 stores 


$10,000 


45, 760 


Do 




1 house 


216 


Do 




Ihut 




40 


Aibonito 




1 tobacco shed 




1,000 


Do 




1 house . 




300 


Do 




1 hut. 1 sack coffee familv household' 




70 


Do 




Ihut . 




25 


Arecibo 




1 store 


5,000 


G) 


Do 




1 house 


0) 


Do 




2 huts 




200 


Do 




do 




150 


Do 




1 shed 




120 


Do 




1 house 




800 


Arroyo 




1 shed 




25 


Barceloneta 




2 huts 




100 


Do 




do 




60 


Do 




3 huts 




300 


Barranquitas 




Ihut 




100 


Do 




..do 




130 


Barros 




do 




25 


Do 




1 shed 




40 


Cabo Rojo 




1 blacksmith shop 




4,000 


Do 




1 shed and tools 






Caguas.. 




1 house 




160 


Do 




1 hut and furniture 




100 


Do 




1 house 




150 


Do 




1 tobacco shed and tobacco warehouse. 
Ished 


10,000 


800 


Do 




500 


Do 




1 house and store 


31,000 


25,000 


Do... . 


1 


1 hut and household 


87 


Do 


3 tobacco storehouses 


142, 971 


8,000 


Camuy 




45 houses, 2 stores, merchandise and 
^furniture. 
1 house 


109,350 


Carolina 




500 


750 


Do 


1 


1 hut and household 


50 


Ceiba. 


Ihut 




50 


Do 




1 house 




175 


Do 




do 




100 


Cidra 


1 


1 hut and household 




130 


Coamo 


Ihut 




25 


Comerio 




1 store 


20,000 


5,000 


Do 




1 motor truck 


5,000 


Fajardo 




1 lighter and 60 bags sugar 


2,340 
5,000 
1,000 


3,000 


Guanica 




1 warehouse 


5,000 


Do 




1 storehouse 


1,000 


Gurabo 




1 tobacco shed 


3,000 


Do 




1 hut 




50 


Do 




1 automobile 


800 
1,500 


1,200 


Guayama 




1 house 


150 


Do 




1 house and tools 


3,825 


ToaBaja 




1 hut 




25 


TrujilU) Alto 




... do 




30 


Do 




do 




70 


Do 




do 




40 


Do 




1 hut and household 




130 


Do....:.::...::::: : : 




1 house 




225 


Utuado 




1 hut and furniture 




70 


Do 




1 house 




150 


Do 




Ihut 




75 


Do 




1 tobacco shed 




600 


VegaBaja 




1 tobacco warehouse 




900 


Vieques 




1 warehouse, 12,074 sacks of sugar, 
20,000 empty sacks, 30 barrels grease, 
etc. 

1 house ... .... 


223, 369 


249, 338 


Yauco 




G) 


Do 




Ihut 




^^ 10 












Total 


5 


635. 790 


593, 854 











I Amount not given. 



60 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table V. — Number of persons arrested for illicit traffic with alcohol, also giving number 
J of stills and quantity of liquor seized j during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920. 



District. 


Stills 
seized. 


Persons 
arrested. 


Quarts 
of liquor 
seized. 


Persons 
arrested. 


Remarks. 


Adjuntas 


6 
8 


6 
8 


1 

5 

3 
147J 
25i 

37i 
37 
9 


2 
2 
2 

21 
4 
2 

11 
5 
2 


4 sentenced, 2 acquitted, 2 pending. 


Aguada 


1 sentenced, 3 acquitted, 6 pending. 


Aguas Buenas 


1 acquitted, 1 pending. 


Aguadilla 


13 
8 
4 
3 
4 


17 
10 
4 
4 
3 


9 sentenced, 12 acquitted, 17 pending. 


Albonito 


5 sentenced, 3 acquitted, 6 pending. 


Anasco 


1 sentenced, 1 acquitted, 4 pending. 


Arecibo 


9 sentenced, 6 pending. 


Arroyo 


3 sentenced, 5 pending. 


Barceloneta 


2 sentenced. 


Barranquitas 


1 


1 


1 pending. 


Barros 


15 
172 

21J 
220 

8 
59 
32J 

284i 

103 

2i 

227 

f 

31 

15i 

34i 

17i 
5i 


4 

30 

5 

70 
2 
6 
4 
5 
1 
8 
5 
4 
2 
3 
13 
2 
9 
1 
5 
2 


2 acquitted, 2 pending. 

10 sentenced, 8 acquitted, 16 pending. 


Bayamon 


3 

1 
8 
2 
7 
8 
6 
1 
4 
9 
1 


4 
1 
9 
3 
7 
5 
7 
2 
3 
7 
1 


Cabo Rojo 


1 sentenced, 5 pending. 


Caguas 


24 sentenced, 22 acquitted, 33 pending. 


Camuy 


2 sentenced, 1 acquitted, 2 pending. 


Carolina 


7 sentenced, 6 pending. 


Cayev 


3 sentenced, 1 acquitted, 5 pending. 


ceiiS::::::;:::::::::::: 


3 sentenced, 7 acquitted, 2 pending. 


dales 


1 acquitted, 2 pending. 


Cidra 


4 sentenced, 6 acquitted, 1 pending. 


Coamo 


6 sentenced, 1 acquitted, 5 pending. 


Comerio 


2 sentenced, 3 pending. 


Oorozal 


1 acquitted, 1 pending. 


Dorado 






3 pending. 


Fajardo 


42 
4 
9 


47 
3 
16 


25 sentenced, 22 acquitted, 13 pending. 

1 acquitted, 4 pending. 

2 sentenced, 14 acquitted, 9 pending. 


Ouanica 


Guay ama 


Guayanilla 


1 acquitted. 


Guaynabo 


5 
2 

1 
1 
9 
1 
1 
15 
13 
1 


4 
4 
3 
1 

10 
2 
1 

17 
14 
1 


3 sentenced, 5 acquitted, 1 pending. 


Gurabo 


1 sentenced, 2 acquitted, 3 pending. 


Hatillo 


3 pending. 


TTornniVneros . . . 






1 pending. 


Humacao 


143 

1* 

114J 

216 

6 

14i 


13 
1 
1 

13 
19 
1 
3 


6 sentenced, 6 acquitted, 11 pending. 


Isabela 


2 acquitted, 1 pending. 


Jayuya 


2 acquitted. 


Juana Diaz 


6 sentenced, 13 acquitted, 11 pending. 


Juncos 


3 sentenced, 10 acquitted, 20 pending. 


Lajas 


1 sentenced, 1 pending. 


Lares 


3 pending. 


L«as Marias . 


1 
5 
8 
5 
1 

10 
7 
8 


1 
7 
8 
4 
1 

15 
4 
8 


1 pending. 


Las Piedras-. . 






5 sentenced, 2 acquitted. 


Loiza 


63 
3i^ 
26i 
83| 
167 

m 

15 

296 

11 

265 

9 

20 
15 
26 
10 
24 

5 
13 
44 

8^ 
722 

2 


3 
1 
5 

11 

23 
3 
5 

14 
3 
3 

31 
1 
6 
3 
2 
3 
8 
2 

14 
6 
6 

57 
1 


4 sentenced, 4 acquitted, 3 pending. 


Luquillo 


2 sentenced, 3 pending. 


Manati 


4 sentenced, 2 pending. 


Maunabo 


7 sentenced, 13 acquitted, 6 pending. 


Mayairuez 


11 sentenced, 13 acquitted, 3 pending. 


Moca 


1 sentenced, 10 pending. 


Morovis 


2 sentenced, 3 pending. 


Naguabo 


13 

7 

6 

100 


14 

12 

8 

110 


5 sentenced, 8 acquitted, 15 pending. 


Patillas 


7 sentenced, 6 acquitted, 2 pending. 


Penuelas 


4 sentenced. 2 acquitted, 5 pending. 


Ponce 


62 sentenced, 20 acquitted, 59 pending. 


Quebradillas 


1 pending. 


RIncon 






1 sentenced, 1 acquitted, 4 pending. 


Rio Grande 


2 

15 

1 

4 

3 

10 

4 

5 

31 


3 
13 

1 
4 
4 

18 
6 
9 

33 


Do. 


Rio Piedras 


2 sentenced, 5 acquitted, 8 pending. 


Sabana Grande 


1 sentenced, 1 acquitted, 2 pending. 


Salinas 


1 sentenced, 4 acquitted, 7 pending. 


San German 


1 sentenced, 3 acquitted, 2 pending. 
9 sentenced, 11 acquitted, 12 pending. 


San Lorenzo 


Santa Isabel 


4 sentenced, 5 acquitted, 3 pending. 


San Sebastian 


3 sentenced, 8 acquitted, 4 pending. 


San Juan 


25 sentenced, 16 acquitted, 49 pending. 


ToaAlta 


1 pending. 


Tniiillo Alto 


3 
5 
1 

1 
15 

4 
25 

7 


6 
5 
1 
1 

17 
3 
36 
10 


2 sentenced, 2 acquitted, 2 pending. 


Utuado 


6J 


3 


4 sentenced, 2 acquitted, 2 pending. 


Vega Alta 


1 pending. 


VegaBaja/.I!!!!. !!.!!.. 


10? 
26 
115 
125i 


2 
8 


3 pending. 


Vieques 


16 sentenced, 9 pending. 


Villalba . 


1 sentenced, 2 pending. 


Yabucoa 


15 
4 


24 sentenced, 19 acquitted, 8 pending. 
6 sentenced, 4 acquitted, 4 pending. 


Yauco 


Total 


508 


587 


4,332^ 


526 









Persons arrested. 

Sentenced 

Acquitted 

Cases pending.... 

Total 



RECAPITULATION. 



1,113 



35 
300 
456 

1,113 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 61 

Exhibit D. 

List op Franchise Ordinances Passed by the Public Service Commission and 
Approved by the Governor of Porto Rico. 

An ordinance granting to the municipality of Vieques authority to construct, main- 
tain, and operate an electric plant and distributing system in Vieques. Approved 
July 9, 1919. 

An ordinance granting a revocable permit to Alfredo Ramirez Resell to take and 
use for irrigation purposes 800 gallons of water per minute from the Estero River in 
the municipality of Cabo Rojo. Approved July 9, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Agustin Lledo authority to maintain and operate a lighter- 
tige business in the harbors of Ponce and Descalabrado (Santa Isabel). Approved 
July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Ernesto Moringlane authority to maintain and operate 
a lighterage business in and between the harbors of Ponce, Guayanilla and Desca- 
labrado (Santa Isabel). Approved July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to tne Mayaguez Dock & Shipping Co. authority to maintain 
and operate a lighterage business in the harbor of Mayaguez. Approved July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to the Aguadilla Light, Storage & Transportation Co. authority 
to maintain and operate a lighterage business in the narbor of Aguadilla. Approfved 
July 16, 1919. (Repealed July 1, 1920.) • 

An ordinance granting to the Ponce & Guayama Railway Co. authoritv to maintain 
and operate a lighterage business in the harbor of Jobos. Approved July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Remedios Co. of Ponce authority to maintain and operate 
•& lighterage business in the harbor of Ponce. Approved July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Sobrinos de Ezquiaga authority to maintain and operate 
a lighterage bueflness in the harbor of San Juan. Approved July 16, 1919.^ 

An ordinance granting to Sucrs. de A. J. Alcaide & Co. authority to maintain and 
operate a lighterage business in the harbor of Arroyo. Approved July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Hijos de J. Bird Leon Sucrs. authority to maintain and 
operate a lighterage busmess in the harbor of Fajardo. Approved July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to the Ponce Lighter Co. authority to maintain and operate 
a lighterage business in the harbors of Ponce, Guanica, Santa Isabel, and Descala- 
brado. Approved July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Guillermo Frontera authority to maintain and operate a 
lighterage business in the harbors of Aguadilla and Corsica (Rincon). Approved 
July 16, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to C. & J. Fantauzzi authority to maintain and operate a 
lighterage business in the harbor of Arroyo. Approved July 28, 19l9. 

An ordinance granting to the Mayag[uez Dock & Shipping Co. authority to main- 
tain and operate a lighterage business in the harbor of Corsica (Rincon). Approved 
July 28, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Martin Figueroa Rosario authority to maintain and operate 
a lighterage business in the harbor of Aguadilla. Approved July 28, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to F. Fernandez & Co. S. en C. authority to maintain and 
operate a lighterage business in the harbor of Humacao. Approved July 28, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Cecilio Nieves Perez authority to maintain and operate 
a lighterage business in the harbor of Aguadilla. Approved July 28, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Juan y Onofre Torres y Delgado a revocable permit to 
take and use for industrial purposes 40 liters of water per second from the Duey River 
in the municipality of Yauco. Approved July 28, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Luis A. McDougald authority to construct, maintain, and 
operate an electric plant in Guanica. Approved July 28, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to the Cayey Light & Ice Co. authority to use not to exceed 
100 cubic feet of water per second from the Plata River, for the development of elec- 
tric energy; and to construct, maintain, and operate an electric plant and distributing 
flystem in Ciayey and Cidra. Approved August 8, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to F. A. Gonzales authority to maintain and operate a lighter- 
age business in and between the harbors of Ponce, Guayanilla, and Santa Isabel. 
Approved August 18, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Sucesores de Abarca authority to construct, maintain, 
and operate «i electric plant in San German and electric distributing system in San 
German fljid Lajas. Approved August 20, 1919. 

An ordinance granting a revocable permit to Russell & Co., S. en C. Sucrs., to take 
and use for irrigation purposes 92 liters of water per second from the Estero River in 
the municipality of Cabo Rojo. Approved September 9, 1919. 

1^4S—20 5 



62 REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOB OF PORTO RICO. 

An ordinance granting to the Compania Popular de Transporte (Inc.) authority to» 
maintain and operate a gasoline ferry service in the harbor of San Juan , between 
San Juan and Catano. Approved November 8, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to the Estate of Adolfo Hau a revocable permit to take and 
use for industrial purposes 272 liters of water per second from the Maricao River 
in the municipality of Maricao. Approved October 11, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to the municipality of Hatillo authority to construct, main- 
tain, and operate an electric plant and distributing system in Hatillo. Approved 
October 14, 1919. 

An ordinance amending an ordinance entitled ''An ordinance authorizing the- 
Compania de Fuerza Hidroelectrica de Ponce to construct, maintain, and operate a 
hydroelectric plant and to use for that purpose the total flow of water of the Inabou' 
River." Approved October 14, 1919. 

An ordinance repealing an ordinance entitled "An ordinance amending an ordi- 
nance entitled 'An ordinance granting a revocable permit to Fernandez Hermanos' 
to take and use for industrial purposes 450 liters of water per second from the Lo^ 
Vegas Rivera.' " Apj)roved October 20, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to the Yabucoa Sugar Co. authority to maintain and opr 
erate a lighterage business in the harbor of Yabucoa. Approved October 24, 1919: 

An ordinance granting to Garzot & Fuertes, of Naguabo, authority to maintain 
and operate a li^terage business in the harbor of Naguabo and between the harbors- 
of Naguabo and Humacao. Approved October 29, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Central Paste Viejo (Inc.) authority to maintain and 
operate a lighterage business in the harbor of Humacao. Approved October 29, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Arecibo Dock & Shipping Co. of Arecibo a franchise ta 
construct, maintain ana operate an inner harbor in the harbor of Arecibo and all 
appurtenances thereto and to establish, maintain, and operate a lighterage service- 
in said harbor. Approved November 11, 1919. 

An ordinance granting a revokable permit to Domingo Soto Almodovar to take 
and use for irrigation purposes 21.37 liters of water per second from the Estero River 
or Rio Grande de San German, in the municipality of San German. Approved 
November 25, 1919. 

An ordinance granting a revocable permit to the Texas Co. to lay and maintain a 
steel pipe-line leading from its tank in Puerta de Tierra to the bulkhead and piers 
Nos. 2 8Jid 5 in the water front of San Juan, P. R., for the furnishing of fuel oil. Ap- 
proved December 20, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to the mimicipality of Aguadilla authority to construct,. 
maintain, and operate an electric distributing system in Aguadilla. Approved De- 
cember 20, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Juan and Onofre Torres y Delgado a revocable permit 
to take and use for industrial purposes 350 liters of water per second from the Vega& 
River in the municipality of Yauco. Approved December 20, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to Remigio Bourgeois e Irigoyen and Francisca Irigoyen y 
Garcia, a revokable permit to take and use for domestic purposes 20,000 gallons of 
water per week from the Marueiio River in the mimicipality of Ponce. Approved 
December 22, 1919. 

An ordinance granting to F. Benitez Rexach authority to construct, maintain, and 
operate a public service bulkhead, sheds, warehouses, and all appurtenances thereto- 
in the harbor of San Juan, on that portion of the water front lying between Turner 
Street and the San Antonio Dock. Approved March 10, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to the West India Oil Co. a revocable permit to lay 
and maintain two undergroimd pipe lines leading from its tank in Puerto de Tierra 
to the bulkhead at points situated near piers Nos. 2 and 5 on the water front of San^ 
Juan for the carrying of gasoline and kerosene. Approved February 3, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to Isabel and Juan Muraty and Alejandro Garmendia a 
revocable permit to take and use for irrigation purposes 17 liters and 40 centiliters of 
water per second from Estero River in the municipality of Hormigueros. Approved 
February 3, 1920. 

An ordinance ^nting to Jose Rossello Fernandez authority to maintain and operate 
a lighterage busmess iu the harbor of Guayanes, Yabucoa. Approved February 3,. 

An ordinance granting to W. McK. Jones a revocable permit to take and use for 
industrial purposes 144 liters of water per second from the Achiote Creek in the muni- 
cipality of Villalba. Approved February 5, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to Eduardo and Enrique Gonzalez y Rodriguez a revocable 
permit to take and use for irrigation purposes 60 liters of water per second from the- 
Herrerae River in the municipality of Rio Grande. Approved March 10, 1920. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



63 



An ordinance granting to Juan and Onofre Torres y Delgado a revocable permit to 
take and use for irrigation purposes 30 liters of water per second from the Duey River 
in the municipality of Yauco. Approved March 10, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to Angehno Antongiorgi a revocable permit to take and use 
for irrigation purposes 15 liters of water per second from the Yauco River in the munici- 
pality of Yauco. Approved March 11, 1920. 

An ordinance grantmg to Angelino Antongiorgi a revocable permit to take and use 
for irrigation purposes 50 liters of water per second from the Yauco River. Approved 
March 11, 1920. . ^ . 

An ordinance granting to the American Railroad Co. of Porto Rico authority to 
construct, maintain, and operate such railroad lines as may be necessary to complete 
the belt raikoad line around the eastern side of the island ; to make operating agree- 
ments with the public -service companies at present operating railroad lines, to be 
linked and operated as a part of the belt railroad system and for other purposes. Ap- 
proved June 2, 1920. 

An ordinance panting a revocable permit to the Suear Products Co. to lay and mam- 
tain a molasses pipe line across the maritime zone in the harbor of Ponce. Approved 
April 5, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to Arturo Llub^ras a revocable permit to take and use for 
irrigation purposes 18 liters and 20 centiliters of water per second from the Yauco 
Riv«r in tne municipalities of Yauco and Guayanilla. Approved April 8, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to Arturo Lluberas, and Manuel, Francisco, Antonio, Rosa,. 
Elena, Celia, Graciela and Racjuel Lluberas Pasarell a revocable permit to take and 
use for irrigation purposes 3 liters of water per second from the Yauco River in 
the municipality of Guayanilla. Approved April 8, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to Edmund Block a revocable permit to take and use for 
irrigation purposes 19 liters and 2 deciliters of water per second from an unknown 
tributary of the Santa Catalina Creek in the municipality of Bayamon. Approved 
June 2, 1920. 

An ordinance granting to Sucesion de Mateo Luchetti y Tristany a revocable per- 
mit to take and use for irrigation purposes 62 liters of water per second from the Yauco 
River in the municipality of Yauco. Approved May 24, 1920. 

Exhibit E. 

Statistical Data Concerning Civil Service Operations During the Fiscal 

Year 1919-20. 

Table A. — Results of examination. 



Examination. 


Num- 
ber of 
appli- 
cants. 


Appli- 
cations 
can- 
celed. 


Failed 
to re- 
port. 


Pend- 
ing. 


Num- 
ber 
exam- 
ined. 


Passed. 


Failed. 


Per 

cent 

passed. 


Ap- 
point- 
ments. 


Accountant and bookkeeper i 


4 

6 
45 
1 
5 
5 
2 
14 

1 
1 

12 

1 

111 

12 
267 
7 
152 
7 
3 

23 
4 
1 
4 
2 
1 
3 
2 
6 
7 

10 


1 
3 


2 




2 

6 

37 
1 
5 
5 
2 
8 

1 
1 

11 
1 

106 
12 

229 
7 

132 
6 
3 
19 
3 
1 
4 
2 
1 
3 
2 
6 
4 
9 


29' 

1 
5 
5 
1 
8 

1 

1 

10 

1 

58 

10 

144 
5 

103 
4 
1 
8 
3 
1 
2 

i* 

2 
1 
5 

1 
4 


2 

5 

8 



i' 

i" 

"*'"48* 
2 

85 
2 

29 
2 
2 

11 

2 

2 

i' 

1 

3* 

5 






Accountant and bookkeeper, assist- 
ant* 






Assessor and internal revenue agent^. 
Bacteriologist ^ 


5 




78.38 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 

50.00 
100.00 

100.00 
100.00 
90.91 
100.00 
54.72 
83.33 
62.88 
71.43 
78.03 
66.67 
33.33 
42.11 
100.00 
100.00 
50.00 


10 
1 


Barber 










Bookbinder . . . . . . , 








2 


Chainman i 










Chauffeur 


2 




4 


2 


Chief, Bureau of Transmissible Dis- 
eases and Statistics i 


1 


Chief, Assistant, Bureau of Supplies i. . 
Civil engineer, assistant i 








1 


1 






7 


Do.12..., 








Clerk, first gradei 




5 




9 


Do.12 




Clerk, second grade i 


1 


37 




28 


Do 12 




Clerk, third grade i 


4 


16 

1 




14 


Clerk, Registry of Property i 


3 


Clerk in charge of auto licenses i 


1 


Collector of internal revenue i 

Compositor 


i' 


4 




4 
6 


Curator of museum i 






1 


Draftsman, apprentice, architectural i . 








1 


Draftsman, junior, architectural i 










Draftsman, architectural i 






*" 


100.00 
66.67 
50.00 

100.00 
26.00 
44.44 


1 


Draftsman, junior, topographical i 

Draftsman, topographicaU 








2 










Engine driver i 


■"■'2" 


1 
1 

1 




1 


Examiuer of accounts i 


1 


Examiner of collectors' offices 





64 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF POBTO RICO. 



Table A.— 


Results of examinaiion- 


-Continued 








Examination. 


Num- 
berof 
appli- 
cants. 


Appli- 
cations 
can- 
celed. 


Failed 
tore- 
port. 


Pend- 
ing. 


Num- 
ber 
exam- 
ined. 


Passed. 


Failed. 


Per 
cent 

passed. 


point- 
ments. 


Examiner of the granting of auto li- 
censes - 


3 
19 
26 
2 
5 
6 
4 

6 
3 
1 
3 

9 
11 
33 

1 

4 
7 
1 
15 
24 
2 
7 
9 
3 
1 
7 
1 








3 
18 
24 
2 
5 
6 
3 

4 
3 

1 
3 
6 
9 
22 
1 
4 
6 


2 
11 
10 
2 
5 
6 
2 

i* 

i* 

2 

1 
7 
1 
3 
2 


1 
7 
14 

i* 

4 
2 
1 
2 
4 
8 
15 

i' 

4 


66.67 
61.11 

41.67 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 

66.67 


1 


Forest eruard 


1 
2 






2 


Forest inspector 






2 


Melioeranher 








!tiisi>ector dCTiciiltur&l 








1 


Inspector, agricultural, assistant 

Inspector, building construction i 

Jnstoector. building construction, as- 








6 




1 

1 




2 


l!ist>ector foods and drucs ^ 


33.33 




; nspeccor, gas and water meters i 
















66.67 
33.33 
11.11 
31.82 
100.00 
75.00 
33.33 


1 


Inspector public works i 


i' 

5 


3 
1 

6 




1 


ndpector, public works, assistant ^ — 

nspector, weights and measures i 

nspector. Department of Justice i 

: nstructor of gymnastics and drill 

Internal revenue agent, coffee expert i . 
Internal revenue agent, tobacco expert^ 
Janitor . . 


7 

1 












1 


"i' 


1 


2 
4 




13 

18 
2 
7 
9 
3 
1 
7 


n 

9 

1 
1 

t 

1 

7 


9' 

1 
6 


100.00 
50.00 
50.00 
14.29 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 


6 


Labor insnectori 


2 




6 




1 


Leveleri 








1 


Lineman . 








2 


Local biiver ^ 








1 










1 


Matron . . • . 
















.. 1 




















4 


Master tailor 




















2 


Nurse . 


12 
5 
11 

1 
2 
4 

13 
7 
6 
2 

58 
2 

55 

8 
2 

2 
1 

71 
7 
5 
4 

71 
3 
7 
6 
3 


2 






10 
5 

2 
3 
9 
6 
6 
2 

45 
2 

44 
3 
125 
1 
7 
2 

2 
1 

67 
7 
5 
4 

63 
3 
7 
2 
3 


10 

1 

i' 

1 
1 

2 
6 
6 
2 

28 
2 

24 
2 

23 

5 

2 

2 

1 
25 
7 
3 
3 
26 
1 
7 
1 
3 


....... 

i* 

2 

7 



""u 

""20 

1 

102 

1 

2 

"**42* 

2* 

1 

37 

2 

i' 


100.00 
20.00 

*i66.'66' 

50.00 

33.33 

'ioo'oo' 
100.00 
100.00 

62.20 
100.00 
54.55 
66.67 
18.40 


1 


Overseer ^ ........ 






1 


Overseer assistant i 






...... 


2 


Patholoelst i . 









1 


Pharmacist^ • • 








1 


Phvsician and alienist ^ 


i* 


1 
4 






Police capataz* 


3 


Practicante 


2 


Practlcante leoer colonv 








PrfissTnan . . . * . 








3 


Prison sruard* . 


8 


5 




14 




1 


Road foreman ^ 


3* 


11 

1 
9 




18 


B, odmaii ^ .•*..•.••... 


5 


StenoeraDher ^ 


22 






Superintendent, Boys' Charity School i 

Superintendent, Insane Asylum i 

Superintendent, Insane Asylum, as- 
sistant^ 








71.43 
100.00 

100.00 

100.00 
37.31 

100.00 
60.00 
75.00 
41.27 
33.33 

100.00 
50.00 

100.00 


1 








1 








1 


Siirvevor i . . 








1 


TeleCTanher i 


3 


1 




12 














3 










1 


TvDewriter * 


1 


7 




18 


Doi2 




"WTfttchnian .... ... . 










Veterinarv Insoector i 


1 


3 






Visltincr nhvsician 


2 












Total 


1,441 


60 


130 


6 


1,255 


710 


645 


66.67 


258 







I Written examination. 2 Noncompetitive examination for promotion. 

Table A-l.— Examinations held for the United States civil service. ' 

FOR ORIGINAL APPOINTMENT IN PORTO RICO. 



Examination. 



Educational: 

First-grade English, customs service. 
Post office, clerk-carrier, Spanish — 
Post office, clerk-carrier, English . . . . 

Subclerical, English 

Subclerical, Spanish 

Total 



Number 
exam- 
ined. 



161 



Passed. 



102 



Failed. 



Per cent 



37.46 
93.02 
89.28 
33.33 
66.67 



67.56 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOB OF PORTO RICO. 



65 



Table A-1. — Examinations held for the United States civil service — Continued. 
FOR ORIGINAL APPOINTMENT TO POSITIONS IN THE UNITED STATES.! 



Admission to United States Naval 

Academy 

Clerk, census 

Clerk, departmental ; 

File clerks 

Clerk, railway mail 

Immigration inspector 

Proof reader 



Number 
of com- 
petitors. 



Scientific assistant (entomology) 

Scientific assistant (horticulturist) 

Special agent to investigate South Ameri- 
can markets for dyestufEs and chemicals. 
Stenographer and typewriter 



Total.. 



Ntunber 
of com- 
petitors. 



1 
13 



1 The results of these examinations are not communicated to this commission. 

Total examined: 

For original appointment in Porto Rico 151 

For original appointment to positions in the United States 62 

In all 213 



Table B. — Changes in the Porto Rican civil service during the fiscal year ending June 

SO, 1920. 

[C.= Classified; U.= Unclassified.] 



Character of changes. 


Governor. 


Police. 


Secretary. 


Justice. 


Finance. 


Auditor. 


Interior. 


U. 


c. 


U. 


C, 


U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


Probational and original 
appointments 


1 




117 

1 


1 




26 
1 
5 

51 
1 

13 

14 
4 


65 
..... 

18 

1 

45 

47 
35 


40 
15 
14 
31 
5 
32 

58 
43 


2 
""2 


43 
5 

20 

104 

1 

45 

105 
41 


1 


2 
1 

12 
19 


92 
11 


73 




15 


Transfers 










7 


Promotions 






27 


1 




120 


Reductions 








Separations 






127 

207 
207 








13 


91 
67 


68 


Temporary employment: 
Appointments 










218 


Separations 










82 

















Total 


1 




686 


2 




115 


212 


238 


4 


364 


1 


55 


307 


583 







Character of changes. 


Educa- 
tion. 


Agricul- 

cure and 

labor. 


Health. 


Civil 
Service. 


Library. 


Institute 
of Tropical 
Medicine. 


Total. 




U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


U. 


C. 


U. 


c. 


U. 


C. 


Both. 


Probational and orig- 
inal appointments. . 
Reinstatements 


492 
560 


6 




13 
2 
10 

7 


206 
"32' 


29 

21 

1 

8 

1 

183 

92 

8 





2 






5 




981 
572 

2 
274 

7 
799 

322 

280 


235 
60 
75 

353 
8 

368 

528 
192 


1 216 






632 


Transfers 


2 
9 






3 

1 


•• 


1 
2 


1 




77 


Promotions 


189 

6 

360 


627 


Reductions 






15 


Separations 


7 


5 

28 
9 


171 





1 

3 
2 




1 

2 
2 


3 

1 




1,167 
850 


Temporary employ- 
ment: 
Appointments 


1 





Separations. . . 




472 














Total 


1,607 


25 1 


74 


409 


343 




12 




8 


10 


Ia.?.^7 


1,819 


5,056 






■ 







66 



EEPOBT OF THE GOVERNOB OF POETO RICO. 



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EEPOKT OF THE GOVEENOK OF POETO EIOO. 



75 



Table E. — Table showing number of positions and total salaries of native and non- 
native officers and employees. 





Natives. 


Nannatives. 


Branch of the service. 


Total 
salaries. 


Number 

em- 
ployed. 


Average 
salary. 


Total 
salaries. 


Number 

em- 
ployed. 


Average 
salary. 


Senate 


$29,820.00 
43,460.00 
4,337.50 

657,418.80 
94,774.95 

581,62^85 

317,863.00. 
77,205.00 

532,349.15 
63,759.35 
2,610,868.75 
64,148.00 
10,790.00 

130,544.00 
5,256.00 

308,436.40 
10,389.75 
23,378.00 
13,320.50 


29 

49 

3 

726 

57 

448 

228 

44 

530 

51 

3,176 

51 

9 

82 

6 

393 

8 

13 

8 


$1,028.28 
1,114.36 
1,445.67 

906.78 
1,662.71 
1,298.27 
1,394.14 
1,754.66 
1,004.43 
1,210.96 

822.06 
1,257.80 
1,198.89 
1,592.00 

876.00 

784.83 
1,298.72 
1,775.23 
1,665.06 








House of representatives 








Governor 


$15,175.00 

3,960.00 

6,279.00 

32,732.00 

13,068.00 

23,317.50 

9,824.50 

7,710.00 

166,909.25 

98,730.00 


3 
1 
3 
9 
7 
8 
4 
2 
126 
48 


$5,058.33 
3,960.00 
2,093.00 
3,636.89 
1,866.86 
2,914.69 
2 466.13 
3,855.00 
1,404.04 
2,056.88 


PoUce 


Executive secretary 


Justice 


Finance department 


Auditor 


Interior department 


Interior— irrigation service 

Education 


University 


Carnegie Library 


Agriculture and labor 


21,788.50 
3,105.00 
1,080.00 
5,907.00 


8* 

1 
1 
2 


2,723.56 
3,105.00 
1,080.00 
2,953.60 


Civil service commission 

Health department 


San Juan Harbor Board 

Institute of Tropical Medicine. 


Public service commission 








Total 


5,579,748.00 


5,911 


943.96 


409,585.75 


223 


1,836.71 





Appendix II. 

BBPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETAEY OF PORTO RICO. 

Office op the Executive Secretary, 

San Juan, P. J?., August 9, 1920, 
Sir: I have the honor to submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1920. 

LEGISLATION. 

The Legislature of Porto Rico was still holding at the beginning of the fiscal year its 
second regular session, which had begun on February 10, 1919, and lasted until July 6, 
1919, a period of about five months of continuous legislative work. It was the longest 
session ever held by the legislature in Porto Rico and the one in which the largest 
tiumber of laws, many of them of great importance, were enacted, with the exception 
of the session held in the year 1902. Eighty-five acts and thirty-six joint resolutions 
were approved by the governor. 

Acting Gov. Benedicto, who had assumed the duties of chief executive officer of 
the island on January 11, 1920, upon his designation by the President of the United 
States, and on account of Gov. Yager's disability, due to a sudden and serious illness, 
issued on April 20, 1920, a proclamation calling the Legislature of Porto Rico in 
special session to consider certain important matters of public interest requiring legis- 
lative action, to wit: 1. To increase the existing appropriations for the maintenance 
of thq iiyjular police force, which became insufficient for the purpose, due to the neces- 
sity of appointing 200 additional pohcemen to maintain puolic order during the a^- 
cultural laborers'strike, themostimportant and protracted labor trouble ever happenmg 
in this island. 2. To make certain necessary amendments to the laws of taxation, munic- 
ipal government, elections, and compensation of workmen in cases of accident, so as 
to remedy some difficulties developed in their execution. 3. To provide some accom- 
modation for the poor people of San Juan who were living on the lowlands adjoining 
the seashore, as the work of dredging the harbor was to begin in a short time and said 
lands were the first to be filled in. 4. To authorize the incorporation of cooperative 
societies of production and consumption and to increase the salaries of all officers and 
employees of the insular government, both measures being indispensable on account 
of tne high prevailing prices of the articles of prime necessity. 

The legislature promptly convened at 10 o'clock a. m. April 26, 1920, and adjourned 
on May 6, 1920, after the passage during the 10 legislative days of the special session of 
19 acts and 6 joint resolutions, all of which were duly approved by the governor and 
are now filed in this office. 

Of the legislation so enacted only the two following acts are connected with the 
duties of the executive secretary of Porto Rico: (1) An act for the incorporation and 
regulation of cooperative associations of production and consumption, and (2) an act 
to amend sections 11, 13, 15, 21, 22, 37, 40, 42, 46, 70, 71, and 72 of an act entitled 
"An act to establish the law of registrations and elections," approved June 25, 1919, 
and to add sections 13a, 13b, 13c, 21a, 22a, 22b, 23a, 23b, 71a, and 97a to the aforesaid 
act, and for other purposes." 

I will make some explanations about these two laws in the subdivisions of this report 
relative to "corporations" and "elections." 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The printinff of the volume of the session laws of 1919, containing 900 pages, was 
promptly finished at the beginning of the fiscal year and properly distributed, and 
at the end of said year the volume of laws corresponding to the special session of 1920 
was in process of publication. Twenty-nine adininistrative bulletins issued for the 
promulgation of governor's proclamations and executive orders, were c^o prepared, 
printed, and distributed by this office. 

I have to recommend that necessary provision of funds be made by the legislature 
at its next regular session for the preparation, printing, and distribution of two publi- 

76 



BEPORT OF THE EXECUTIYB SECRETARY. 77 

cations the necessity of which is greatly felt. One is a new compilation of the Codes 
and Laws of Porto Rico up to the end of the regular legislative session of 1921. The 
last compilation was published in the year 1911, and 10 years is a sufficient period of 
time to warrant the revision and compilation of our legislation, in order that all the 
laws in force may be found in only one volume and so as to avoid the trouble of exam- 
ining all the volumes of the session laws published since the year 1912 every time one 
needs to know if some particular provision of law has or has not been amended during 
the last 10 years, 

The other publication I am referring to is a new Register of Porto Rico. The last edition 
of this book was also published in the year 1911 and became exhausted a long time ago. 
As a business proposition it will pay with excess its cost, because although its distri- 
bution is to be free of charge as usual, the use of the book for school purposes and as 
a medium of advertisement for the island and its business opportunities and resources 
abroad is extremely valuable. It is a pity that we have to answer always in the negative 
the large number of requests we are frequently receiving from business men and cor» 
porations for copies of the said Register. 

Another recommendation I desire to make is that a special revolving fund be 
appropriated by the legislature for the publication in loose-leaf form of all those laws 
and administrative bulletins that may be of a general character and to republish 
them when their last editions may have become exhausted, and that this office be 
authorized to sell them to private persons at cost price, so as to cover at least in part 
the expenses of publication. 

The sale of law books and of the 1911 compilation during the year 1919-20 amounted 
to $1,481.01. 

PASSPORTS AND. IDENTITY CARDS. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, 1,239 passports were issued for the 
following countries: 

Cuba 594 

Santo Domingo 237 

Vene mela 139 

Spain 105 

France 45 

Colombia 24 

England 19 

Panama 15 

Bra il 13 

Haiti 12 

Mexico 4 

Ecuaior 3 Total 1,2 

Although there appears a decrease in the number of passports issued as compared 
with the 1,421 granted in the fiscal year 1918-19, no such decrease exists, if it is taken 
into consideration the fact that the undersigned has also issued 371 identification 
cards for Santo Domingo, which means on the contrary that the work in this office 
during the fiscal year in connection with the service of furnishing to citizens of the 
United States the necessary documents to go abroad has again increased to what it 
was during the fiscal year 1917-18, in which 1,625 passports were issued, the largest 
number in any fiscal year since the Governor of Porto Rico was given authority for 
the issuance of passports in 1902. 

As stated in my last annual report, the system of identification cards for travel 
between Porto Rico and Santo Domingo was principally adopted as an emergency 
measure, to facilitate the emigration of our surplus labor population to the neighbor- 
ing island, where the Porto Rican laborers were greatly needed for the agricultural 
development of that country. Our unskilled laborers had great difficulties to comply 
with all the formalities and requirements of an application for passport. Said system 
was inaugurated on February 3, 1919, by the commissioner of immigration of Porto 
Rico under instructions from the State Department and was at first extended to all 
near-by islands. 

In September of the same year it was to be discontinued, but both the Federal and 
the Insular Governments being thoroughly convinced of the necessity and advantages 
of maintaining it, especially between Porto Rico and Santo Domingo, reached an 
agreement by which certain Porto Rican officials were to take charge of this service, 
without any expense to the United States, simply with a desire to cooperate in helping 
the neighbor country and in contributing to relieve our crowded condition of labor. 
Accordingly, upon the recommendation of the Governor, the following permit agents 
ojf the State Department for the issuance of identification cards were appointed: Mr. 
Ram6n Brandos, for the port of Ponce; Mr. Ram6n A. Manich, for the i)ort of Maya- 
guez; and the undersigned for the port of San Juan. For the sake of uniformity, the 
permit agents at Ponce and Mayaguez must conduct their correspondence with the 
State Department through the permit agent at San Juan. 

14748—20 6 • 



Italy 2 

Canada 2 

St. Kitts, British West Indies 2 

Jamaica 2 

Dominica, British West Indies 2 

Argentine Republic 2 

Chile 1 

G uadeloupe , French West Indies 1 

Uruguay 1 

Barbados, British West Indies 1 



78 REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Furthermore, in the absence of an insular official at the port of Guanica, it was 
arranged to maintain there the former permit agent under the United States immigra- 
tion commissioner, during the cane harvesting season. 

After receiving proper instructions from Washington, the new permit agents entered 
upon their new duties; that is, the issuance of identity cards only to American citizens 
and for travel between Santo Domingo and Porto Rico; travelers to Cuba, Haiti, and 
the French and British West Indies being required to secure passports in the regular 
way before leaving the island. The permit agents at Ponce and Mayaguez were given 
full instructions by the undersigned as to the manner of fulfilling their duties and 
especially as to the manner of determining the true citizenship of the applicants. 

The passports issued for Cuba, Venezuela, and Colombia have increased in com- 
parison witn those granted in 1918-19, said increase being due with respect to the 
former country to the following facts: (1) That many agricultural laborers have gone 
to Cuba on account of the high wages paid there, and (2) that the crowded condition 
of the passenger traffic in the regular lines of steamers plying between Porto Rico 
nd New York made necessary for many persons to go to Cuba in foreign boats in 
tt ansit to the mainland. In regard to Venezuela and Colombia, more passports have 
been issued on account of certain agricultural and industrial enterprises which are 
now being developed in said two countries with Porto Rican capital and which has 
made it necessary to send thereto a number of mechanics, agricultiual experts, and 
other skilled laborers. 

The number of passports granted during the last fiscal year may be also subdivided 
as follows: 1,053 to persons who were collectively naturalized as citizens of the United 
States under the provisions of the so-called Jones Act, the new organic act of Porto Rico; 
138 to native-bom citizens; 36 to persons who had become naturalized after complying 
with the procedure estabhshed in the naturalization law; 6 to persons who claimed 
citizenship through the naturalization of their fathers or husbands; 3 to citizens of 
Porto Rico; and 3 to inhabitants of the Virgin Islands, subject to the protection of 
the United States. 

The pecuHar conditions existing in Porto Rico in regard to the citizenship of its 
inhabitants, brought about by the outcome of the Spanish- American war and as a 
result of the stipulations of the treaty of peace between the United States and Spain, 
have made very difficult the work of determining the citizenship of each and every 
applicant for a passport. 

As to the manner in which the American citizenship may have been secured, the 
citizens of the United States in Porto Rico may be divided into three classes : 

1. Citizens naturalized by virtue of the collective naturalization provided for in the 
present organic act of Porto Rico (Jones Act). This class covers not only the natives 
of Porto Rico who were Spanish subjects at the time of the ratification of the treaty 
of Paris, and were then residing in this island, as well as those who were temporarily 
absent and have since returned and resumed here their permanent residence, but also 
those Spanish subjects bom in the Spanish Peninsula who were residing at the same 
time and have continued to reside in Porto Rico, and did not make any declaration 
to preserve their allegiance to the Crown of Spain within the year granted tot that 
effect by Article IX of the treaty. This class also covers the children of the preceding 
persons born subsequent to the passage of Porto Rico under the sovereignty of the 
United States, and the children born in Porto Rico, either before or after the ratifica- 
tion of the treaty, of Spanish subjects born in the Spanish Peninsula and retaining 
their former allegiance to the Spanish Nation; in other words, all persons born in Porto 
Rico of Porto Rican or Spanish parents, and all resident persons bom in the Spanish 
Peninsula who did not use the privilege of retaining their former nationality. 

2. Citizens naturalized through the regular process of the naturalization laws. 
This class covers not only persons born in Spain who remained as Spaniards after the 
treaty and persons born in other foreign countries, but also persons born in Porto Rico- 
of alien parents (not Spanish) who have been declared citizens by a Federal court, 
through the process provided for in the naturalization laws, or through the special 
procedure prescribed in our organic act. 

3. Native-born citizens. 

In addition to these classes of applicants, we also have the citizens of Porto Rieo; 
that is, the small number of persons who declared their intention not to become 
citizens of the United States, and therefore retained their former pohtical status after 
the Jones Act became effective, and the natives of the Virgin Islands who are tempo- 
rarily residing here. These persons are also entitled to passports as citizens of PortO" 
Rico or inhabitants of the Virgin Islands, subject to the protection of the United States. 

In addition to the preceding work, 35 passports issued by the State Department 
were amended or extended, and 16 passports issued by American legations were also, 
amended. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 79 

Two passports and one identification card were denied during the year. The former, 
because the applicants were not citizens of the United States but Dominican citizens. 
The latter, under advice from the United States mihtary government at Santo Do- 
mingo to the effect that the applicant was undesirable and would not be allowed to 
land there. Only three persons withdrew their applications due to their inability to 
comply with the rules and regulations on the matter. 

On August 6, 1919, the Department of State decided the inquiries made by this 
office as to the citizenship of the minor children of Mr. Pedro Brull, a Spanish subject, 
and of Mr. Octavio Mella, a Dominican citizen, who had applied for passports as 
American citizens, all of them being natives of Porto Rico. These two cases were 
pending decision when my last annual report was closed, and the conclusion reached 
by this office was that neither Mr. Mella's children nor Mr. Brull's children were 
citizens of the United States; in the first case, because the United States Congress in 
the new organic act of Porto Rico had given complete recognition to the principle of 
international law that minors follow the nationality of their parents, and had declared 
that any person born in Porto Rico of an alien parent could not become an American 
citizen until reaching his or her majority or within one year thereafter; in the second 
case, because, although the State Department had held that the privilege of preserv- 
ing their former allegiance to the Crown of Spain had only been granted by the treaty 
of Paris to the Spanish subjects born in the Spanish Peninsula and not to their chil- 
dren born in Porto Rico, who were to be considered as citizens of the United States, 
still, in the judgment of the undersigned, the provisions of the treaty could only be 
applicable to those children of Spanish subject already born at the time of its ratifi- 
cation and not to the children born in Porto Rico subsequent thereto, who should 
be placed on the same level as the children of all other alien parents mentioned in the 
organic act. 

The resolution in the Mella case was in strict accord with the opinion of this office; 
but, contrary to my expectations, the State Department ruled that Mr. BrulFs children 
were citizens of the United States on the ground that the provision of section 7 of the 
act of Congress of April 12, 1900 (the Foraker Act), reading "and their children born 
subsequent thereto" covers not only the children of Spanish subjects who become 
Porto Rican citizens, but also the children of Spanish subjects who retained their 
Spanish nationality, since no right of election was reserved to the Porto Rican children 
of Spanish subjects even in the case they were born subsequent to April 11, 1899, the 
date of ratification of the treaty of Paris. 

During the fiscal year and due to the relaxation of the strict war regulations affecting 
travel, instructions were first received from the State Department for the issuance of 
passports for use in Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Holland, Belgium, Great Britain, 
France, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, and Portugal, as well as in Africa, Asia, and 
America, to persons who might have a legitimate and reasonable object for their trips, 
and even for pleasure or recreation to Latin America, Japan, and China, thus discon- 
tinuing the previous policy of issuing passports only when it was proven that the 
journey was urgently necessary. Egypt was excepted in Africa, Siberia and the 
Straits Settlements in Asia, and Mexico in America. 

Later on, new instructions were issued, and as a result thereof it was no longer 
necessary to submit applications for passports for Europe to the approval of the Depart- 
ment of State, and the Governor of Porto Rico was authorized to issue passports for 
purposes of travel, recreation, and pleasure to all countries except the following: 
Germany, Austria, Hungary, Albania, Arabia, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Finland, 
Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, Mexico, Persia, Russia, Poland, or Turkey, 
but it was clearly established that the governor's authority should only be appUed 
to citizens of the United States, residents in Porto Rico, and not to transient citizens 
who should secure their passports before leaving continental United States, unusual 
and meritorious cases excepted. 

This new ruling as to transient citizens was going to be a source of trouble and 
difficulty for persons who usually come from New York direct to Porto Rico for com- 
mercial purposes and on account of the lack of transportation facilities to go back 
direct to the mainland, have to make their return trips via Cuba, and of course need 
passports for this country in transit to the United States. In order to give them any 
kind of facilities to go home, as well as to avoid anything that may hamper the ever- 

f rowing business relations between Porto Rico and the United ^ates, it has been 
ecided to grant them passports for Cuba while the present lack of available direct 
transportation means is not remedied. 

CORPORATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS. 

Seventy co^rporations were legally organized in Porto Rico in the year 1919-20 with 
a total authorized capital stock of $12,756,000 and a total paid-in capital to begin 
their business of $1,152,110. This is the largest number so organized in any one 



80 



BEPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



fiscal year, since 1902 in which a new corporation law was approved, modeled upon 
the Ajiglo-Saxon incorporation system. 

This result may be attributed to the same causes stated in my last annual report. 
A greater abundance of money available for new enterprises, due to the very excep- 
tionally high prices (the greatest ever recorded) at which sugar, the principal product 
of the island, has been sold during the first half of the year 1920; and the constantly 
increasing tendency to adopt the corporate form for every kind of business, as it may 
be clearly seen in the following statement from the large diversity of purposes for 
which the above-mentioned 70 corporations were organized: 



Mercantile in general 11 

Conducting theaters and motion- picture places. 7 

Preparing and selling drugs and chemicals 7 

Dealing in automobiles and accessories 4 

Gro vving and manufacturing sugar 3 

Cultivating fruits 2 

Banking ^ 2 

Insurance 2 

Publishing and printing 2 

Real estate development 2 

Manufacturing clay products 1 

Manufacturing salt 1 

Producing motion pictures 1 

Cooperati\ e building, saving, and loaning 1 

Furnishing electric light and power 1 

Preparing food products 

Automobile transportation 

Real estate brokerage 

Dealing in petroleum 

Operating electric street railways 

Manufacturing bay rum 



Dealing in lumber 

Holding fairs 

Raising and selling bees and their products. 

Conducting a bakery 

Dealing in tobacco. . 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

Quarrying marble 1 

Conducting hospitals 1 

Manufacturing embroidered novelties and dress 

goods I 

Operating gardens and plant nurseries i 

Dealing in coffee ^ 

Manufacturing cotton and cotton goods j^ 

Electroplating ^ 

Manufacturing fruit juices i 

Manufacturing soaps < 

Conducting a jewelry business ^ 

Manufacturing fertilizers j 

Manufacturing boxes and furniture 

Total 70 



A good number of new industries have started in that way, taking advantage of the 
relatively cheap labor that may be obtained in Porto Rico, and it is to be expected 
that if those industrial enterprises are successful, new ones will be established and a 
new field will be opened for the further economic development of this island. Of 
these 70 corporations, 45 have their principal place of business at San Juan, the capital 
of the island; 5 at Ponce; 5 at Mayaguez; 2 each at Bayamon, Guayama, and Caguas; 
and 1 each at Humacao, Lares, Adjuntas, Yauco, San Sebastian, Aguadilla, Cayey, 
Rincon, and Aguas Buenas. 

Fourteen new foreign corporations were authorized to do business in Porto Rico 
during the fiscal year, with a total authorized capital stock of $39,296,200 and a capital 
paid in of $27,928,360. Five of these corporations were for insurance, 5 for dealing 
m tobacco, and 1 each for dealing in sugar, raising fruits, manufacturing handkerchiefs, 
and making hand embroidery. All of them were American corporations organized in 
the States of New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Georgia, Delaware, Louisiana, 
and Rhode Island, with the exception of two of the insurance corporations which 
were British. 

The number of domestic corporations dissolved during the year was 20, and the 
number of foreign corporations which ceased to do business in Porto Rico was 17. 

Thirty-eight associations were also organized under the provisions of the non- 
pecuniary association act, for mutual protection, and for fraternal, charitable, social, 
religious, artistic, and literary purposes. Fifteen of them were to promote the devel- 
opment of a^culture, following a movement initiated and encouraged by the depart- 
ment of agriculture and labor of the insular government to stimulate the formation 
of agricultural leagues throughout the island for the establishment of close bonds of 
union and cooperation among the cultivators of the soil, so that they may be in a 
better condition to defend their interests and to secure for their work the great advan- 
tages offered by cooperation, either in the buying of agricultural implements, fer- 
tilizers, and so forth, or in the marketing of their products. 

Seven domestic associations of this kind were dissolved during the year. 

As stated elsewhere in this re;port, Acting Gov. Benedicto recommended to the 
legislature the passage at the special session of an act for the formation of cooperative 
societies of production and consumption. 

Taking as a basis a project which had been submitted to the consideration of the 
acting governor, and after studying a small number of the acts in force in the States for 
the same purpose, the undersigned drafted a bill for the incorporation and regulation 
of such societies, which bill was introduced into and promptly passed by the legisla- 
ture with very slight amendments, having received without delay the acting governor's 
approval. 

Due to the high cost of living its enactment was very necessary, as there was no law 
in force authorizing the incorporation of this kind of cooperative societies, and a coop- 
erative association of consumers, if properly administered, is considered as a good and 
effective method to reduce the cost of living to reasonable terms. At the same time, 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 81 

it was deemed advisable to include also in the new act the necessary authorization for 
the formation of cooperative societies of producers, so as to O'ffer to the agricultural 
leagues formed or in process of formation the legal means to secure their aims in the 
same way as the cooperative idea is bringing very valuable help to farmers in some 
States of the Union. 

This new statutory law authorizes the organization by any number of persons, not 
less than seven, of any cooperative association, society, union, company, or exchange, 
for the purpose of engaging in commerce, agriculture, dairying, mining, manufactures, 
or mechanic industries on the cooperative plan, establishes the necessary regulations 
for the election of directors, the holding of meetings, and the management of the cor- 
porate business; limits the number of shares to be held by each stockholder and pro- 
vides for only one vote for each of th«m, irrespective of the number of shares he may 
own, so as to avoid the possible control of these societies by rich or selfish persons who 
may not be friendly to the cooperative idea and try to carry it to failure; provides for 
the pajrment of dividends and the creation of a reserve fund out of the net profits of 
the society; requires official reports and provides for proper governmental investiga- 
tions as a 'guaranty to stockholders; and fix.es the penalties to be imposed upon any 
corporate director or official who fails to file a report or who makes a false statement 
therein. 

The law perhaps is not a perfect one, but I consider it as a good start, and the defi- 
ciencies to be observed in its execution may be, of course, corrected by subsequent 
legislation. * 

To complete the full development of the cooperative idea I would recommend that 
a new law be passed permitting the organization of cooperative credit associations so 
as to facilitate to small cultivators and producers the means of raising the money neces- 
sary for their business. 

More detailed information about corporations is to be found in the several statements 
hereto attached. 

TRADE-MARKS. 

The registration of domestic trade-marks has considerably increased in the last two 
fiscal years, keeping pace with the tremendous volume of business transacted in the 
island during the same period of time. It suffices to say that while up to 1917-18 an 
average of 60 were annually registered, in 1918-19 the number of registrations reached 
95, and in the last fiscal j^ear grew up to 188, representing an increase of 98 per cent 
as compared with the previous fiscal year and 268 per cent over the fiscal year 1917-18. 

The trade-marks so registered were applicable to the sale of the following articles: 

Kitchen utensils 2 

Wire 2 

Soap u 2 

Bicycles 2 

Horse and mule shoes 2 

Playing cards 2 

Cement and construction materials 2 

Metals and metal castings and forgings 

Alcoholic beverages 

Bee honey 

Newspapers 

Rugs 

Polishing preparations 

Piece goods 

Glassware 

Jewelry 

Furniture 

Total 188 

Also 49 United States trade-marks (an increase of more than 61 per cent over the 
previous fiscal year) and 57 United States letters patent were registered in this office. 

Two applications for registrations were denied, one of them because it had never 
been used in commerce in Porto Rico, and our laws only authorize the reo^istration of 
trade-marks which have been used before the application for registration is filed, and 
the other because it was so similar to a trade-mark already registered and in use by the 
West India Oil Co., of New Jersey, for the sale of the same kind of articles as to be 
likely to cause confusion in the mind of the purchasers. 

OLD SPANISH ARCHIVES. 

The act to create the Historial Archive of Porto Rico, approved on June 20, 1919, 
and to which I referred in my last annual report, became effective 90 days after its 
approval— that is, on the 18th day of September of- the same year— and on the 5th day 



Chemicals, medicines, and pharmaceutical prep- 
arations 27 

Motor vehicles and parts thereof 24 

Foods and ingredients of foods 15 

Clothing 14 

Toilet preparations 12 

Machines and machinery 12 

Confectionery 12 

Electrical apparatus, machines, and supplies . . 12 

Musical instruments and supplies 5 

Paints and painters' materials 5 

Thread and yarn 5 

Leather and leather products 5 

Dental, medical, and surgical appliances 4 

Petroleum and products thereoi 3 

Oils and greases 3 

Nonalcoholic beverages 2 

Cigars and cigarettes 2 

Motion pictures 2 



82 REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO, 

of November the governor did appoint the director of the new institution, who imme- 
diately assumed the duties of his office to be carried out under the supervision and 
direction of the governor. 

Consequently all books, documents, and other papers pertaining to the times of the 
Spanish regime of this island, which had been under the custody of this office until 
such time as the legislature might determine the final and permanent disposition 
thereof, were legally placed in the custody of the director of the Historial Archive, 
and the undersigned therefore relieved of any further duty in reference to the keeping, 
classification, and preservation of these old records. 

ELECTIONS. 

As hereinbefore stated, at the last special session of the legislature an act amendatory 
of the registrations and elections law was passed and approved by the acting governor. 
Certain amendments related to the nomination of candidates and the juioption of 
devices to distinguish each political party on the ballot— that is, to such a part of the 
election proceedings as it is put by law under the jurisdiction of this office. 

The legislature in said amendments provided that in nominating candidates by 
petition the number of the registration pertaining to each subscriber be set fortn 
thereon; increased from 500 to 1,000 the number of signatures in the 5 municipal 
petitions, of 200 signatures each, necessary to nominate candidates for members of 
the senate in senatorial districts; also increased •from 2,000 to 4,000 the number of 
signatures in the 20 municipal petitions, of 200 signatures each, necessary to nominate 
candidates for Commissioner to Washington, senators, and representatives at large, and 
public-service commissioners; required a petition containing at least 200 signatures of 
each of the municipalities comprised in a representative district to nominate candi- 
dates for members of the house of representatives in such districts, when only a peti- 
tion of 200 signatures of any one municipality within the district was heretofore 
sufficient; prohibited that a person may be a candidate for the same office on two differ- 
ent tickets; and at the suggestion of the undersigned made some changes in the pro- 
visions of law regulating the adoption of devices by the political parties, so as to 
clarify them by the establishment of a precise rule whereby the principal political 
parties might be guaranteed against any possible usurpation by new organizations of 
their priority rights to the exclusive use of their names and devices, or any part thereof. 

Up to June 30, 1920, 12 petitions for the nominations of candidates for the next 
elections to be held on November 2, 1920, had been presented to this office for fiUng. 
One was made by a local party of the municipahty of Utuado under the name of 
"Cuetistas Utuadefios," and only candidates for the municipal assembly were nomi- 
nated therein. The other 11 were submitted by the Sociahst Party, a political party 
principally formed by those Porto Rican laborers who are affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor and who are preaching and making propaganda in favor of the 
most radical social theories, some of its adherents going so far as to make pubhc utter- 
ances in support of a soviet form of government and of the principles advocated by 
some of the Kussian anarchist writers. The organization of this party is now being 
made through the whole island, and the members thereof are trying to nominate by 
petition candidates for every insular or municipal elective position, from Resident 
Commissioner to Washington down to members of the municipal assemblies. Of the 
12 petitions so received, 9 were still pending examination at the end of the fiscal year. 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 

The following additional work was also made in the fiscal year: 

Sixteen new notaries public were authorized and six ceased to practice their pro- 
fession in Porto Rico. On June 30, 1920, there were 262 notaries public registered in 
this office. Their names, residences, and dates of registration may be found in state- 
ment No. 13 attached hereto. 

Two commissioners of deeds for Porto Rico in the United States were appointed, one 
for the State of New Hampshire and the other reappointed for the State of New York. 
A list of all such commissioners whose terms of office have not expired is also found 
at the end of this report. 

One hundred and twenty -three hunting licenses were issued, the highest number 
granted in one year since the new hunting law of 1916 became effective. 

Fifty-four ordinances adopted by the public-service commission, granting new fran- 
chises or making amendments to or repealing those already in force, were thoroughly 
examined and approved by the governor. Three of these ordinances were returned to 
the said commission before its approval by the governor for amendment, so as to make 
clearer the meaning of certain clauses thereof and to include some provisions recom- 
mended by the franchise committee and inadvertently omitted in one of said 
ordinances. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 83 

Six hundred and seventy-eight commissions for municipal, judicial, and executive 
insular officers were prepared and forwarded, 341 of which were made in cases of 
recess appointments. 

Four hundred and fifty petitions for clemency were received and acted upon in the 
following way: Granted, 118; denied, 189; not considered, 67; and pending at the 
<?lose of business on June 30, 1920, 76. 

Eight new consular officers were registered. Among them there were two posi- 
tions newly created, those of consul of the Ret)ublic of Panama at Aguadilla and 
consul ad honorem of the Republic of Honduras at San Juan. For A long time the 
latter country has not had any consular representative in Porto Rico. A list of all 
consular officers, with their ranks and residences, is attached hereto. 

Twenty-two municipal ordinances for the sale, lease, or any other disposition of 
municipal real property were examined, of which 17 were approved by the governor, 
1 was disapproved, and no action was necessary on the remaining 4. The approval 
of the governor on ordinances of this kind will be no longer necessary, in view of 
the provisions of the new municipal law which has granted a larger measure of self- 
government to local political divisions. 

Thirty-eight ordinances approved by the executive council authorizing loans to 
be made by municipalities and school boards were also examined, and 30 of them were 
approved by the governor and no action taken on the remaining 8. 

Seven hundred and thirty-three dispatches by cable were forwarded and 626 were 
received by this office, most of which had to be coded or decoded for transmission to 
parties concerned. 

SUPPLY COMMITTEE. 

The supply committee held 50 meetings during the last fiscal year in which 377 
resolutions were adopted and 399 contracts awarded, aside of a considerable number 
of direct purchases authorized. 

The situation of the market and the difficulties of transportation have been more 
a,bnormal than ever, even worse than during the war period. Prices have been 
very high, and on account of their constant fluctuations, most of the bidders have 
been making their bids subject to change without notice, and consequently a number 
of awards were not accepted, and sometimes two or more calls for bids had to be made, 
thus considerably delaying the purchase and delivery of the articles needed for the 
Government services and work. The prices on building materials have been con- 
tinuously advancing since January 1, 1919, and very rapidly since Jime 1, 1919. 
Cement, especially, has been very scarce, and the prices paid for this article were 
three or four times higher than the current prices before the war. 

If it is added to the uncertainty of the market the difficulty in the transportation 
facilities due to the railroad embargo and labor unrest in the United States as well 
&B to the longshoremen's strike both in the United States and in Porto Rico, it would 
be easy to understand the troubles found by this committee in performing its duties 
of securing the necessary supplies for the different departments and offices of the 
insular government. 

As in the last fiscal year, it was necessary to make three calls for bids to secure 
a, supply of fresh milk for the penal and charitable institutions, during the first half 
of the year 1920, and in the district jail at Guayama condensed milk had to be used 
as it was impossible to obtain fresh milk at any price, due to the scarcity of such 
commodity. 

Just at the end of the fiscal year when the committee was going to award the con- 
tracts for the second half of the year 1920 for provisions to be delivered to the Gov- 
ernment institutions at San Juan and Santurce information was received to ^e 
effect that the prices of some food products had begun to decline and showed a down- 
ward tendency, which information was ratified by cable by the purchasing agent 
at New York, and, therefore, it was considered advisable not to make the award 
of such articles for the whole but for a shorter period, so as to secure better prices 
later on for the balance of the quantities required. So the award for rice was made 
for one month only, and the awards for codfish, beans, potatoes, ham, butter, lard, 
and bacon for three months. 

Purchase of some animals in the States for the insular experiment station and for 
the College of Agricultural and Medianic Arts were made during the year through 
the purchasing agent at New York. As some technical advice was necessary in 
order to inspect and select the animals offered by the bidders, the cooperation for 
such purpose of the Bureau of Animal Industry of the United States Department 
of Agriculture was fortunately secured, with very satisfactory results. 

In view of the fact that there were many bidders who for one reason or other did 
not file any temporary bond with their bids, and in certain cases they quoted the 
lowest prices, the committee taking also into consideration the market condition 8^ 
and in order to secure the large number of bids possible, adopted a resolution by 



84 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



which it reserved itself the right to consider or not bids submitted without tem- 
porary bonds, according to the financial standing of the bidders. 

Purchases of articles for the stock of the bureau of supplies have been made as 
far as possible through calls for bids and in larger amounts, so as to secure the best 
priceB obtainable. 

I think that the supply committee has carried out its work diuing the last fiscal 
year iinder the most trying and difficult circumstances, but nevertheless its inter- 
vention in the, purchase of Government supplies has been productive of the best 
resiilts, beiug not only profitable to the public service but also a guaranty of impar- 
tiality and fair deal to manufacturers, producers, and merchants who have shown 
a desire to transact business with the people of Porto Rico. 

BUREAU OP SUPPLIES, PRINTING, AND TRANSPORTATION. 

The volume of business handled during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919, was 
considered as abnormal, due to the campaign against the influenza epidemic and the 
campaign against prostitution, as well as the repairing of public buildings damaged 
by the eartiiquake. However, during the fiscal year 1919-20 the total amount of 
business was of $2,377,770.47, a reduction of only 115,072.21, or 0.63 perc ent. Dur- 
ing the same year $45,341.77 was spent for salaries and contingent expenses, of which 
amount $736.81 was for delivery service. The operating cost has been, therefore^ 
$44,604.96, or 1.87 per cent. 

The total purchases made by the supply division for the year amounted to $1,177,- 
228.07, an increase over the preceding year of $36,289.60, or 3.18 per cent. Of this 
amount $751,459.53 constitutes purchases made from merchants in Porto Rico, which 
means a decrease of $110,663.86, or 12.84 per cent. The purchases made from mer- 
chants in the United States are figured at $369,877.64. This is an increase over the 
preceding year of $93,069.06, or 33.62 per cent. 

Diuing the fiscal year 1918-19 textbooks were purchased directly from Porto Rico 
and paid from the San Juan ofiice. This procedure was changed during the fiscal 
year 1919-20, and purchases of textbooks to the amount of $73,444.17 were made 
through the New York oflace and paid directly by the special disbursing officer at 
Washington, D. G. 

The increase of the purchases from the United States is explained by the change 
noted above in the purchase of textbooks and the fact that the supply committee 
awarded a contract for 150 ready-cut houses to a manufacturer in the United States. 
The cost of these houses plus freight was $40;333.41. Otherwise purchases made from 
the United States covered those supplies and machinery that could not be obtained 
in Porto Rico due to the abnormal conditions still ruling in commercial transactions. 

The total sales made during the year amounted to $1,181,239.63, a small decrease 
oyer last year of $7,125.05, or 0.06 per cent. Of this amount $85,779.11 is for merchan- 
dise and automobile supplies sold from the stock of the bureau. 

The supply division attends to the preparation of calls for bids which are to be 
made in accordance with the law for every purchase amounting to $300 or more. 
This limit fixed by law proves very small with the high prices ruling for every kind 
of material, and the number of calls for bids has been increasing every year. The 
increase in the work of this division is explained in the following statement: 



Year. 



191&-17 1917-18 1918-19 191^20 



Requisitions 

Purchase orders 
Contract orders. 
Froi)OsaIs 



7,631 

7,623 

1,188 

55 



8,478 

8,229 

1,945 

65 



9,276 

8,386 

2,297 

111 



10,064 

8,916 

2,26a 

177 



It is earnestly recommended that the Department of the Interior condense in a 
requisition all the materials required for each work to be done and that full specifi- 
cations be given on the requisitions from all departments in order to avoid unneces- 
sary correspondence and delays. 

The net output of the printing division amounted to $77,450.01, an increase over 
last fiscal year of $8,889.82, or 12.94 per cent. Work was undertaken on 3,064 jobs. 

Besides the work done for the insular government, the printing division attended 
to the printing of certain forms for the Virgin Islands ana the Customs Tariff of the 
Dominican Republic, as a courtesy to the Governments of these two countries. 

One of the improvements made in this division was the installation of a new wire- 
stitching machine with capacity of from two sheets to one-fourth inch thick. 

The printing division attended to the manufacture of scratch pads and stenographers' 
notebooks for the stock of the bureau, to be sold to the various departments. A 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 85- 

quantity of 4,713 scratch pads were made at a cost of $259.14. These pads would 
have cost the Government $529.40. By doing this, there has been a saving to the Gov- 
ernment of $270.26. Stenographers' notebooks were made with a similar saving. 
This practice will be continued hereafter. 

In accordance with section 10 of joint resolution No. 14 of the year 1916, all depart- 
ments are recjuired to transfer to the bureau any surplus property no longer required 
by them, this property to be transferred by the bureau to other departments where 
it mig:ht be used to advantage. A great number of desks, tables, chairs, typewriters, 
electric fans, etc., were transferred in this way during this fiscal year. To give an 
idea of the benefit derived by the Government with this measure, it must be men- 
tioned that 15 old desks transferred by the department of health to the bureau, which 
were not worth $10 in all, were properly repaired at the bureau at a cost of about $8 
and are now being used by the department of finance, insular telegraph, and insular 
police. The cost of one of these desks brand new is to-day $80. 

The automobiles of the bureau made 517 trips during the year, with a running of 
115,151 kilometers, or 29,396 kilometers less than the preceding year. The average 
cost per kilometer is 16.6 cents. This shows an increase of 0.6 cent per kilometer, 
due to the drop in the running of all cars. It was necessarjr to hire cars for 43 trips, 
at a cost of $3,290. Besides this, most of the departments hired cars direct when the- 
bureau could not furnish the service. 

Attention is called again to the necessity of increasing the number of cars at the 
service of this bureau, as the hiring ot private cars is a very expensive item. 

During the year two new cars were purchased to take the place of two old cars. There 
are at present six cars in actual service. One car will be added as soon as the amount 
of funds in reserve for purchases and renewals may cover the cost thereof. 

The only truck engaged in the delivery service handled during the year 1,006,633 
pounds of freight in San Juan, 91,305 pounds in Santurce, and 6,395 in Rio Piedras^ 
with a cost of $736.81 for supplies and labor during the year. 

BUREAU OP WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

As stated in my last annual report, due to the repeated efforts of the undersigned, 
the number of traveling inspectors of weights and measures was increased from six to- 
eight for the fiscal year 1919-20 and 1920-21, which enabled the bureau of weights 
and measures to reorganize somewhat its field work by the assignment of a resident 
inspector to each judicial district with the exception of San Juan, to which twa 
inspectors have been assigned, due to its greater importance as compared with any 
of the other districts. 

By virtue of this new organization a closer attention is secured to the needs of the 
service in the most important cities of the island which have been assigned to the 
inspectors as their residence stations, a much better vigilance is obtained over all 
the municipalities and the traveling expenses are decreased in view of the reduction 
of the zone placed under the care of each inspector. 

The persistent efforts of the bureau with the municipal authorities to convince them 
of the need of having an official appointed who should at least devote a portion of hiB 
time to weights and measures duties have been rewarded with splendid results. The 
bureau has been able to secure the appointment of a municipal inspector for each of 
the 76 municipalities of the island with the exception of 3 — Dorado, Jayuga, and 
Villalba. 

It is true that in most cases the salary assigned to the municipal inspectors is so- 
small that it is nearly impossible to find a suitable person to fill the position and when, 
fortunately, such a person is found and accepts it, usually he shortly afterwards resigns 
to accept a more lucrative position. The numerous changes that have taken place 
during the year have been due, at least in part, to the changes in the muncipal officials 
brought about by the enactment of the new municipal law which became effective 
during the fiscal year and which brought with it many changes in the munici}>al offi- 
cers of the island. In 38 municipalities new municipal weights and measures inspec- 
tors were appointed, and in some cases two and even three changes occurred during 
•the fiscal year. This, of course, has been a serious drawback, as the change of per- 
sonnel not only affects directly the efficiency of these employees in each municipality, 
but it furthermore increases the difficult work of the insular inspectors of training 
them in their functions. 

Notwithstanding all the difficulties met with during the year, the work of the bureau 
has not decreased as may be readily appreciated by the following r^um6: 

The insular inspectors visited 24,412 commercial or industrial establishments and 
made a detailed inspection in 5,476 of them. 

The total number of apparatus tested by them during the year is 189,183 as compared 
with 175,724 tested during the previous year. 



8^ REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OE PORTO RICO. 

The number of violations denounced by the insular inspectors which have been 
passed upon bv the courts reached 643 this year as against 523 for the Previous year 
The municiparinspectors filed and the courts passed upon 227 cases as against 202 last 

^^mnety-four thousand four hundred and seven packages were reweighedb^^^ 
insular inspectors, 44,602 only having been reweighed during 1918-19. I^uMJjlie 
same periods the municipal inspectors reweighed 469,396 and 378,370, respectively^ 

While acting as public weighers-that is, weighing merchandise just received from 
the States at the importers' request, to determine the exact weight of same-oi^ 
inspector rendered 236 reports which were later certified to, which represents an 
irc?^e of 111? or 88.8 per cent, over last year, when 125 certificates of weighings were 

^During the year the bureau handled 12,520 communications, an increase of 2 578, 
OT 25.93 per cent, over the previous year. Of these, 8,630 were received and 3,890 

"^^ Statement No. 14 conveys an exact idea of the amount of work done in each mumci- 
palitv by the insular and municipal inspectors in the inspection and test of the mstru- 
Tnents and of the amount of packages reweighed. . .i. • i j •+ s«;n 

Concerning the organization of the work of the bureau throughout the island it wiU 
not be amiss te state that due te the constant efforts of the bureau te the end that each 
municipality be equipped with a weights and measures test set, we are about to reach 

^^eS'municipalities have appropriated funds te purchase test sets. ^ These sete have 
already been ordered and are expected to come from the States shortly, pi these 10 
municipaUties, 7 do not possess any kind of equipment and 3 are using msular out- 
fits These thJ-ee sets when released, will be assigned to the mumcipalities of Patillas, 
Corozal, and Villalba, which have been unable to order an equipment for themselves 
:and thereupon there will not be a single municipality in the island without its 

^"^Bv ^ue of Act No. 60, approved June 19, 1919, the inspection of the electric, 
gas, and water meters was put under the jurisdiction of the bureau of weights and 

™T^S, as I stated in my report last year, it is diflacult if not impracticable to 
enforce the above-mentioned law on account of the failure pf the l^f f ^^ure^to incl^ 
in its budgetary appropriations the necessary funds required in Act 60 to carry out 
ite provisions, ever^ effort has been made to organize saicf service if not m its entirety 
a^&^tas far as the means at our disposal permit. To this end advice and instruc- 
^o^weTe solicited from the Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC., and catalogues 
were asked from several manufacturers. In January last, one of the two inspectors 
-Drovided for in the budget was temporarily appointed, so that he might study the 
So^es and make the necessary purchases of instrumente and other materials 
Seded, and prepare the forms, regulations, eto., that will be needed m this new 
Service In February orders were placed with several manufacturers for mstru- 
ments, and to date the bureau has not received the same, with the exception of one 
instrument to inspect gas meters. No doubt this delay has been caused by the 
■strikes and other borders from which the American industries have suffered and are 

^^''mfli^^^ of the inspection and test of all the weighing and measuring instruments 
made by the insular and the municipal inspectors throughout the island appear m 

"^^hl^thl^g^nd total of apparatus and weights tested this year by the inspectors, which 
reached to 189,183, an increase is observed of 13,459, or 7.65 per cent, over last year 
when 175,724 were tested; 78.93 per cent of the total of apparatus tested were fuund 
to be correct. Last year the percentage of correct apparatus was 79.68. It is apparent 
that the decrease in the percentage^ch started in 1917-18 has contmued this year 
and we affirm ourselves in the belief that such a decrease is due to the need of economy 
imposed upon the people by the high cost of merchandise in general, which forces the 
owSSs to keep their old instruments in use as long as possible. Formeriy, an instru- 
ment was immediately substituted by a new one when it became incorrect or o d, 
whereas to-day most of the merchants have their instruments repaired, and logically 
these old instruments are bound to be found incorrect in a greater proportion than 

^^ li^th/vercen^e of the correct instruments had decreased, it is logical to expect 
that the percentages of the instruments rejected for repairs have increased as compared 
^ the ones ofthe previous years. The percentage of the instruments rejected for 
rer^irs was 15.51 this year, while it was 15.31 the year before, and that of the confis- 
cated instruments reached 4.52, against 3.92 for the previous year. 



KEPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 
Table No. 1 — Instruments i 



87 





Cor- 
rect. 


Per 

cent.i 


Last 
year's 
per- 
cent- 
age. 


Cor- 
rected 
by in- 
spec- 
tor. 


Con- 
demned 
for re- 
pairs. 


Per 

cent.i 


Last 
year's 
per 
cent- 
age. 


Con- 
demned 

and 
confis- 
cated. 


Per 
oent.i 


Last 
year's 
per- 
cent- 
age., 


Total. 


New. 


Counter scales 

Spring scales . 


9,201 
2,327 
2,548 
88,115 
19, 102 
20, 726 
7,303 


86.11 
84.40 
76.77 
71.86 
95.04 
93.88 
95.67 


89.88 
86.98 
81.58 
73.86 
96.30 
95.28 
96.75 


374 

75 

152 

1,365 

4 


960 
218 
588 
26,985 
243 
160 
195 


8.98 

7.90 
17.71 
22.01 

1.21 
.73 

2.55 


7.86 

8.38 

13.68 

17.20 

.49 

.54 

.86 


150 

137 

31 

6,152 

752 
1,189 

131 


1.40 
4.97 
.93 
5.02 
3.74 
5.39 
1.71 


1.25 
3.74 
.78 
4.39 
3.08 
4.14 
2.15 


10,685 
2,757 
3,319 
122,617 
20,097 
22,075 
7,633 


996 
817 


Platform scales 

Weights 


60 
11,467 


Liquid measures 

Linear measures 

Miscellaneous 2 


2,330 

10,141 

1,816 


Total 


149,322 


78.93 


79. 6S 


31,970 


3 29,349 


15.51 


15.31 


3 8,542 


4.52 


3.92 


189, 183 


27,617 







1 This percentage is of the total number of this class of instruments tested. 

2 Computing scales, counter tacks, milk bottles, measuring pumps, glass graduates, etc. 

3 Total number of instruments in use incorrect, 39,861, or 21.07 per cent; 1918-19,20.32 per cent; 1917-18, 
18.25iper cent; 1916-17, 18.14 per cent. 

Table No. 2 shows the number of new instruments, weights, etc., imported from the 
States or manufactured in Porto Rico presented to the bureau for inspection and test 
prior to their being sold or offered for sale. T^e grand total of this class of apparatus 
(class 1) is 27,617 this year, or 703 more than last year. 

Table No. 2. — Class 1. New instruments tested before being offered for sale. 





Scales. 


Weights. 


Measures. 


Milk 
bot- 
tles. 


Drug- 
gists' 
scales. 


Drug- 
gists' 
weights. 


Glass 
gradu- 
ates. 






Coun- 
ter. 


Plat- 
form. 


Spring. 


Liquid. 


Linear. 


Total. 


San Juan 


175 
723 
68 
30 


28 
2 
11 


458 
230 
103 
26 


8,660 

2,073 

579 

155 


775 
370 
803 
382 


5,694 

3,428 

4 

1,015 


37 


16 


602 


982 
179 


17,427 


Ponce 


7,005 
1,568 
1,617 


Mayaguez 

Other towns 




























Total 


996 


50 


817 


11,467 


2,330 


10, 141 


37 


16 


602 


1,161 


27,617 



Table No. 3. — Instruments rejected for repairs on first inspection and sealed or confiscated 
as incorrect and not susceptible of repairs upon reinspection. 





Counter 
scales. 


Spring 
scales. 


Platform 
scales.i 


Weights. 


Liquid 
measures. 


Linear 
measures. 




i 


«-d 


1 


si 


CQ 


5S 


1 

to 


«fl'S 


i 


11 


i 


A^ 


1914-15 


P.ct 

61 

75 

77 

8L7 

94 

94 


P.ct. 

39 

25 

23 

18.3 

6 

6 


P.ct. 

55 

57 

47 

48.3 

71 

55 


p.ct. 

45 

43 

53 

51.7 

29 

45 


P.ct. 

88 

88 

89 

94.5 

96 

96 


p.ct. 
12 
12 
11 

5.5 

4 

4 


P.ct. 

80 

76 

85 

91.8 

89 

94 


P.ct. 
20 
24 
15 

8.2 
11 

6 


p.ct. 


P.ct. 


p.ct. 


P.cU 


1915-16. . . 










1916-17 










1917-18 


60 
50 


40 
50 
100 


54 
59 
72 


46 


1918-19 


41 


1919-20 


28 







1 Large-capacity platform scales not included. 

As a whole, this year the percentages shown on the above table have increased as 
compared with those of previous years. There is a notable decrease with regard to 
spring scales, and as to liquid measures none was sealed after having been rejected 
for repairs, the explanation being that the spring scales are seldom susceptible of 
repairs and liquid measures are rarely found in a condition allowing of repair. 

If yearly there has been an increase in the percentages of apparatus rejected for 
repairs and sealed upon reinspection, it is logical to expect that the percentages of 
those confiscated upon reinspection should have decreased, with the exception of the 
spring scales and the liquid measures. 



88 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RIOO. 



If last year it was considered as a real achievement of the bureau, through its peri- 
odical inspections, to lower to 3.04 grams the average error per pound found in the 
weights tested throughout the stores of the island, this year can not be less satisfac- 
tory in view of the results obtained. As will be seen in Table No. 4, the average this 
year is only 2.4 grams per pound. If it is remembered that the permissible variation 
IS 1.5 grams per pound and that this year's average exceeds it by only nine- tenths 
of a gram, the conclusion is to be reached that the use of incomplete weights in Porto 
Rico to defraud the public has nearly disappeared. The errors found to-day are due 
to the usual wear of the material and to the excessive oxidation so noticeable in 
Porto Rico. 

Table No. 4. — Errors found in weights tested. 



Size of weights. 



Weights. 



Total 
weights. 



Total of 
errors. 



8 pounds . 
4 pounds. 
2 pounds. 

1 pound.. 
8 ounces . . 
4 ounces . . 

2 ounces.. 
1 ounce... 



Total. 



Number. 
204 
2,780 
2,900 
3,820 
3, .508 
2,720 
2,701 
2,012 



20,648 



Pounds. 

1,632 

11,120 

5,800 

3,820 

1,754 

680 

338 

125 



Orams. 

1,319 

15,584 

7,511 

10,657 

11,953 

6,760 

4,356 

2,512 



60,652 



Grams. 

Average error per pound, 1914-15 8. 18 

Average error per pound, 1916-17 3. 33 

Average error per pound, 1917-18 3. 15 

Average error per pound, 1918-19 3. 04 

Average error per pound, 1919-20 2. 40 

The inspection and test of the scales used by the centrales to weigh the sugar cane 
bought from the colonos was carried out during the last crop season in accordance with 
the policy inaugiirated in 1918. 

Table No. 5 gives a r^sum^ of this inspection. At first sight it will be noted that a 
number of railroad scales this year is smaller than that of last year, while the number 
of cart scales has increased by approximately an equal number. This evidently 
may be accounted for to an erroneous previous classification, whereby cart scales 
must have been classified as railroad scales for the mere fact that a narrow-gauge 
portable track had been laid over their platform. This difference, however, does not 
matter much as a number of scales are changed yearly from place to place, old ones 
are abandoned and new ones installed in their stead or are mounted at new sites, and 
it does not lessen the exactitude of the data offered here. In order, therefore, to 
establish a better comparison between this year's inspection and last year's, we have 
summed up the railroad scales with the cart scales obtaining thus a total of 325 scales 
inspected this year, of which 228 were sealed as correct, or 70 per cent, while last 
year the percentage was 72 per cent. 

The counterweights used on some of these scales were found to be in a slightly 
better condition than previously, 98 per cent having been sealed as against 97 per 
cent in 1919. 

Fourteen owners of scales have been denounced to the courts of the island for using 
incorrect scales. Of these 14 cases, only 5 have been tried in courts to date, the 
courts having acquitted the defendants in 3 and imposed a fine in 2 cases. 

Table No. 5. — Inspection of large-capacity platform scales used to weigh sugar cane. 





Found correct and 
, sealed. 


Adjusted by the 
inspectors. 


Rejected for repairs. 






Num- 
ber. 


Per 
cent. 


Last 

year's 

^r 

cent. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 
cent. 


Last 
year's 

per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 
cent. 


Last 
year's 

per 
cent. 


Total. 


Railroad scales 

Cart scales 


42 

186 
8S5 


78 
68 
98 


70.9 

73 

97 


6 
12 


11 
5 


19.8 
17.6 
1.5 


6 
73 
19 


11 

27 

2 


9.3 
9.4 
1.5 


54 
271 


Weights 


904 











EEPOBT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETABY. 89 

'J^The bureau's vigilance upon the deliveries of cane made by the colonos to the cen- 
trales was increased this year. Outside of the attention paid by the local inspectors, 
several tours of inspection were made by the insular inspectors. Out of a total of 330 
carts and carsreweighed, 297, or 90 per cent, were found correct. Six carts were found 
with errors in the weights credited to the sellers or colonos. These weights were 
from 10 up to 100 pounds smaller than they should have been, the average error being 
27 pounds per cart; two railroad cars had errors of 70 and 180 pounds, respectively. 
Of these different shortages only two were denounced to the courts because the inter- 
ested parties in the other cases refused to appear as prosecuting witnesses. These 
two cases were tried and the weighers were fined $3 and $5, respectively, by the court. 

The insular inspectors during their said tours of inspection also ascertained the 
weight or tare of the carts or cars used to transport the colonos' cane to the centrales, 
this tare being deducted in each case from the gross weight indicated by the scale. 
One hundred and forty-seven carts and cars were retared, 67, or 45 per cent, being 
found correct; 64 carts, or 43 per cent, and cars had errors against the colonos, the 
classification being as follows: Thirty-four cars with errors from 60 up to 1,075 pounds, 
the average being 240 pounds per car; 29 narrow-gauge cars with errors that varied 
from 10 to 325 pounds, the average being 50 pounds; and 1 cart with an error of 60 
pounds. 

The inspectors swore to 11 complaints against the parties that used these cars marked 
with a false tare and 2 complaints against parties that were using cars without marking 
the tares on same. Of the 11 complaints first mentioned, 5 have been tried by the 
courts, 4 receiving a verdict of not guilty and the other being fined $50. I can 
not resist the temptation to make public the reasons given by the courts to justify 
their decisions in two cases, so as to show some of the difficulties found by the bureau 
in the enforcement of the provisions of the weights and measures act. Sometimes the 
court is very lenient toward the guilty party; sometimes it is not easy to secure the 
cooperation as a witness of the defrauded party due to his personal obligation toward 
the owner of the central. In one of the two-mentioned cases it was proved that the 
colonos had been defrauded in 6 cars that had been reweighed of 60, 100, 60, 80, 180, 
and 60 pounds of cane, respectively. The court declared that this difference did not 
amount to much and that the party was not guilty. The other case was for differences 
in the tare in 7 cars whereby the colonos were losing 30, 30, 40, 40, 40, 50, and 50 
pounds, respectively. The errors were proven in court to be true, but the judge, in 
view of the fact that the central presented as witnesses in its favor certain colonos 
who declared that they were satisfied with the weights credited to them by the 
central, acquitted the central. 

This year 565,967 packages were reweighed after they had been bought by the public 
and before they had left the merchants' stores, the total weight or measure being as 
follows — 775,464 pounds, 17,308 yards, and 9,107 quarts. During the year 1918-19 
only 433.817 packages had been reweighed, so that there has been an increase this 
year of 132,150, or 30 per cent. 

We observed a decrease in the percentages of correct packages in 1918-19, and this 
decrease has continued, this year's percentage being 71.92 per cent of the total of 
packages reweighed, as against 73.06 per cent the year before. Nevertheless, if we 
add the total of heavy packages to the total of correct ones the percentage will reach 
this year to 93.39 per cent, as against 93.50, a difference that is hardly noticeable. 

The percentage of light packages is slightly higher this year by an equal amount, 
it being 6.50 in 1918-19, while it increased to 6.61 this year. 

Table No. 6 conveys a complete information of the number of packages reweighed 
in each municipality by the insular and municipal inspectors and by the insular 
poHce. 

Table No. 6. — Reweighing of packages. 

(Table omitted. Copy on file in Bureau of Insular Affairs.) 

In Table No. 7 are shown, duly classified, the violations against the weights and 
measures act and its rules and regulations, as well as against other laws related to the 
work of the bureau of weights and measures which have been denounced to the 
courts by the insular and municipal inspectors and by the insular police during the 
fiscal year just ended. 

Nine hundi:ed and eighty-four complaints were filed this year while the year before 
we had 1,042, or 58 more than during 1920. Those complaints were filed by — in 
sular inspectors, 643; municipal inspectors, 227; and insular police, 114, while the 
year before we had 525, 202, and 317, respectively. It is clear that the decrease is 
due to the smaller number of complaints filed by tne insular police, while the insular 
and municipal inspectors were more active than during the previous year in the per- 
secution of frauds. This decrease in the number of complaints filed by the insular 



90 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



police is easily explained by the fact that the police were very busy most of the year 
m maintaining order during numerous strikes all over the island. Many complaints 
filed have not been acted upon by the courts, as these have been occupied most of the 
time in the registration of voters during the last months of the fiscal year for the 
coming elections. 

This year we secured 785 convictions, or 79.78 per cent. Last year the convictions 
were 82.15 per cent. These convictions are distributed as follows: Cases presented 
by insular inspectors, 87 per cent; by municipal inspectors, 77 per cent; and by the 
insular police, 74 per cent. 

Table No. 7. — Violations. 



Number. 



Convicted. 



Absolved. 



With- 
drawn. 



Fines. 



Cases denounced by — 
Insular inspectors. . . . 
Municipal inspectors 
Insular police 

Total, 1919-20 

Total, 1918-19 

Total, 1917-18 

Total, 1916-17 

Total, 1915-16 

Total, 1914-15 



643 

227 
114 I 



524 

176 

85 



100 
42 
26 



$2,370.00 

1,117.00 

362.00 



984 
1,042 
1,182 
1,345 
1,046 

681 



785\ 
I 79. 77/ 

856\ 

» 82. 15/ 

1,043\ 

1 88. 24/ 

1,215\ 

190 / 

9241 
188 

573' 



168 
160 
137 
104 



3,849.00 
4,118.60 
4,845.0a 
4,102.00 



1 Per cent. 

Table No. 8 indicates the fines imposed by the courts, and they reach a total of 
$3,849. The average fineis $4.90, wh,ile it was $4.81 last year. The $1, $2, and $a 
fines represent 63 per cent of the total number of fines, this being ample proof of the 
lenity of our courts, as a rule, in punishing this class of transgressions. Though the 
percentage of $5 fines has increased this year from 18, we had last year, to 25, the per- 
centage of $10 fines has decreased from 4 to 2 for the same periods of time, and no 
increase is noticeable in the percentage of the fines imposed from $10 to $50. These 
data go to demonstrate that our judges lack severity in most cases in the punishment 
of these frauds against the buying public. 

Table No. 8. — Classification of fines according to their amounts. 



Amount. 



$1- 
12. 
13. 
$4. 
$5. 
16. 
$7. 

ts. 

110 
$15 



Number 
of fines. 


Total. 


112 


1112 


253 


506 


131 


3a3 


23 


92 


201 


1,005 


3 


18 


8 


56 


4 


32 


16 


160 


4 


60 



Amount. 



120 

$25 

$40 

$50 

$60 

$75 

$200 

Total 




3,84& 



Table No. 9 shows the sections of the weights and measures law and of its rules and 
regulations as well as other laws violated during the year which were denounced to 
the courts. 

The greatest number of infractions refers to section 15 of the weights and measures 
law, which prohibits short weight and measure in the goods sold or offered for sale. 
The number of such violations is 359 this year, and if we add the 95 violations of Law 
No. 13 of 1917, mostly for short- weight bread, we shall have a total of 452, or 57.5 
per cent of the total violations denounced to the courts during the year. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 
Table No. 9. — Detail of violations. 



91 



Sections of the law violated and denounced to the courts. 



Con- 
victed. 



Absolved 
and with- 
drawn. 



Section 15, short weight or measure 

Act No. 13 of 1917, regulating the weight of loaves of bread, requiring indication of 

the price per pound, etc 

Section 14, defective or faulty instruments or weights 

Section 19, alteration to weights and measures after having been sealed 

Section 17, requiring net weight of contents in boxes, packages, etc 

Section 10, weights or measures in use without having been tested 

Section 12 and paragraph 20, use of new weights or measures without having been 

tested 



Section 18, marking of false weights or false tare on boxes, packages, etc 

Section 16, use of illegal weights and measures 

Section 13, failure to present weights and measures to the inspectors upon request . 
Municipal ordinance . 



Paragraph 21, importing and selling weights or instruments without submitting 
them to be tested 



Section 470, Penal Code, defrauding of labor 

Paragraph 17, removal of seals or condemning tags 

Paragraphs 24 and 10, hindering inspectors in their work. 



Total . 



785 



115 
46 

e 

7 
3 

7 

5. 
1 
5. 



199- 



FEES. 

The collection of fees in this office for services performed during the fiscal yeai 
was as follows: 

Filing and registration fees, corporation papers $7, 928. 85 

Registration of domestic trade-marks 2, 444. 60 

Registration of United States patents and trade-marks 280. 00 

Authentication of signatures and certified copies of documents 618. 70^ 

Passi>orts 1, 239. 00 

Himting licenses 1, 230. 00 

Total 13,741.15. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The expenditures of this office during the fiscal year 1919-20 were as follows: 



Appropriations. 



Office of 
executive 
secretary. 



Bmreau of 
weights 

and 
measinres. 



Bureau of 
supplies, 
prmting, 
and trans- 
portation. 



Total. 



Salaries , 

Stationery and printing 

Furniture 

Postage and freight , 

Telegraph and telephone , 

Inciaentals , 

Printing and publication of laws 

Traveling expenses 

Equipment of weights and measures 

Purchase of apparatus for testing gas, electric, and 

water meters 

Additional temporary help 



133,089.70 
679.66 



$15,939.29 
525.88 



164.90 

11.53 

700.41 

2,389.85 



1,159.42 
38.07 
710.33 



134,554.19 
1,365.99 
284.50 
245.26 
445.20 
303.42 



3,735.86 
561. 62 

234.80 



640.22 



NEW YORK OFFICE. 



Salaries 

Rent 

Stationery and printing.. 
Telegrapn and telephone. 



4,181.31 

847.88 

567. 72 

94.66 



Total. 



37,036.05 



22, 905. 27 



143,450.35 



183,583.18. 
2,571.53 

284.50 
1,569.58. 

494.80 
1,714.16 
2,389.85 
4,276.0& 

561. 62 

234.8a 
20.00 



4,181.31 

847. 8& 

567. 72 

94.6a 



103,391.67 



1 To this amount $1,891.42 must be added, being expenses incurred and not paid for on June 30, 1920. 

In closing this report I wish to state that the help given to me by the assistant 
executive secretary, the chief of the bureau of supplies, printing, and transportation, 
and the chief of the bureau of weights and measures, in the performance of my 



92 



REPORT OF THE GOVERKOR OF PORTO RICO. 



numerous and evergrowing duties, has been very valuable, and that the work per- 
formed by them and by all the other employees of this office during the year deserves 
the highest commendation. 
Very respectfully, 

R. SiACA Pacheco, 
Executive Secretary of Porto Rico. . 
The Governor, San Juan, P. R. 

.Statement No. 1. — List of commissioners of deeds for Porto Rico in the United States 
appointed by the governor of Porto Rico, and whose commissions are still in force on 
June SO, 1920. 



Name and address. 



Appointed* 



Braman, Ella F., 120 Broadway, New York City 

Dearborn, John, 27 South Main Street, Penacook 

Hesse, Charles Henrv, 2017 East Eager Street, Baltimore 

Michelsohn, Adolph, room 430, Old Birks Building, Montreal 

Miranda, Ramon, 11 Broadway, New York City 

Mountcastle, G. (5., post-office box 927, Richmond 

Worst, John S., 1124 Laud Title Building, Philadelphia 



New York 

New Hampshire 

Maryland 

Providence of Quebec, 
Canada. 

New York 

Virginia 

Pennsylvania 



July 18,1918 
Aug. 29,1919 
June 1, 1917 
Sept. 28, 1917 

Mar. 19,1920 
Dec. 8, 1917 
July 2, 1918 



Statement No. 2. — Dom^tic corporations registered in the office of the executive secre- 
tary during the fiscal year 1919-20. 



Name. 


Location of 

principal place 

of business. 


Principal purposes. 


Total au- 
thorized 
capital 
stock. 


Paid in 
capital 
with 
which 
corpora- 
tion was 
to com- 
mence 
business. 


Porto Rico Clay Products Co. 


San Juan 

do 

Humacao 

San Juan 

do 

do 


Clay products. . .. 


$50,000 
100,000 
25,000 
150,000 

125,000 

25,000 

50,000 

1,000,000 

5,000 
60,000 
25,000 
200, 000 

20,000 
50,000 

50,000 

25, 000 

200,000 
30,000 

50,000 
100,000 

100,000 

2, 000, 000 

100,000 

50,000 

50,000 
200,000 
500,000- 

100,000 


$2 100 


The Northern Chemical Co. (Inc.). . 
Teatro Oriente de Humacao (Inc.). 


Drugs and chemicals 

Theatrical business 


5,000 
1 100 


The Union Comercial Corporation. . 

West India Salt & Chemical Co. . . . 
American Commercial Co 


Dealers in automobiles and 
accessories. 

Salt and other chemicals 

Mercantile 


80,000 

1,000 
3,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,050 
1,000 
2,000 


Antilles Trading Co . . . 


do .. . 


do... . 


Porto Rico Motion Picture Pro- 
ductions (InQ.). 
Teatro Lares . . . 


do 

Lares 


Motion picture productions. 
Theatrical business 


The Rosita Agricultural Co 


San Juan 

do 

.do 


Fruits 


A. Erie Sumersille & Co. (Inc.) 


Mercantile 


La Constructora del Hogar, Aso- 
ciacion Cooperativa de Construc- 
ciones, de Ahorros y Prestamos. 

Serra Hermanos 


Cooperative building, sav- 
ing, and loaning. 

Drugs and chemicals 

Electric lighting and power. 

Food products 


Bayamon 

Adjuntas 

San Juan 

Yauco 


5,000 


Corporacion Central de Luz y 

Fuerza Electrica, Adjuntas, P. R. 

Porto Rico Food Products Cor- 


1,000 
1,000 


poration. 
Yauco Moving Picture Co 


Dealers in and exhibitors 
of motion pictures. 

Real estate development 

Transportation and busi- 
nesses incidental thereto. 

Real estate brokers 

Dealers in petroleum and 
petroleum products. 

Banking. .... 


14,000 


Puerta de Tierra Development Co. . 
San Sebastian Transportation and 
Basiness Corporation. 

Pesquera & Pesquera (Inc.) 

The Texas Co., Porto Rico (Inc.).. 

Banco Agricola de Aguadilla. - 


San Juan 

San Sebastian. 

San Juan 

do 

Aguadilla 

Ponce 


1,000 
18,000 

3,000 
1,000 

3,550 


Ponce Electric Co . 


Electric street railways 

Dealers in automobiles and 
accessories. 

do : 


1 000 


The Borinquen Trading Corpora- 
tion. 
'The Porto Rico Auto Supplies Co. 


San Juan 

do 

Mayaguez 

San Juan 

do 


ijooo 

1 000 


(Inc.). 
Porto Rico Bay Rum Co. (Inc.). . . . 
Porto Rico Lnrnher Co 


Manufacturing bay rum 

Dealers in lumber 


3,000 
65,000 
25 000 


The Porto-Rico Development Co. 


Holding fairs. . . . 


(Inc.). 
Leon Israel & Bros., Porto Rico 


do ... 


Mercantile 


10 000 


(Inc.). 









BEPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 93 

Statement No. 2. — Domestic corporations registered in the office of the executive secre- 
tary during the fiscal year i^iP-j^O— Continued. 



Name. 



Location of 

principal place 

of business. 



Principal purposes. 



Total au- 
thorized 
capital 
stock. 



Paid in 
capital 
with 
which 
corpora- 
tion was 
to com- 
mence 
business. 



Plaza Fruit Co. of Porto Rico , 

Elton Warner Co 

Porto Rican & American Insur- 
ance Co. 

J. Riera & Co. (Inc.) 

The Cayey Industrial Corporation. . 

Compania General de Cines y Es- 
pectaculos. 

The Central Machete Co 

Credito y Ahorro Ponceno 

J. M. J31anco(Inc.) 

Madera, Garcia, Tobacco Co 

Trujillo Alto Marble Co. (Inc.) 

Lippitt & Mehrhof (Inc.) 



Farmacia Ketty (Inc.) 

F. U. Wells & Co. (Inc.) 

Import, Sales & Business Agency 
(Inc.). 

The Porto Rico Trading & Com- 
mission Co. (Inc.). 

Borinquen Film & Moving Picture 
Co. 

Borinquen Novelty Co 



Colonos de Corsica (Inc.) 

Santiago A. Panzardi (Inc.).. 



Calvin Detrick (Inc.) 

The Porto Rico Nursery Corpora- 
tion. 

Central Defensa (Inc.) 

Portorican Lloyds 

Casanovas & Co., Succs 

Porto Rico Publishing & Printing 
Co. (Inc.). 

The Pharmaceutical Co. of Porto 
Rico (Inc.). 

Tipografia Nacional (Inc.) 

Teatro de Caguas (Inc.) 

Farmacia Nazano (Inc.) 

Goethals, Wilford & Boyd (Inc.), 
of Porto Rico. 

The San Juan Ginnery Co. (Inc.)... 



The Porto Rico Electroplating Co. 

(Inc.). 
The Tropical Fruit Juice Co. (Inc.).. 

Rossy & Compania (Inc.) 

West Indies Trade Co. (Inc.) 

J. P. Bouret (Inc.) 

Costa & Santini Realty Co 



Santini Fertilizer Co . 



J.J. Font & Co. (Inc.).... 
Aguas Buenas Cine (Inc.). 



The Mayaguez Box & Furniture 
Co. 

Total 



14748—20- 



Bayamon. 
San Juan. . 
....do 



Ponce 

Cayey 

San Juan.. 



Guayama. 

Ponce 

San Juan. . 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 



Guayama. 
San Juan.. 
do.... 



do.... 

Ponce 

San Juan.. 



Rincon..., 
San Juan. . 



.do. 
.do. 



Caguas 

San Juan.. 
Mayaguez.. 
San Juan.. 



.do. 



Ponce 

Caguas 

Mayaguez. 
San Juan.. 



..do.... 



.do. 



do 

Mayaguez 

San Juan 

do 

do 



.do. 



do 

Aguas Buenas. 

Mayaguez 



Fruits 

Bees and their products. 
Insurance 



Mercantile 

Bakers 

Dealers in motion pictures 
and theatrical busmess. 

Sugar , 

Banking , 

Drugs and chemicals 

Dealers in tobacco , 

Quarrying marble 

Establishing and conduct- 
ing hospitals. 

Drugs and chemicals 

Mercantile 

....do 



.do. 



Dealers in and exhibitors of 
motion pictures. 

Manufacturers of embroid- 
ered novelties and dress 
goods. 

Sugar 

Dealers in automobiles and 
accessories. 

Mercantile 

Operating gardens and plant 
nurseries. 

Sugar 

Insurance 

Dealers in coffee 

Publishing and printing 



Drugs and chemicals . 



PubUshing and printing 

Theatrical business 

Drugs and chemicals 

Mercantile and ship sup- 
pliers and agents. 

Dealers in and manufac- 
turers of cotton and cot- 
ton goods. 

Electroplating 



Manufacturing of fruit juices . 

Manufacturers of soaps 

Mercantile 

Jewelers 

Builders and leasers of a 
fertilizer plant. 

Manufacturers of and deal- 
ers in fertiUzers. 

Drugs and chemicals 

Exhibitors of motion pic- 
tures 

Manufacturers of boxes and 
furniture. 



120,000 

50,000 

250,000 

100,000 
5,000 
50,000 

1,000,000 
1,200,000 
600,000 
150,000 
50,000 
50,000 

5,000 
50,000 
30,000 

25,000 

50,000 

20,000 

500,000 
500,000 

150,000 
25,000 

500,000 
200,000 
50,000 
75,000 

200,000 

100,000 

200,000 

10,000 

150,000 

25,000 



100,000 

25,000 
50,000 
20,000 
350,000 
100,000 

25,000 

250,000 
6,000 

100,000 



11,000 

1,000 

60,000 

2,000 
1,460 
6,000 

1,000 

600,000 

65,000 

16,000 

1,000 

1,200 

3,000 
4,500 
13,200 

1,000 

1,200 

1,000 



1,200 
7,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 

20,000 

4,000 

1,000 

15,000 

3,700 
3,000 
9,100 
10,000 

1,000 



1,000 

1,000 
4,000 
2,500 
7,200 
1,000 

1,000 

30,000 
1,050 

6,000 



12,756,000 



1,162,110 



94 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Statement No. 3. — Domestic corporations dissolved during the fiscal year 1919-20. 



Name. 



Location of prin- 
cipal place of 
business. 



Credit© y Ahorro Ponceiio i 

The Porto Rico Pharmaceutical Snecialty Co 

Panzardi, Mayoral & Co. (Inc.) 

The Arecibo Press Co 

The Insular Motor Co 

Santurce Abattoir (Inc.) 

The Porto Rico Merchandise Stamp Co 

The Insular Mercantile Agency (Inc.) 

West Indies Coco- Fiber Co 

San Juan-Santurce Line (Inc.) 

The Troj)ical Industrial Co 

Corporacion Depositaria de Azucares de Puerto Rico 

Aguadilla Lighter, Storage & Transportation Co 

Monte-Flores Industrial Corporation 

Porto Rico Confection Co. (inc.) 

Malatrasi Hotels Co 

The Porto Rico Aerial Transportation Co 

The Porto Rico Electroplating Co. (Inc.) 2 

Sociedad Recreativa Larena 

Porto Rico Lumber Co 



Ponce. 
Anasco. 
Ponce. 
Arecibo. 
San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Aguadilla. 
Ponce. 
San Juan. 

Do. 
Mayaguez. 
San Juan. 
Lares. 
San Juan. 



1 A corporation formed during Spanish regime, the assets and liabilities of which were taken over by 
another corporation incorporated in 1919-20, under the same name. 

« A corporation formed in 1918-19, and not the one incorporated in 1919-20, subsequently to this disso- 
lution. 

Statement No. 4. — Foreign corporations registered in the office of the executive secretary 
during the fiscal year 1919-20. 



Name and location. 


Agent and address. 


Principal purposes. 


Total 

authorized 

capital 

stock. 


Paid in 
capital. 


Insurance Co. of North Amer- 
ica, Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. Cohn & Co. (Inc.), New 
York,N.Y. 

The Reliance Marine Insur- 
ance Co. (Ltd.), Liverpool, 
England. 

International Planters Cor- 
poration, New York, N. Y. 

Porto Rico Sales Corporation, 
Boston, Mass. 

Niagara Fire Insurance Co., 
New York, N. Y. 

Max Cans & Son (Inc.), New 
York,N.Y. 

The London Assurance, Lon- 
don. England. 

American Sumatra Tobacco 
Co., Atlanta, Ga. 

Durlach Bros. (Inc.), WU- 
mington, Del. 

Pan-American Life Insurance 


Korber & Co. (Inc.), San 

Juan. 
Luis Iturrino, Caguas 

Villar & Co., successor, 
San Juan. 

H. B. Hodgetts, San Juan. 

Charles L. Carpenter, 

Aguirre. 
Villar & Co., successor, 

San Juan. 
Frank Becerra, Caguas — 

Sobrinos de Izquierdo & 

Co., San Juan. 
Victor K. Ettlinger, San 

Juan. 
Milton I. Durlach, Caguas. 

Clittord S. Foy, San Juan.. 

Alfred F. Rubel, Rio 

Piedras. 
Timothy Souther, Vega 

Alta. 
Helen W. Courtois, San 

Juan. 


Fire, marine, and in- 
land insurance. 
Tobacco packers 

Marine insurance 

Exporters and im- 
porters of leaf to- 
bacco. 

Dealers in sugar 

Fire, marine, and auto- 
mobile insurance. 

Growers of and dealers 
in tobacco. 

Insurance in all 
branches. 

Growers of and dealers 
in tobacco. 

Dealers in tobacco 

Life insurance 


$4,000,000 

201,200 

2,500,000 

2,150,000 

25,000 
1,000,000 
300,000 
10,000,000 
17,000,000 
750,000 
1,000,000 


14,000,000 
165,200 
500,000 

819,600 

25,000 

1,000,000 

70,000 

3,741,37.S 

15,496,385 

750,000 

1,000,000 

200,000 

10,800 


Co.-, New Orleans, La. 
E. Heller & Bro. (Inc.), New 

York,N.Y. 
Blue & Gold Orchards (Inc.), 

Providence, R.I. 
Weil A Weil (Inc.), New 

York,N.Y. 


Manufacturers of hand- 
kerchiefs. 
Fruits 


200,000 
20,000 


Makers of hand em- 
broidery. 


150,000 


150,000 


Total 




39,296,200 


27,928,360 









EEPOET OF THE EXECTJTIVB SECKETABY. 



95 



Statement No. 5. — Foreign corporations entered in the records of the office of the executive 
secretary during the fiscal year 1919-20 as having ceased to do business in Porto Rico, 



Name. 



Porto Rican- American Tobacco Co.. 

Vega Baja Fruit & Land Co 

The Fajardo Sugar Co 

Porto Rice Canning Co 

Buffalo & Porto Rico Fruit Co 

Second Oneida Fruit Co 

The Graham & Granger Fruit Co 

South Atlantic Fruit Co 

Suburban Fruit Co 

The Sherman Porto Rican Fruit Co. 

La Aldea Fruit Co 

The P. J, Carlin Construction Co 

Porto Rico Coal Co. (Inc.) 

La Isabella Grove (Inc.) 

Hamilton <t Chambers Co. (Inc.) 

Purdy & Henderson Co 

The Corbin-Griffith Fruit Co. (Inc.). 



State where 
organized. 



New Jersey . 
New York.. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

New Jersey. 
New York.. 

do 

....do 

.....do 

....do 

....do 

.do.. 

.do.. 



New Jersey. 
New York.. 



Principal place ©f 
business in Perto 
Rico. 



San Juan. 
Ve?a Baja^ 
Pajard(?, 
AfayagnezT.' 
Barceloneta. 
Manati, 
Bayamon. 
Rio Piedras. 

Do. 
Barceloneta. 
Manati. 
San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 
Cayey. 
San Juan. 
Vega Baja. 



Statement No. 6. — List of domestic corporations in legal existence on June 30 y 1920. 



Name. 



Location of 

principal place 

of busmess. 



Principal purposes. 



Banco Popular de San Juan 

Banco Territorial y Agricola de Puerto Pico 

Caja de Economias y Prestamos de San German. 

The American Grocery & Ship Supply Co 

Ponce Agricultural & Industrial Co 

Central Cambalache 

The Juncos Central Co 

The Fajardo Fruit Co 

The Caribbean Fruit Co 

The Yabucoa Sugar Co 

Porto Rico Pineapple Co 

Alta Vista Fruit Co 

Arecibo Orange & Pineapple Co 

The Mayaguez Fruit Cultivating Co. of Porto 
Rico. 

Enterprise Fruit Co 

The Insular Dock Co 

Plazuela Sugar Co 

Sabana Seca Plantation 

Miramar Apartment House Co 

Central Eureka (Inc.) 

The Ponce Lighter Co 



Cerro Gordo Fruit Co 

The Mesilla Fruit Co 

Loiza Sugar Co 

Sea Island Grape Fruit Co 

Mayaguez Sugar Co 

The McMurtrie-Guiler Co 

Consejo Construction Co 

Gillies <fe Woodward 

Santa Isabel Sugar Co 

Nathaniel A. Walcott (Inc.) 

Socledad Industrial la Euskalduna. 

The Mayaguez Light & Ice Co 

Arkadia Sugar Co 

Seller Sugar Co 

Benltes Sugar Co 

Companla Azucarera El Ejemplo 

Cayey Sugar Co 

Scoville&Co. (Inc.) 

Hacienda Semil (Inc.) , 

The A. A. David (Ltd j 

The Porto Rico Fruit Exchange 

S. Ramirez & Co 

The Porto Rico Drug Co 

Pellejas Sugar & Coffee Co 

Mayaguez Dock & Shipping Co 

Camuy Sugar Co 

Central Vannlna 

Central Allanza 

Utnado Sugar Co 



San Juan 

do 

San German . 

San Juan 

Ponce 

Arecibo 

San Juan 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Rio Piedras . . 



San Juan 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Mayaguez 

Play a de 
Ponce. 

San Juan 

do 

do 

Toa Baja 

Mayaguez 

San Juan 

do 

do 

Santa Isabel... 

San Juan 

do 

Mayaguez 

San Juan 

Lares 

Vieques 

Humacao 

San Juan 

-...do 

Juana Diaz 

Catano 

San Juan 

....do 

Ponce 

....do 

Mayaguez 

Camuy 

San Juan 

Arecibo 

Utuado 



Banking. 

Do. 

Do. 
General merchandise. 
Agricultural products. 
Sugar. 

Do. 
Fruits. 

Do. 
Sugar. 

Pineapples, etc. 
Fruits. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Docks and wharves. 
Sugar. 

Agricultural products. 
Apartment houses. 
Sugar. 
Lighterage, etc. 

Fruits. 

Do. 
Sugar. 

Grapefruit, etc. 
Sugar. 
Machinery. 
Construction work. 
Cigars, tobacco, etc. 
Sugar. 

Agricultural products. 
Foodstuffs. 

Electric power and ice. 
Sugar. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Agricultural products. 

Do. 
Transportation, warehonsinr, etc. 
Fruits. 

Commission merchants. 
Drugs. 

Sugar and coffee. 
General shipping. 
Sugar. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



96 



REPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Statement No. 6. — List of domestic corporations in legal existence on June 30, 1920 — 

Continued. 



Name. 



Location of 

principal place 

of basiness. 



Principal purposes. 



The Imperial Fruit Co 

The Times Publishing Co 

Porto Rico Browing Co 

Porto Rico Progress Publishing Co 

Sociedad Industrial La Union 

Asociaclon Constructora del Edificio Casino de 

Puerto Rico. 

Plata Sugar Co 

The Woodsum Fruit Co , . . . 

Compania Curtidora de Puerto Rico 

Ponce Mineral Water Co 

Casino de Puerto Rico 

Porto Rico Distilling Co 

Porto Rico Railway, Light & Power Co 

Porto Rico Construction Co 

Compania Azucarera del Toa 

Atlas Line 

Bavamon Fruit Growers' Association of Porto 

Ilico. 

Carmen Centrale , 

Compania Azucarera de la Carolina 

Jayuya Development Co 

Finlay, Waymouth & Lee (Inc.) 

Sociedad Aftistico Teatral 

Varmina Distilling Co 

The Mavaguez Drug Co 

The Porto Rico Mines Co 

Central Juanita (Inc.) 

The Parkhurst Pruit Co 

Jovero Land Co 

The Pr'escott & Mehrhof Co 

The Ponce Auto Transportation Co 

Insular Cigar Co 

Gonzalez Padin Co. (Inc.) 

Suburban Improvement Co 

La Plata Tobacco Co 

Garage Mavaguez (Inc.) 

Mayaguez Tramway Co 



Porto Rico Transportation Co 

Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico 

The Porto Rico Coconut Fiber Co 

C. O. Lord&Co 

Bayamon Fruit Co 

Ana Maria Sugar Co. (Inc.) 

Rico Tropical Fruit Co 

Abqv Vidal y Compania (Inc.) 

La Cfompania de ^ uerza Hidroelectrica de Ponce 

Porto Rico b ertilizer Co 

Miramar Shop Co 

The Atlas Conunercial Co 

New Corsica Centrale Corporation 

The Mansfield Plantations 

Compania de Luz y Fuerza Electrica de Lares. . . 

Caribbean Canning Co 

Julio Godreau Co 

Comerio Tobacco Co 

Asociacion Mercantil de Puerto Rico y Agencia 
Protectora de Creditos. 

La Correspondencia de Puerto Rico 

The Newton Fruit Co 

Central Pasto Viejo (Inc.) 

Sociedad Cooperativa de Premios (Inc.) 

Seboruco Grove 

Cayey Light & Ice Co 

Porto Rico Ice Co 

San Juan Racing <& Sporting Club 

A. Escudero & Co. (Inc.) 

La Buenaventura Fruit Corporation 

Cash Sales Co 

Oarzot y Fuertes , 

Compafiia Tabacalera del Comercio 

Central Bayaney 

Lee Vidal & Bolivar (Inc.) 

8 peclalty Shop for Automobiles , 

Perfumeria Barnes 



Bayamon. 
Sari Juan. . 

do 

do 

do 

do 



do 

Arccibo- .. 
San Juan.. 

Ponce 

San Juan. . 
Arecibo... 
San Juan.. 

do 

do 

do 

Toa Baja. . 



San Juan.. 

do 

Ponce 

San Juan. . 

-...do 

..-.do 

Mayaguez . 
San Juan. . 
Bayamon . 

do 

Ponce 

SalinEis 

Ponce 

Caguas 

San Juan.. 

.-..do 

Caguas 

Mayaguez. 
do 



San Juan.. 

-...do 

.-..do 

-...do 

Toa Baja. . 
Mayaguez. 
Arecibo... 
San Juan. . 

Ponce 

San Juan. . 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Arecibo. .. 

Lares 

Mayaguez. 

Salmas 

Comerio. . . 
San Juan.. 

....do 

.do 

.do 



.do.. 



Santurco. . 

Cayey 

San Juan. . 
do 



.do.. 



do 

Aguadilla. 
Naguabo. . 
San Juan.. 
Arecibo... 
San Juan.. 

.-..do 

Ponce 



Tropical Film Co 

Sachs, BarlettaA Bas (Inc.) 

Oorporacion Azucarera Sauri & Sublro.. 



San Juan. - 

..-.do 

Ponce 



Fruits. • 

Newspaper and general publishing. 

Brewing and distilling. 

Publishers. 

Foodstuffs. 

Construction and lease of building for 

Casino of Porto Rico. 
Sugar. 
Fruits. 
Leather. 

Aerated water, etc. 
Club. 
Distilling. 

Electric light and transportation. 
General construction. 
Sugar. 

Automobile transportation. 
Fruits. 

Sugar. 
Do. 

Sugar and coffee. 

General merchants. 

Theatrical organizations. 

Distilling. 

Drugs. 

Mining. 

Sugar. 

Fruits. 

Agricultural products. 

Agriculture and cattle. 

Automobiles and auto transportation. 

Tobacco. • 

General merchandise. 

Building construction. 

Tobacco. 

Transportation. 

Electric light, power, and transporta- 
tion. 

Automobile transportation. 

Banking. 

Fiber products. 

Machinery, hardware, etc. 

Fruit growing. 

Sugar. 

Fruit growing. 

Lumber. 

Electric power. 

Fertilizer. 

Automobile transportation, repair, etc. 

Automobile transport. 

Sugar. 

Fruit growing. 

Electric plant. 

Manufacture of fruit products. 

Agricultural. 

Tobacco. 

To furnish confidential information to 
act as collectors, etc. 

Printing. 

Mercantile and fruit. 

Sugar. 

To buy and sell trading stamps. 

Agricultural and mercantile. 

Electric light and ice. 

Ice. 

Horse racing. 

Mercantile. 

Fruit. 

Importers and exporters. 

Sugar. 

Tobacco. 

Sugar. 

Carpenter's shop and cabinet makers. 

Automobiles and transportation. 

Manufacture of alcohol, perfumes, and 
drugs. 

Motion pictures. 

Mercantile. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



97 



Statement No. 6. — List of domestic corporations in legal existence on June SOy 1920 — 

Continued. 



Name. 



Location of 

principal place 

of business. 



Principal pnf poses. 



Espinosa Villa Grove Corporation , 

Linea Ferrea del Oeste (Inc.) , 

Banco de Ponce 

Carlos Cid y Compania (Inc.) 

Porto Rico Fruit Union 

Central Belvedere 

Stubbe Bros. (Inc.) 

Korber & Co. (Inc.) 

Estate of Wilhelm Korber (Inc.) : 

Banco de San German 

Regional Printing Co 

Aibonito Electric Co 

Puerto Rico Ilustrado (Inc.) 

Occidental Medicine Co 

American Products Sales Agency 

Nicolas Hernandez Co 

South Porto Rico Sugar Co 

Knickerbocker Fruit Co 

West Porto Rico Sugar Co. (Inc.) 

Compafiia de Construcciones Populares por 
Ahorro, Ciudad del Sol, Sistema Roveda (Inc.). 

Standard Grocery Co 

The Porto Rican-American Preserving Co. (Inc.). 
Porto Rico Cocoanut Oil Mill Co. (Inc.) 



Dorado 

San Juan. . . 

Ponce 

San Juan. . . 

do 

Cabo Rojo.. 
San Juan... 



.do.. 



.do-, 
San German . 

San Juan 

Aibonito 

San Juan 

Arecibo 

San Juan 

do 

Ensenada 

San Juan 

do 

do 



...do.. 
...do.. 
...do.. 



Wm. }IL Garic& Co. (Inc.) 

Compania de Ferrocarriles del Norte de Puerto 

Rico (Northern Porto Rico R. R. Co.). 

La Isabeia Grove Co 

Sundial Film Co. (Inc.) 

Lee & 'O'Neill (Inc.) 

Garage Lareno (Inc.) 

Cantero Fernandez & Co. (Inc.) 

The Guaynabo Molasses Co. (Inc.) 

The P. L. Cormier Co 

Porto Rico Steam Laundry Co 

Fruit Growers' Association of Porto Rico (Inc.). 

Sociedad Progreso y Economia 

Compafiia Industrial y Agricola del Fraile 

Sucesores del Cine Campoamor, Corporacion 

Guayamosa. 

Monte Cristy Rice Co 

Banco Masonico de Puerto Rico 

The France & New York Medicine Co 

The Legrand Laboratories Corporation 

Compafiia Popular de Transporte 

The Puerto Rico Importing Co 

Compan ia Mercantil Arroyana 

Porto Rico Soap Co 

H. Glyde Gregory (Inc.) 



.do., 
.do.. 



dp 

do 

....do 

Lares 

San Juan. . 
do 



do 

do 

do 

Yabucoa . . 
Humacao . 
Guayama, 

San Juan. . 

do 

Ponce 

San Juan. . 
Bayamon . 
Ponce 



Arroyo 

San Juan. . 
do 



Porto Rico Iron Works (Inc.) 

Corporacion Constructora del Liceo Poncefio 

Nathaniel Charles Coan (Inc.) , 

Central Aguirre Sugar Co 

Boston Plantations Co 

La Democracia (Inc.) , 

Fruit Products Corporation , 

The Star Drug Co. (Inc.) , 

Sanchez Morales & Co.(Iiic.) , 

La Industrial Algodonera 

The Sugar Sales Corporation of Porto Rico 

Wander & Co. (Inc.) 

La Plata Mining Co 

Caribbean Soap Co. (Inc.) 

The Fajardo Sugar Co. of Porto Rico 

Sociedad Industrial La Constancia , 

Asociacion Constructora del Edificio Casino de 

Mayaguez. 
Arecibo Dock & Shipping Co 



Ponce. . 
....do.. 



San Juan.. 

Salinas 

San Juan.. 

do 

do 



.do.. 



.do... 

do... 

....do... 

.do... 



Ponce. . 
Guayama . 
Fajardo... 
Ponce 



Caribbean Publishing Co 

Porto Rican American Tobacco Co. of Porto 

Rico. 
German Diaz & Hno. (Inc.) .* 



Arecibo. 



San Juan.. 
....do.... 



Fruit. 

Transportation. 

Banking. 

Mercantile. 

Fruit. 

Sugar. 

Mercantile. 

Do. 

Do. 
Banking. 
Printing. 

Generation of electric power. 
Printing. 

Druggists' business. 
Mercantile. 

Do. 
Sugar. 
Fruit. 
Sugar. 
Building. 



Groceries. 
Fruit preserving. 
Coconut oil and 

products. 
Mercantile. 
Railroads. 



other coconut 



Agriculture. 

Moving pictures. 

Mercantile. 

Automobiles and transportation. 

Printing. 

Molasses sugar sirups, and sugar. 

Mercantile. 

Laundry business. 

Marketing and selling fruits. 

Merchandise and provisions. 

Agriculture and manufacture of starch. 

Moving pictures. 

Rice and other agricultural products. 

Banking. 

Drugs and chemicals. 

Do. 
Transportation. 
Importation and polishing of precious 

stones. 
Mercantile and agricultural. 



Buying and selling machinery and 

supplies. 
Casting and machinery. 
Construction and lease of buildings for 

LiceoPoncefio. 
Mercantile. 
Sugar. 
Agriculture. 

Publishing, printing, and stationery. 
Fruit juices and other fruit products. 
Drugs and chemicals. 
Mercantile. 
Knit cotton goods. 
Mercantile and agricultural. 
Mercantile. 
Mining. 



.do. 



Sugar. 

Soup pastes and confections. 

Construction and lease of building for 

Casino de Mayaguez. 
Transportation and docks, wharves, 

Publishing, printing, and stationery. 
Manufacturing tobacco. 

Printing and stationery. 



98 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Statement No. 6. — List of domestic corporations in legal existence on June 30, 1920 — 

Continued. 



Name. 


Location of 

principal place 

of business. 


Principal purposes. 


Llado Cigars (Inc.) 


San Juan 

. . .do 


Growing and manufacturing tobacco. 


Compania Editorial Puertorriquena. 


Publishing, printing, and stationery. 


Samana Industrial Co. (Inc.) 


Mayaguez 

San Juan 

do 


Sawing and planing wood. 
Banking and trust business. 
Publishing and printing. 


The Trust Co. of Porto Rico .... 


Compania Editora de Justicia 


Compania Industrial Occidental 


San German.. 

San Juan 

Arroyo 

Mayaguez 

Anasco 

San Juan 

... .do 


Electric power for lighting and other 


Compania Editora El Ideal (Inc.) 


purposes. 
Publishing, printing, and stationery. 


Porto Rico Cine Corporation 


Moving pictures. 

Publishing, printing, and stationery 


The Mayaguez Publishing Co 


Compania Cafetera y Comercial de Anasco (de 

cosecheros y comerciantes unidos). 
The International Express & Foundry Co. (Inc.) . 
Santurce Commercial Corporation . 


Buying and selling coffee and provi- 
sions. 
Transportation and foundry business. 
Mercantile. 


The Porto Rico Coal Co 

Carolina Tobacco Co. (Inc.) 


do 

Carolina 

Mayaguez 

Vlllalba 

San Juan 

Yabucoa 

San Juan 

do 


Coal.^ 

Growing and manufacturing tobacco. 


The Mavaguez Show Co 


Moving pictures. 


Central Juliana (Inc.) 


Sugar. 


El Banco de San Juan , 


Banking. 


Banco de Yabucoa 


Do. 


The Porto Rico Commercial Corporation 

Central Los Canos 


Motor vehicles and mercantile busi- 
ness. 
Sugar. 


The Thomsen-Besosa Development Co. (Inc.). . . 
Tio & Compania (Inc.) 


do 

San German. . 

Arecibo 

Guayama 

San Juan 

, do 


Development of processes for manu- 
facturing cements, etc. 
Buving and selling sugar cane. 


La Aldea Agricultural Corporation 


Sugar. ♦ 
Publishing, printing, and stationery. 
Manufacturing cements, etc. 
Clay products. 


La Nueva Libertad (Inc.) 


Porto Rico Portland Cement Co.. 


Porto Rico Clay Products Co 


The Northern Chemical Co. (Inc.).. . . 


... .do 


Drugs and chemicals. m 


Teatro Oriente de Humacao (Inc.) 


Humacao 

San Juan 

do 


Theatrical business. 


The Union Commercial Corporation 


Tealers in automobiles and accessories. 


West India Salt & Chemical Co 


Salt and other chemicals. 


American Commercial Co 


do 


Mercantile. 


Antilles Trading Co 


... do 


Do. 


Porto Rico Motion Picture Productions (Inc.)... 
Teatro Lares 


do 

Lares 


Motion picture productions. 
Theatrical business. 


The Ro^'ita Agricultural Co 


San Juan 

do 


Fruits. 


A. Erie Sumersille & Co. (Inc.) 


Mercantile. 


La Constructora del Hogar, Asociacion Coopera- 
tiva de Construcciones, de Ahorros y Presta- 
mos. 

Serra Hermanos 


do 

Bayamon 

Adjimtas 

San Juan 

Yauco 

San Juan 

San Sebastian. 

San Juan 

do 


Cooperative building, saving, and loan- 
ing. 

Drugs and chemicals. 


Corporacion Central de Luz y Fuerza Electrica, 

Adjuntas, P. R. 
Porto Rico Food Products Corporation 


Electric lighting and power. 
Food products. 


Yauco Moving Picture Co 


Dealers in and exhibitors of motion 


Puerta de Tierra Development Co 


pictures. 
Real estate development. 
Transportation and business incidental 

thereto. 
Real estate broker . 


San Sebastian Transportation & Business Cor- 
poration. 
Pasquara & Pesquera (Inc.) 


The Texas Co., Porto Rico (Inc.) 


Dealers in petroleum and petroleum 

products. 
Banking. 


Banco Agricola de Aguadilla 


Aguadilla 

Ponce. 


Ponce Electric Co 


Electric street railways. 

Dealers in automobiles and accessories. 


The Borinquen Trading Corporation 


San Juan 

do 

Mayaguez 

San Juan 

do 


The Porto Kico Auto Supplies Co. (Inc.) 

Porto Rico Bay Rum Co. (Inc.) 


Do. 
Manufacturing bay rum. 
Holding fairs. 


The Porto Rico Development Co. (Inc.) 


Leon Israel & Bros., Porto Rico (Inc.) 


Mercantile. 


Plaza Fruit Co. of Porto Rico 


Bayamon 

San Juan 

do 


Fruits. 


Elton Warner Co 


Bees and their products. 
Insurance. 


Porto Rican & American Insurance Co 


J. Riera & Co. (Inc.) 


Ponc6. .... 


Mercantile. 


The Cayey Industrial Corporation 


Cayey 


Bakers. 


Compania General de Cines y Espectaculos 

The Central Machete Co 


San Juan 

Guayama — •. 
Ponce 


Dealers in motion pictures and the- 
atrical business. 
Sugar. 


Credito y Ahorro Ponceno 


Banking. 


J. M. Blanco (Inc.) 


San Juan 

do 


Drugs and chemicals. 


Madera, Garcia, Tobacco Co 


Dealers in tobacco. 


Trajillo Alto Marble Co. (Inc.) 


.. ..do 


Quarrving marble. 


Lippitt & Mehrhof (Inc.) 


do 


Establishing and conducting hospitals 
Drugs and chemicals. 


Farmacla Keyty (Inc.) 


Guayama 

San Juan 

do 


F. U. Wells&Co. (Inc.) 


Mercantile. 


Import, Sales & Business Agency (Inc.). 


Do. 


The Porto Rico Trading & Commission Co. (Inc.). 


do 


Do. 



BEPOBT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECBETARY. 



99 



Statement No. 6. — List of domestic corporations in legal existence on June SOy 1920- 

Continued. 



Name. 



Location of 

principal place 

of business. 



Principal purposes. 



Borinquen Film & Moving Picture Co. 
Borinquen Novelty Co 



Ponce 

San Juan.. 



Colonos de Corsica (Inc.) 

Santiago A. Panzardi (Inc.) 

Calvin Detrick (Inc.) 

The Porto Rico Nursery Corporation 

Central Defensa (Inc.) 

Portorican Lloyds 

asanovas & Co. Succs 

Porto Rico Publishing & Printing Co. (Inc.) 

The Pharmaceutical Co. of Porto Rico (Inc.) 

Tipografia Nacional (Inc.) 

Teatro de Caguas (Inc.) 

Farmacia Nazario (Inc.) 

Goethals, Wilford & Boyd (Inc.), of Porto Rico. 

The San Juan Ginnery Co. (Inc.) 



Rincon 

San Juan... 

....do 

....do 

Caguas 

San Juan.. 
Mayaguez., 
San Juan-. 

do 

Ponce , 

Caguas 

Mayaguez. . 
San Juan.. 



.do. 



The Porto Rico Electroplating Co. (Inc.) 

The Tropical Fruit Juice Co. (Inc.) 

Rossy & Co. (Inc.) 

West Indies Trade Co. (Inc.) 

J. P. Bouret (Inc.) 

Costa & Santini Realty Co 

Santini Fertilizer Co 



....do. 
.do. 



Mayaguez. 
San Juan.. 

do 

do 

do 



J. J. Font & Co. (Inc.) 

Aguas Buenas Cine (Inc. ) 

The Mayaguez Box & Furniture Co. 



....do 

Aguas Buenas. 
Mayaguez 



Dealers in and exhibitors of motion 
pictures. 

Manufacturers of embroidered novel 
ties and dress goods. 

Sugar. 

Dealers in automobiles and accessories. 

Mercantile, 

Operating gardens and plant nurseries. 

Sugar. 

Insurance. 

Dealers in coffee. 

Publishing and printing. 

Drugs and chemicals. 

Publishing and printing. 

Theatrical business. 

Drugs and chemicals. 

Mercantile and ship suppliers and 
agents. 

Dealers in and manufacturers of cotton 
and cotton goods. 

Electroplating. 

Manufacturing of fruit juices. 

Manufacturers of soaps. 

Mercantile. 

Jewelers. 

Builders and leasers of a fertilizer plant. 

Manufacturers of and dealers in ferti- 
lizers. 

Drugs and chemicals. 

Exhibitors of motion pictures. 

Manufacturers of boxes and furniture. 



Statement No. 7. — List of foreign corporations appearing in the registers of the office of 
the executive secretary of Porto Rico as in business in Porto Rico on June 30y 1920. 



Name. 



Place where 
organized. 



Principal pur- 



Name of a^ent in 
Porto Rico. 



Address of. 



British & Foreign Marine 
Insurance Co. (Ltd.). 

New York Life Insurance 
Co. 

North British & Mercantile 
Insurance Co. 

Northern Assurance Co. 
(Ltd.). 

Norwich Union Fire In- 
surance Society (Ltd.). 

Royal Insurance Co. (Ltd.) . 

Swift&C^ 



England . . . 
New York . 



Insurance . 
do.... 



lEngland. 
Scotland. 

England. 

do... 

Illinois... 



.do. 
.do. 



American Colonial Bank of 
Porto Rico. 

New Yorg & Porto Rico 
Steamship Co. 

Manufacturers' Life Insur- 
ance Co. 

Sun Life Assurance Co. of 
Canada. 

Palatine Insurance Co. 
(Ltd.). 

Commercial Union Assur- 
ance Co. (Ltd.). 

Porto Rico Fruit Co 

Compania de los Ferrocar- 
riles de Puerto Rico. 

Ponce Ry. & Light Co 



Fidelity & Deposit Co. of 

Maryland. 
American Railroad Co. of 

Porto Rico. 
West India Oil Co 



.do. 



New York.. 
do 

Canada 

do 

England 

do 

New York.. 
Spain 



New Jersey. 
Maryland... 
New York.. 
New Jersey. 



do 

Foodstuffs and 

provisions. 
Banking 

Transportation 

In«!urance 

do 

do 



.do. 



Fruits 

Transportation 

Electric light and 

transportation. 

Surety bonds 



Transportation 

Oil 



Villar & Co., succes- 
sor. 
Antonio Sarmiento 

fSobrinos de Ezquiaga. 

\Moral& Co 

J. Ochoa y Hermano. . 



.do. 



Sobrinos de Ezquiaga. 
Wm. Walsh 



H. L. Cochran... 

R. 4. Nadal 

Eliseo Font jr.. 
Jesus M. Lago... 
P. Gandia & Co. 



Finlay, Waymouth & 

Lee (Inc.). 
Arthur B.Mitchell..., 
E. Acuna Aybar 



Gerard A. de Haseth. . , 
Herman L. Cochran.. . 
G.Villard 

E. Hernandez Acosta. . 



San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 
Mayaguez. 
San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Dn. 

Bayamon. 
San Juan. 

Ponce, 

San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 



100 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Statement No. 7. — List of foreign corporations appearing in the registers of the office oj 
the executive secretary of Porto Rico, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



Place where 
organized. 



Principal pur- 
poses. 



Name of agent in 
Porto Rico. 



Address of. 



Guardian Assurance Co. 

(Ltd.). 
Porto Rican Leaf Tobacco 

Co. 

Singer Sewing Machine Co. 

Central Los C^nos 

Liverpool & London & 
Globe Insurance Co. 

British-American Assur- 
ance Co. 

The Union Central Life 
Insurance Co. 

The Candelaria Fruit Co. . . . 

The Puerto Rico Planters' 
Co. 

American Surety Co. of 
New York. 

Waldrop Photographic Co . . 



Espinosa Fruit Co 

Ponce & Guayama R. R. 
Co. 

Mona Island Phosphate Co. 

The Fajardo Development 
Co. 

Porto Rico Orange & Cot- 
ton Co. 

Herkimer-Porto Rico Land 
& Fruit Co. 

The Western Assurance Co. 

Porto Rico Grove & Gar- 
den Co. 

The West Indian Cigar Co. , 

Societe Anonyme des Su- 
creries de St. Jean. 

San Antonio Docking Co... 



Porto Rican Express Co 

United States Colonial 
Fruit Co. 

Bemal Estate 

San Antonio Co 



The Barcelone'ta Fruit Co. . . 
Tropical Fruit Growers' 

Association. 
The Royal Bank of Canada. 



Pavenstedt Land Co 

National Surety Co 

Hatillo Fruit do 

The Gregg Co. (Ltd.) 

Employers' Liability As- 
surance Corporation 

(Ltd.). 
The Standard Fruit Co. of 

Porto Rico. 
Baloise Fire Insurance Co. . 

American Cigar Co 

Plaza Provision Co 

Empire Pineapple Co 

The Filbrick Fruit Co. of 

Porto Rico. 
The Superior Fruit Co. of 

Porto Rico. 
The C!olumbo Tropical 

Fruit Co. 
L'Unlon Compagnie d'As- 

surance contra I'lncendie. 

The Oneida Fruit Co 

Armour <fe Co 



The Laguna Fruit Co. of 

Porto Rico. 
Fortuna Estates 



England 

New Jersey. . 



do 

New York... 
England 



Canada. 
Ohio.... 



Insurance 

Growing and man- 
ufacturing to- 
bacco. 
Sewing machines . , 

Sugar , 

Insurance , 



Villar & Co., successor. 
A. Staebler , 



Jose Alvarez 

R. B. Childs.... 
J. Ochoa y Hno . 



.do. 
.do. 



Sobrinos de Ezquiaga. 
Jose C. Barbosa 



Maine. . 
....do. 



New York... 
Tennessee 



Massachusetts. 
New Jersey. . . 

Louisiana 

Connecticut... 

New York 

.....do 



Canada 

New York... 



..-.do... 
Belgium . 



New York... 



...do. 
...do. 



New Jersey. . 
Maine 



New York.. 
New Jersey. 

Canada 



New York 

....do 

Pennsylvania. 

New York 

Great Britain. 



New York 

Switzerland... 
New Jersey. . 

New York 

....do , 

...-do 



....do.. 
....do.. 
France. 



Fruits 

Agricultural prod- 
ucts. 
Surety bonds 



N. A. Walcott. 
Michael Davis. . 



Photographic sup- 
plies, etc. 

Fruits 

Transportation. . . 



MiningjCtc.. 

Operation of 
roads. 

Agricultural prod- 
ucts. 

....do 



Joaquin M. Torres. . 
N.P.Nichols 



C. B. Emerson.. 
C. L. Carpenter. 



rail- 



Marc Leieune . 
J. Bird Arias. . 



Insurance 

Agricultural prod- 
ucts. 

Cigars, etc 

Sugar 



E. A. Gildemester 

Mrs. Charles P. Avery. 

f Sobrinos de Ezquiaga 
and R. R. Kauff- 
man. 
F.N. Reed 



Docks, wharves, 

etc. 
Express service. .. 
Fruits 



Manual Bao 

Prudent Wittemans. . 



R. A. Nadal. 



Land development, 
Docks and 

wharves. 
Fruits 

do 



Banking. 



Wm. J. Salva. 
E. A. Bailey.. 



F. Manuel Toro. 
R. A. Nadal.... 



E. M. Ferringer. 
Jesse Kroon 



Land development 
Surety bonds, etc. 

Fruits 

Machinery 

Insurance 



W. H. Biscombe and 

Eduardo Bazan. 
Rajnnond B. Childs.. 

Harry F. Besosa 

Walter C. Dreier 

Rafael Carrion 

Charles Hartzell 



Fruits 

Insurance . . 
Cigars, etc.. 
Groceries... 
Pineapples. 
do 

Fruits 



.do. 



Insurance . 



Michael Davis 

Sobrinos de Ezquiaga. 

A. Staebler 

Frederick C. Holmes.. 

M. Labeur 

A. F. Thyboe 



C. F. Juengling. . 

....do 

Charles Vere 



New York. .. 
New Jersey- . 

New York... 

....do 



Fruits 

Foodstuffs and 

provisions. 
Fruits 



Land development, 



Wm. A. Griffith . 
L. McLean 



John M. Kohn.. 
F. Manuel Toro. 



San Juan. 
Do. 



Do. 
Arecibo. 
San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Vega Baja. 

San Juan. 

Do. 

Catano. 
Aguirre. 

Mayaguez. 
Fajardo. 

Bayamon. 

Guaynabo. 

(San Juan. 
Aguadilla. 
Pueblo Viejo. 

Utuado. 
Caguas. 

San Juan. 

Do. 
Manati. 

Ponce. 
San Juan. 

Barceloneta. 
Garrochales. 

San Juan. 

Arecibo. 
San Juan. 
Rio Piedras. 
San Juan. 
Do. 



Vega Baja. 

San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 
Bayamon. 

Do. 

Vega Baja. 

Do. 

San Juan. 

Manati. 
San Juan. 

Bayamon. 

Ponce. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECB6TARY. 



101 



Statement No. 7. — List of foreign corporations appearing in the registers of the office of 
the executive secretary of Porto Rico, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



Place where 
organized. 



Principal pur- 
poses. 



Name of agent in 
Porto Rico. 



Address of. 



Fitzpatri(?k Wenar Fruit 

& Land Co. of Porto Rico. 

Porto Rico Mercantile Co.. 

Montreal Trust Co 



Plaza Fruit Co. 



Hope Fruit Co 

The Bayview Fruxt Co. of 

Porto Rico. 

Pomelo Fruit Co 

El Prospero Fruit Co. of 

Porto Rico. 
Phoenix Assurance Co,. 

(Ltd.). 
Toa Alto Citrus Fruit Co . . . 
Bank of Nova Scotia 



Lomsiana 

West Virginia 
Canada 



Illinois/. . 



Land development 

Molasses 

Banking 



Rhode Island 
New York 



Fruits.. 
....do.. 
....do.. 



Morovis Plantation 

The Royal Exchange As- 
surance. 

The Fajardo Sugar Grow- 
ers' Association. 

The Yorkshire Insurance 
Co. (Ltd.). 

Dibert, Bancroft & Ross 
Co. (Ltd.\ 

The Texas Co :... 

San Juan Fruit Co 

Blue and Gold Orchards... 

Atlas Transfer Co 



The Palo Seco Fruit Co. . . . 
The Porto Rico Citrus 

Fruit Co. 

Arecibo Grape Fruit Co 

Island Fruit Co , 

The Star Fruit Co. of Porto 

Rico. 
Porto Rico Gas Co , 



The Southern Cross Fruit 

Co. (Inc.). 
The Royal Fruit Co. of 

Porto Rico (Inc.). 
Compagnie Francaise des 

Cables Telegraphiques. 
Boston Molasses Co : . . . 



Spanish American Fruit Co. 
Vega Valley Orchards (Inc.) 
The B. F. Goodrich Rub- 
ber Co. 

City of Ponce Gas Co 

Porto Rico Telephone Co. 
Utica Plantations (Inc.). . . 

Bull Insular Line (Inc.).. 



The Roval Fruit Co. of 

Ucica/N. Y. 
Rosenstadt & Waller (Inc.). 
^George P. Plant Milling Co. 
Minute Tapioca Co 



The National Cash Regis- 
ter Co. 
Hartlord Fire Insurance Co. 

Atlas Grape Fruit Co 

Parker, Webb & Co 



Sugar Products Co 

Medal Film Co. (Inc.). 



Universal Film Manufac- 
turing Co. 
Nitrate Agencies Co 



.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 
.do.. 



Great Britain. 

New York 

Canada , 

New York 

Great Britain 

New York 

Great Britain 

Louisiana 



Texas 

New York. 

Maine 

do 



Insurance. 



Fruits 

Banking. 



Agricultural prod- 
ucts. 
Insurance 



Sugar 

Insurance.. 
Machinery. 



Oil 

Fruits., 
.do.. 



Massachusetta. 
New York.... 



do 



Automobile trans- 
portation. 

Fruits 

....do 



.do.. 



do 

Delaware 

New York 

do 

France 

New Jersey.., 

do 

Rhode Island. 
Michigan , 



Delaware... 

do 

New York. . 



.do., 
.do., 
.do.. 



Manufacture and 

sale of gas. 
Fruits , 



.do.. 



Maine 

New York 



Submarine cables. 

Dealers in mo- 
lasses. 

Fruits 

do 

Dealers in rubber 
goods. 

Gasworks 

Telephones 

Fruits, vegetables, 
etc. 

Carriage of freight 
and passengers. 

Fruits 



.--.do 

Missouri 

Massachusetts. 

Ohio 



Connecticut.. 

Delaware 

Michigan 



New York... 
..-.do 



....do 

WesitVirgima, 



Tobacco 

Sale of wheat flour. 

Sale of tapioca 
and gelatin. 

Sale of cash reg- 
isters. 

Insurance 

Fruits 

Meats and meat 
products. 

Sugar products 

Moving picture 
filmS/ 

do 



Import and export 



Fred R.Clarke 

A. Rauschenplat , 

W. R. McKinlay and 

W. H. Biscombe. 

Geo. L. Elkins 

BeriahA. Wall , 

John M. Kohn 

D. Soldini , 

John McLaughlin 

Finlay, Waymouth & 
Lee (Inc.). 

Maurice Labeur 

Edward Smith Craw- 
fond. 

John McLaughlin 

J. Ochoay Hno 

J. Bird Arias 

Successprs de Fron- 

tera S. en C. 
Sobrinos de Ezquiaga. 

Frank Lopez 

Geo. K. Knight 

C. E. Woodsum 

Delfin Munoz 

B. E. Stevenson 

JohnM. Kohn 

G. W. Middieton 

G. C. Swanson 

John M. Kohn 

George H.Joy 

R.L.Mills 

John M. Kohn 

E. Ferrer 

Pedro Salazar 

A. W. Houck 

Timothv B. Souther.. 
Julian (3. Elizondo 

F. Manuel Toro 

Edward Ferrer 

Edward B. Roberts... 

Miguel Such 

Arthur B.MitchelL... 

Antonio C. Rodriguez. 
M. Gomez & Co 

G. Henry Cross.. 

J. Figueroa Disdier 

Sobrinos de Ezquiaga. 

Hebert W. Brown 

Manuel Gomez Lopez. 

Sobrinos de Ezquiaga. 
Carlos Zeno 

P.M.Gonzalez 

A.C. Diehl 



Bayamon. 

San Juan. 
Do. 

Bayamon. 
San Juan. 
Bayamon. 

Do. 
Vega Baja. 

San Juan. 

Bayamon. 
San Juan. 

Vega Baja. 

San Juan. 

Fajardo. 

Mayaguez. 

San Juan. 

Do. 

Do. 
Vega Alta. 
San Juan. 

Do. 
Bayamon. 

Manati. 

Barceloneta. 

Bayamon. 

San Juan. 

Monacilla, Rio 

Piedras. 
Bayamon. 

San Juan. 

Do. 

Vega Baja. 
Vega Alta. 
San Juan. 

Ponce. 
San Juan. 
Bayamon. 

San Juan. 

Bayamon. 

Caguas. 
San Juan. 
Bayamon. 

San Juan. 

Do. 
Bayamon. 
San Juan. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



102 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Statement No. 7. — List of foreign corporations appearing in the registers of the office of 
the executive secretary of Porto Rico^ etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



Place where 
organized. 



Principal pur- 
poses. 



Name of agent in 
Porto Rico. 



Address of 



Melchior, Armstrong & 

Dessau (Inc.). 
Buena Vista Industrial Co. . 

The Behn Brothers rinc.)., 
Ebrey Chemical Works. . . , 

St. Paul Fire & Marine 

Insurance Co. 
South Porto Rico Sugar Co 
The Porto Rico Hotels 

Corporation. 
Mona Island Guano Co. 

(Inc.). 
The Home Insurance Co... 
The Cornucopia Mining Co. 
Union Hispano Americana 

de Seguros. 
The National City Bank 

of New York. 
Armour Fertilizer Works. . . 
Caribbean Film Co 



New York. 
Delaware... 



Connecticut., 
New York... 



Minnesota.. 



New Jersey. 
Delaware 



New York.. 



....do 

Delaware. 
Cuba 



New York.. 

New Jersey. 
Cuba 



B. A. Cheney & Co. (Inc.). . 

The Grolier Society of 
London. 

Selection Film Service 
(Inc.). 

Great American Insurance 
Co. 

Insurance Co. of North 
America. 

J. Cohn&Co. (Inc.) 

The Reliance Marine In- 
surance Co. (Ltd.). 

International Planters Cor- 
poration. 

Porto Rico Sales Corpora- 
tion. 
Niagara Fire Insurance Co. . 



Max Gans & Son (Inc.). 



Virginia 

New York 

....do 

....do 

Pennsylvania. 

New York 

England 



New Vork 

Massachusetts. 
New York 

....do 



The London Assurance.. 



American Sumatra 
bacco Co. 



To- 



England. 
Georgia.. 



Durlach Bros. (Inc.) 

Pan-American Life Insur- 
ance Co. 
E. Heller & Bro. (Inc.).... 

Blue and Gold Orchards 

(Inc.). 
Weil & Weil (Inc.) 



Delaware.. 
Louisiana - 



New York 

Rhode Island. 
New York 



Mercantile 

Agricultural and 
mercantile. 

Mercantile 

Drugs and chem- 
icals. 

Insurance 

Sugar 

Hotels 

Fertilizers 

Insurance 

Mining 

Insurance 

Banking 

Fertilizers 

Motion picture 

films. 
Importing and 

exporting. 
Bookselling and 

publishing. 
Motion picture 

films. 
Insurance 

Fire, marine, and 

inland insurance. 

Tobacco packers.. 

Marine insurance. . 

Exporters and im- 
porters of leaf 
tobacco. 

Dealers in sugar... 

Fire, marine, and 
automobile in- 
surance. 

Growers of and 
dealers in to- 
bacco. 

Insurance in all 
branches. 

Growers of and 
dealers in to- 
bacco. 

Dealers in tobacco . 

Life insurance 

Manufacturers of 

handkerchiefs. 
Fruits 

Makers of hand 
embroidery. 



P. Juan Armstrong... 

Edwin A. Thayer 

Edward Ferrer , 

Francisco I. Carreras.. 

Korber & Co. (Inc.).. 

F. Manuel Toro 

Edward Ferrer 

Marc Lejeune 

Korber & Co. (Inc.).. 

J. R. F. Savage 

Edward Ferrer 

Burt O.Clark 

L. McLean 

J. P. Donohue 

B. A. Cheney 

M. W.Purvis 

P. Amado Rivera 

C. R. Hartzell , 

Korber & Co. (Inc.). 

Luislturrino 

Villar & Co., successor. 

H. B. Hodgetts 

Charles L. Carpenter.. 

Villar & Co., succes- 
sor. 

Frank Becerra 

Sobrinos de Ezquierdo 

&Co. 
Victor K. Ettlinger... 

Milton I. Durlach 

Cliffords. Foy 

Alfred F. Rubel 

Timothy Souther 

Helen W. Courtois 



Ponce. 

Vega Baja. 

San Juan. 
Humacao. 

San Juan. 

Ponce. 
San Juan. 

Mayaguez. 

San Juan. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

, Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Caguas. 
San Juan. 

Do. 

Aguirre. 
San Juan. 

Caguas. 

San Juan. 
Do. 

Caguas. 
San Juan. 

Rio Piedras. 

Vega Alta. 

San Juan. 



BEPOBT OF THE EXBOUTTVE SECRETARY. 



lOS 



Statement No. 8. — Domestic associations not for pecuniary profit registered in the office 
of the executive secretary during the fiscal year 1919-20. 



Name. 


Location. 


Principal purposes. 


"Logia Buenas Costumbres" No. 20 


Cayev 


Fraternal. 


Sociedad Constructora del Templo Catolico 

de Rio Piedras. 
Porto Kican Leaf Tobacco Merchants' Asso- 


Rio Piedras 

San Juan 


Building a Catholic church in Rio 

Piedras. 
Protection of interests of leaf tobacco 


ciation ... 


.. .do 


merchants of Porto Rico. 


Sociedad Protectora de la Juventud . 


Granting scholarships to poor young 


Association de Profesores Rurales de Puerto 

Rico. 
Fratemidad Puertorriquena 


Rio Grande 

Aguadilla 


men, strengthening their characters, 

and starting them in life. 
Advancement of interests of rural 

teachers. 
Mutual aid. 


Logia Luz de Borinquen No. 7990 G. 0. U. 

de O. F. in America. 
The Porto Rican Benevolent Society 


Ponce 


Fraternal. 


do 


To help deserving poor people and 


Associacion de Escritores y Artistas de 

Puerto Rico. 
Casino "Luz del Porvenir'' 


San Juan 


work for the suppression of pauper- 
ism. 
Encouragement and development of 


Quebradillas 

ToaAlta 


native art and literature. 
Social. 


Logia Luz del Toa, numero 68.. . 


Fraternal. 


Liga Agricola de Ponce 


Ponce 


Advancement of agriculture. 


Llga Agricola de Utuado . 


Utuado 


Do. 


Asociacion General de Oficinistas de Co- 


San Juan 


To work for a fair remuneration of 


mercio de Puerto Rico. 
Liga Agricola de Yauco 


Yauco 


members as employees. 
Advancement of agriculture. 


Liga Agricola de Aguadilla . 


Aguadilla 


Do. 


Casino de Guayama 


Guayama 


Social. 


Liga Agricola de Comerio 


Comerio 


Advancement of agriculture. 


Union de Panaderos 


Coamo 


Advancement of interests of bakers. 


Padres Agustinos de Puerto Rico 


San German 

Mayaguez . 


Religious. 


Liga Agricola de Mayaguez . 


Advancement of agriculture. 


Liga Agricola de Arecibo 


Arecibo 


Do. 


Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados . 


San Juan 


The care of the aged poor. 


Sociedad '*E1 Fenix" 


Juana Diaz 

Vega Baja 


Social. 


Liga Agricola de Vega Baja ... 


Advancement of agriculture. 


Liga Agricola de Coamo 


Coamo 


Do. 


Asociacion Catolica de Auxilio Mutuo de 

Quebradillas. 
Liga Agricola de Caguas 


Quebradillas 

Caguas 


Mutual aid. 

Advancement of Agriculture. 


Asociacion de Cirujanos Menoses de Puerto 


San Juan 


Mutual protection of its members, 


Rico. 
Liga Agricola de Guayanilla... . 


Guayanilla 

Maricao 


minor surgeons. 
Advancement of agriculture. 


Liga Agricola de Maricao 


Do. 


Liga Agricola de San Lorenzo 


San Lorenzo 

Aguas Buenas 

Humacao 


Do. 


Liga Agricola de Aguas Buenas 


Do. 


Union Local de Panaderos, Confiteros y 


Advancement of interests of bakers. 


Auxiliares de la Ciudad de Humacao, 

Puerto Rico. 
Asociacion Benefica de Asistencia Hospita- 

laria y de Ensenanza Glinica. 
Sociedad Beneficia Union del Gremio de 


• 

San Juan 


Maintenance of a hospital and a school 


Ponce 


therein for the training of nurses. 
Mutual aid. 


Cocheros. 
Liga Agricola de Ciales . 


Ciales 


Advancement of Agriculture. 


Logia Fratemidad Oddfelica 9858 G. 0. U. 


Manati 


Fraternal. 


de 0. F. 







Statement No. 9. 



-Domestic associations not for pecuniary profit dissolved during the 
fiscal year 1919-20. 



Name. 



Location. 



Asociacion de Dependientes del Comercio de Puerto Rico 

Logia Patria 

Colegio Arecibeno de Ninas 

Liga Progresista del Orocovis 

Asociacion de Agricultores de Canas de la Region Oriental de Puerto Rico 

Sociedad Constructora del Templo Catolico de Rio Piedras 

Fratemidad Puertorriquena 



San Juan. 

Do. 
Arecibo. 
Barros. 
Humacao. 
Rio Piedras. 
Aguadilla. 



104 REPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Statement No. 10. — List of domestic associations in legal existence on June SO, 1990. 



Name. 



Location. 



Principal purposes. 



San Juan Tennis Club 

The Democratic Party 

Sovereign Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted 

Masons of Porto Rico 

El Bello Ideal 

Asociacion de Senoras Damas del Santo 

Asilo de Ponce 

Liga do Propietarios de Fincas Urbanas de 
San Juan. 

Sociedad de Ingenieros de Puerto Rico 

Centro de Instruccion y Recreo de Barran- 
quitas. 

Luz y Progreso 

Esperanza de San Juan Lodge, 8715, G. O. 

U. O. F. in America. 
Asociacion de Profesionales de Puerto Rico.. 

El Ancora 

Asociacion de Abogados de Puerto Rico 

Asociacion de Chauffeurs de Puerto Rico. . . 

National Coffee Growers' Association 

Casino de Rio Piedras 

The Saddle and Motor Country Club 

Centro de Detallistas de Provisiones de 
Puerto Rico. 

Logia Palafox No. 174 

Logia Pi y Margall No. 282 

Umon Espaiiola 

Union Local de Trabaj adores de Defensa y 
Beneficencia. 

Logia Obreros Unidos No. 281 , 

Centro Espafiol de Yauco 

Logia Fratemidad Espaiiola No. 110 

Logia Porvenir de Puerto Rico No. 302 

Asociacion de Maestros de Puerto Rico 

Liga de RepubUcanos Espafloles de Puerto 

Rico. 
Asociacion de Agricultores de Rio Grande, 

Loiza, y Carolina. 

Liceo Ponceiio 

La Hermandad 

Logia Hijos de Minerva No. 60 

Asociacion Civica Puertorriquefia 

Asociacion Dental de Puerto Rico 

Union Club 

Club Bayamones 

Lodge " Estrella de Oriente" No. 30 

Centro de Instruccion y Recreo de Juncos . . . 
Asociacion de Dependientes de Mayaguez . . . 

Centro Espafiol de Lares 

Sociedad Centro Camuyano 

Asociacion de Agricultores de Rio Piedras, 

Caguas, Guaynabo y Trujillo Alto. 

Ponce Democratic Club 

Asociacion de Trabaj adores Unidos de 

Puerto Rico. 

Gremio del Trabajo 

Logia Adelphia 

Biblioteca Publica de Catano 

Asilo de Huerfanas de Ponce 

Hijas de la Caridad de San Vicente de Paul 

de Puerto Rico. 

Casino San Rafael 

ElZenit 

Federacion de los Espiritistas de Puerto Rico 
The Young Men's Christian Association of 

San Juan. 

Liga Antituberculosa de Ponce 

Logia Faro de la Marina No. 8680 (G. O. U. 

de O. F.). 

Aguadilla Progresista 

Siervas de Maria de Puerto Rico 

Liga Progresista de Coamo, P. R 

Asociacion de Abogados de Mayaguez (Bar 

Association of Mayaguez). 
Los Quinientos (Liga de Ciudadanos Pro- 

gresistas). 
Sociedad Circulo de Braceros de Guayama, 

P. R. 
Casa de Espafia en Puerto Rico 



Asociacion Medlca de Puerto Rico., 
American Pioneers of '98 



San Juan., 
do.... 



do... 

Santurce. 



Ponce 

San Juan., 



do 

Barranquitas.. 



Santurce . . 
San Juan. 



....do 

Ponce 

San Juan 

.-..do 

Ponce 

Rio Piedras . 
Bayamon . . . 
San Juan 



....do 

.--.do 

Mayaguez 

San German. 



Arecibo... 

Yauco 

Ponce 

Mayaguez . 
San Juan.. 
....do.... 



Loiza . 



Ponce 

San German . 

Vega Alta 

San Juan 

do 

do 

Bayamon 

Humacao 

Juncos 

Mayaguez 

Lares ^l . 

Camuy 

Rio Piedras . . 



Ponce 

San Juan.. 

Guayama . 
Mayaguez. 

Catafto 

Ponce 

San Juan.. 



Quebradillas . 

San Juan 

....do 

....do 



Ponce 

Ponce Playa. 

Aguadilla 

San Juan 

Coamo 

Mayaguez 



....do.... 
Guayama. 
San Juan.. 



.do. 
.do. 



Athletic entertainment. 
Political. 

Fraternal. 

Instruction and amusement. 

Charitable. 
Property owners. 

Professional. 
Social. 

Instruction and amusement. 
Fraternal. 

Professional. 

Beneficial. 

Professional. 

Do. 
Coffee industry. 
Social. 

Do. 
Mutual protection and social. 

Fraternal. 

Do. 
Social. 
Fraternal. 

Do. 
Social. 
Fraternal. 

Do. 
Relations between teachers. 
Political. 

Agricultural. 

Educational. 

Charitable. 

Fraternal. 

Civic. 

Professional. 

Social. 

Do. 
Fraternal. 
Social. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Agricultural. 

Political. 
Labor. 

Beneficial. 
Fraternal. 
Educational. 

Charitable and educational. 
Do. 

Social. 
Beneficial. 

Spiritualist doctrines. 
Social. 

Charitable. 
Fraternal. 

Development of Aguadilla. 
Charitable. 

Development of Coamo. 
Professional. 

Development of Mayaguez. 

Recreative and educational. 

Union, fraternity, and instruction of its 

members. 
Professional. 
Social and fraternal. 



EEPOET OF THE EXECUTIVE SECKETAEY. 



105 



Statement No. 10. — List of domestic associations in legal existence on June 30, 1920- 

Continued . 



Name. 



Location. 



Principal purposes. 



Porto Rico Board of Fire Underwriters. 



Colegio Puertorriquefio de Ninas 

€irculo Union .'. 

Liga Antituberculosa de Puerto Rico.. 



Asociacion de Periodistas 

€lub Deportive de Ponce 

€lub Nautico San Juan (Inc.) 

<jrran Lofjia de Distrito No. 41 de la Gran 

Orden Unida de Odd Fellows, en America. 

Asociacion Protectora de Hogar 

Union de Mapinos No. 598. 

Asociacion de Maestros Plomeros de Puerto 

Rico. 
The Porto Rico Mission Conference of the 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Quaerens 

Centrode Instruccion y Recreo de Gurabo... 

Liga Anti-Alcoholica de Puerto Rico 

Casino Espanol de Rio Piedras , 

Legia Caballeros de la Noche , 

Ladies' Aid Church Society 

Logia Union y Amparo No. 44 

Asociacion Profesional y Automovilista de 

Puerto Rico. 

Centro Adjunteiio 

El Amparo 

El Faro 

Casino de Lares 

Porto Rico Fruit Growers' and Shippers' 

League. 

Sociedad Espiritista Regeneracion Moral 

Iglesia Evangelica Puertorriqueiia 

Asociacion de Colonos del Distrito Norte 

Sociedad de Escogedores de Puerto Rico 

Institute of Mission Helpers of Porto Rico... 
Association of Registered Nurses of Porto 

Rico. 
Congregacion de la Mision de San Vicente de 

Paul. 
Asociacion de Abogados de Guayama (Bar 

Association of Guayama). 
Logia No. 9560 de la Gran Orden Unida de 

Odd Fellows de America. 

Hijos de Porvenir 

Christian Science Society of San Juan, Porto 

Rico. 
Asilo de Ancianos y Ninos Desamparados, 

de Yauco. 
Logia " Eslabon de Borinquen" No. 9752, de 

la Gran Orden Unida de Odd Fellows en 

America. 

La Buena Fe 

Respetable Logia Acacia No. 66 

The Redemptorist Fathers of Porto Rico 

Sociedad Puertorriqueiia de Derecho Inter- 

nacional. 

Partido Cuetistas Utuadefios 

The Western Porto Rico Rebuilding Asso- 
ciation. 

Asociacion de Agricultores de Canas de 
Azucar de Juncos, Gurabo y Las Piedras. 

Logia "Fidelidad," Gran Orden Unida de 
Odd Fellows en America. 

Congregacion de las Madres de Sagrado 
Corazon de Jesus, en Puerto Rico. 

Union Cooperativa de Prensistas 



Orquesta Juventud 

Casino de Arecibo 

Sociedad Protectora de Desamparados 

" Logia Buenas Costumbres" No. 20 

Porto Rican Leaf Tobacco Merchants' Asso- 
ciation. 
Sociedad Protectora de la Juventud 



San Juan. 



do.... 

Cayey 

San Juan.. 



do.... 

Ponce 

San Juan.. 
Yauco 



Mayaguez. 
Arecibo... 
San Juan.. 



.do. 



Ponce 

Gurabo 

San Juan 

Rio Piedras. 

Juncos 

Bayamon . . . 

Caguas 

San Juan 



Adjuntas.. 
Mayaguez. 

do 

Lares 

San Juan.. 



Caguas 

Ponce 

Arecibo . . . 
San Juan. . 
Santurce . . 
San Juan. . 



....do.... 
Guayama . 
Bayamon . 



Aguadilla. 
San Juan. . 



Yauco.. 
Catafio. 



....do 

Barceloneta . 
Mayaguez... 
San Juan 



Utuado . . . 
Mayaguez. 



Juncos 

Lajas 

San Juan. . 
....do.... 



Mayaguez. 
Arecibo . . . 
Caguas — 

Cayey 

San Juan. . 



.do. 



Union of representatives in Porto Rico 
of fire insurance companies. 

Educational. 

Recreative and educational. 

Establishment and maintenance of 
hospitals for the treatment of tuber 
culosis. 

To help journalists. 

Sports. 

Nautical sports. 

Fraternal. 

Mutual aid. 

Do. 
Protection among plumbers. 

Religious. 

Spiritualistic. 

Recreative and educational. 

To combat alcoholism. 

Social. 

Fraternal. 

Religious. 

Fraternal. 

Mutual aid among chauffeurs. 

Social. 
Mutual benefit. 

Do. 
Social. 
Protection of interests of fruit growers 

and shippers of Porto Rico. 
Spiritualism. 
Religious. 

Protection of sugar-cane growers. 
Protection of cigar assorters. 
Religious, educational, and charitable. 
Advancement of profession of nursing 

and defense of its interests. 
Religious and educational. 

Protection of lawyers and advance- 
ment of profession. 
Fraternal. 

Mutual benefit. 
Religious. 

Charitable. 

Fraternal. 



Mutual benefit. 

Fraternal. 

Religious and educational. 

Promotion of study of international 

law. 
Political. 
Solicitation of donations for rebuilding 

towns in Porto Rico which suffered 

most from earthquakes in 1918. 
Adva'ncement of interests of members 

in their relations with outsiders. 
Fraternal. ^ 

Religious and educational. 

Defense of its members and betterment 

of the printer's art. 
Musical. 
Social. 
Charitable. 
Fraternal. 
Protection of interests of leaf-tobacco 

merchants of Porto Rico. 
Granting scholarships to poor young 

men, strengthening their characters , 

and starting them in life. 



106 



REPORT OF THE GOVERISTOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Statement No. 10. — List of domestic associations in legal existence on June 30, 1920 — 

Continued. 



Name. 


Location. 


Principal purposes. 


Logia Luz de Borinquen No. 7990 G. 0. U. 

de 0. F. en America. 
The Porto Rican Benevolent Society 


Ponce 


Fraternal 


.... do 


To help deserving i)oor people and 
work for the suppression of pauper- 
ism. 

Encouragement and development of 
native art and literature. 

Social. 


Asociacion de Escritores y Artistas de 

Puerto Rico. 
Casino " Luz de Porvenir" 


San Juan 


Quebradillas 

Rio Grande 

Toa Alta 


Asociacion de Profesores Rurales de Puerto 

Rico. 
Logia Luz de Toa, No. 68 


Advancement of interests of rural 

teachers. 
Fraternal. 


Liga Agricola de U tuado 


Utuado 


Advancement of agriculture. 
Do. 


Liga Agricola de Ponce 


Ponce 


Asociacion General de Oflcinistas del Comer- 


San Juan 


To work for a fair remuneration of 


cio de Puerto Rico. 
Liga Agricola de Yauco 


Yauco 


members as employees. 
Advancement of agriculture. 
Do 


Liga Agricola de Aguadilla 


Aguadilla 


Casino de Guayama 


Guayama 


Social. 


Liga Agricola de Comerio 


Comerio 


Advancement of agriculture. 


Union de Panaderos 


Coamo 


Advancement of interests of bakers. 


Padres Agustinos de Puerto Rico 


San German 

May ague z 


Religious. 

Advancement of agriculture. 
Do. 


Lisa Acricola de Mavacruez .... 


Liga Agricola de Arecibo 


Arecibo 


Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados. 


San Juan 


The care of the aged poor. 


Sociedad "El Fenix" " 


Juana Diaz 

Vega Baja 


Social. 


Liga Agricola de Vega Baja 


Advancement of agriculture. 


Liga Agricola de Coamo 


Coamo 


Do. 


Asociacion Catolica de Auxilio Mutuo de 

Quebradillas. 
Liga Agricola de Caguas 


Quebradillas 

Caguas 


Mutual aid. 

Advancement of agriculture. 


Asociacion de Ciruianos Menores de Puerto 


San Juan 


Mutual protection of its members, 


Rico. 
Liga Agricola de Guayanilla 


Guayanilla 

Maricao 


minor surgeons. 
Advancement of agriculture. 


Liga Agricola de Maricao 


Do. 


Liga Agricola de San Lorenzo 


San Lorenzo 

Aguas Buenas 

Humacao 


Do. 


Liga Agricola de Aguas Buenas . 


Do 


Union Local de Panaderos, Confiteros y 

Auxiliares de la Ciudad de Humacao, P. R. 

Asociacion Beneflca de Asistencia Hospitala- 


Advancement of interests of bakers. 


San Juan 


Maintenance of a hospital and a school 


ria y de Ensenanza Clinica. 
Socieaad Benefica Union del Gremio de 


Ponce 


therein for the training of nurses. 
Mutual aid. 


Cocheros. 
Liga Agricola de Ciales . .' 


Ciales 


Advancement of agriculture. 
Fraternal. 


Logia Fraternidad Oddfelica 9858 G. 0. U. 
de 0. F. 


Manati 







Statement No. 11. — List of associations organized outside of Porto Rico existing and 
doing business on June SO, 1920, 



Name. 



Place where 
organized. 



Principal 
purpose. 



Name of agent in 
Porto Rico. 



Address of 
the agent. 



The Domestic and Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the United States of 
America. 

The Christian Woman's Board of Mis- 
sions. 

The Woman's Home Missionary So- 
ciety of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

The Female Academy of the Sacred 
Heart. 

General Conference Corporation of 
Seventh Day Adventists. 

Board of Missions for Porto Rico and 
Latin America of the General Council 
of the Evangelical Lutheran Church 
in North America. 



New York Religious, 



Indiana do 



Ohio. 



New York 

District of 

Coliunbia. 
Pennsylvania . 



.do. 



Educational.. 

Rehgious 

Mission work. 



Chas. B. Colmore. 



M. B. Wood- 



Mrs. James 
Murray. 

Guadalupe 

Bofarull. 
Wm. Steele.. 



C. 



de 



Alfred Ostrom 



San Juan. 



Bayamon. 
San Juan.5 



Santurce. 

Do. B^ 
San Juan. 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTTVE SECBBTABT. 



107 





Statement No. 12. — List of foreign consuls. 




Country. 


Name. 


Rank. 


Residence 


Argentine Republic 

Belgium 


Sergio Ramirez 


Vice consul 


San Juan. 


Ch. Renoz 


Consul general 

Consul 


Habana, Cuba. 




J. E. Saldana 


San Juan. 


Do 


A . Brav 


Vice consul 


Mavaguez. 


Do 


J. Lacot 


do 


Ponce. 


Brazil 


Waldemar E. Lee 


. do 


San Juan. 


Do 


Albert Edward Lee 


Commercial agent 

Consul 


Do. 


Colombia 


Fabriciaco Velez Posada 


Do. 


Do.. 


Manuel R. Morales 


do 


Ponce. 


Costa Rica 


Nicolas Megwinoff 


do 


San Juan. 


Cuba 


Gustavo Marin y de Herrera. . 


... do 


Do. 


Do 


Jose Caminero Shelton 


do 


Ponce. 


Do 


Francisco Porto y Castillo 


do 


Mayaguez. 
Arecibo. 


Do 


Fernando Aleman y Vallee 

Ernesto H. Lienau y Lange 


Honorary consul 

do 


Do 


Aguadilla. 
Do. 


Do 


Carlos iBauza y Ruiz de Apocada. . 

T. G. I. Waymouth 

Pedro Juan Armstrong 


Vice consul 


Denmark 


Consul 


San Juan. 


Do 


Vice consul 


Ponce. 


Do 


Alberto Bravo 


do 


Mayaguez. 
Humacao. 


♦ Do. . 


Anionio Roig 


. do .. 


Dominican Republic. . . 


Socrates Nolasco 


Consul general 

Consul 


San Juan. 


Do 


Ramon Almonte . 


Ponce. 


Do . 


Marino Cestero Castro 


do . 


Mayaguez. 
Do. 


Do 


Enrique Rousset 


Honorary consul 

Vice consul 


Do 


Eduardo Fronteras 


Aguadilla. 
Humacao. 


Do 


Jose Janer 


do 


Do 


BlasC. Silva 


do 


Ponce. 


Do- 


Fernando \leman 


Honorary vice consul . 
do 


Arecibo. 


Do 


J. C. Creanor 


Guanica. 


Do 


Fernando Figueredo. . 


.. do 


San Juan. 


France. 


Ives Louis Napoleon du Courthial. 
Pierre Paul Biaggi 


Vice consul . 


Do. 


Do 


Consular agent 

do 


Ponce. 


Do 


Ch. Le Brun. 


Vieques. 
Arecibo. 


Do. 


Eugenio Elie I^efranc l . 


do 


JDo 


Dr. xYndre Orsini . . . 


. .. do 


Mayaguez. 
Humacao. 


Do. . . 


P. Sandos 


do . . .. 


Germany i 








Great Britain 


Edward Mervvn de Garston 

Arthur H. Noble 


Consul 


San Juan. 


Do 


Acting consul 


Do. 


Do 


Thomas Boo thby, jr 


Vice consul 


Mayaguez. 


Do 


William Henry Augustus Denton, 
Henry Alexander McCormick 


. do 


Arecibo. 


Do 


do 


Arroyo-Guayama. 
Humacao. 


Do 


Antonio Roig 


... do 


Do 


Fernando Miguel Toro 


do . . .. 


Ponce. 


Guatemala 


Carlos Vere 


Consul 


San Juan. 


Haiti 


do 


do 


Do. 


Do 


Bias C. Silva 


Vice consul 


Ponce. 


Honduras 


Waldemar E. Lee 


Consul ad honorem — 
Consul 


San Juan. 


Italy 


Ciro Malatrassi 


Do. 


Do 


G. P. deRinaldis 


Consular agent 

. do 


Ponce. 


Do 


Giacomo Antonio Caino 


Mayaguez. 
New York. 


Japan 


Chonosuke Yada 


Consul general 

In charge of consulate. 
Consul 


Mexico 


LuiS Cuevas Zequeira 


San Juan. 


Netherlands 


Albert E. Lee 


Do. 


Do 


Jacobo Bravo 


Vice consul 


Mayaguez. 
Ponce. 


Do 


Ernesto Moringlane. 


do 


Norway 


Waldemar E. Lee 


Consul 


San Juan. 


Do 


William Henry Biscombe 


In charge of vice con- 
sulate. 
Consul 


Ponce. 


Panama 


Charles Vere 


San Juan. 


Do 


MatiasVidal 


Honorary consul 

Consul . 


Ponce. 


Do 


Manuel de J Vidal 


Do. 


Paraguay 


Manuel Fernandez Juncos 


....do 


San Juan. 


Peru 


Benito Zalduondo 


do 


Do. 


Do 


Guillermo H Moscoso 


Honorary vice consul. 
Consul 


Mayaguez. 
San Juan. 


Portugal 


Jose Maria Lomba 


Cpaini 


Emilio de Motta y Ortiz 


do 


Do. 


Do 


Juan Vazquez y Lopez Amor 

Alberto Burkhart y Tejada 

Juan Casellas 


Honorary consul 

Honorary vice consul. 
do 


Mayaguez. 
Arecibo. 


Do 


Do 


AguadiUa. 
Mayaguez. 
Vieques. 
Ponce. 


Do 


Francisco Pelegri Roger 


.... do 


Do 


Avelino Portela Rolan 


do 


Do 


Florencio Suarez 


do 


f TTf den 


Johann Friedrich von Uffel 

Schomburg. 
Max Karl Wilhelm Heine 


Consul 


San Juan. 


Do 


Vice consul 


Ponce. 


Do 


Waldemar E. Lee 


In charge of consulate. 
Consul 


San Juan. 


Uruguay ; 


Manuel Mendia Morales 


Do. 


f)o.. 


Carlos Armstrong. - . . . 


Vice consul 


Ponce. 


Do 


Jacobo Bravo y Gonzalez 


do . - 


Mayaguez. 
San Juan. 


Do 


Manuel Gomez Lopez 


do 


Venezuela 


Lorenzo Gonzalez Pacheco 

Sebastian Bonet 


Consul 


Do. 


Do 


do 


Arecibo. 


Do 


Vicente Barletta 


Honorary consul 


Mayaguez. 



i RecOTds of former German consulate at San Juan and vice consulates at Arecibo, Aguadilla, and Ponc« 
taken tvcr by Spamsk consul and vice consuls, respectively. 



108 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Statement No l^.—List of notaries public registered in the office of the executive secretary 

of Porto Rico on June 30, 1920. 

[Barnes of nDtaries who registered during the fiscal year 1919-20 are followed by an asterisk (*).| 



Name. 



Abella Blanco, Luis 

Acevedo, Francisco 

Acosta, Mariano R 

Acosta Quintero, E 

Acuna Aybar, Eduardo 

Agosto Abadia, Adrian 

Agrait Aldea. Ricardo 

Alegria, Jose S 

Alemany Sosa , Juan 

AUonzo Bau'-a, Osvaldo 

Altiery , Genaro * 

Amadeo, Antonio 

Amado Rivera, Pedro 

Andino Espejo, Pablo 

Aponte, Jose J 

Aponte , Jose R * 

Aponte Ro Jrigue^;, Arturo 

Aponte Rodriguez, L 

Arce Rollet , Rafael 

Ardin , Gon.Talo 

Arjona Siaca, Rafael 

Arnaldo Sevilla, AKredo 

Arrillaga Urrutia, R 

Arroyo Rivera, Angel 

Barcelo, Antonio R 

Becerra Lacot , Luis A 

Benedicto Geigel, Jose ,- - 

Benitez, Celestino 

Benitez Flores, Manuel 

Bernardini de la Huerta, T 

Besosa, Harry F 

Blasco, Luis B 

Blondet, Ricardo H 

Brunet del Valle, Carlos 

Brusi Alvarez, Alberto 

Buitrago, Carlos B 

Calzada Fernandez, G 

Campillo, Enrique 

Canales Rivera, Nemesio 

Cancel, Rafael A.* 

Capo Cintren, Eduardo 

Capo Matres, Luis 

Carballeira Canellas, I 

Casalduc Goicoechea, F 

Casta Fomes, Geronimo 

Castillo Leon, Tomas 

Cervony Gely, Francisco 

Cintron LastVa, Rafael 

Coballes Gandia, Lorenzo 

Cobian Romeu, Rafael 

Coll y Cuchi, Cayetano 

Coll y Cuchi , Jose 

Colon, Cristino R 

Cordero Rodriguez, R 

Cordoves Arana, Rafael 

Crespo, jr. , Ulpiano 

Cruiado Silva, Gustavo * 

Diaz, Jose E 

Dia'. Viera, Enrique - 

Dominguez, Jorge V 

Dominguez Rubio, Celestino 

Dottin,E. H. F 

Esteves, Buenaventura* 

Fajardo Martinez, Pascasio 

Feliu, Leopold© 

Fernandez, Garcia B 

Fernandei , Jose I 

Figueroa, Manuel 

Fiol Negron, Angel 

Flores Colon, Eduardo 

Flores, Francisco R 

Font, Eugenlo 

Fores, Benito 

Francis. Hugh R 

Franco Soto, Carlos 

Gallardo Diaz, Fernando mn (fran 

Garcia de la NocedaC A^adilu 

Garcia Ducos, Alberto Aguaanii 

Garcia Ducos, Juan i ^"• 



Residence. 



San Juan 

Lares 

Aguadilla 

Ponce 

San Juan 

....do 

Arecibo 

Manati 

Mayaguez 

Utuado 

Mayaguez 

San Juan 

....do 

-.-.do 

Guayama 

Arecibo 

Humacao 

Yabucoa 

Caguas 

San Juan 

Ponce 

Mayaguez 

Anasco 

San Juan 

Fajardo 

Ponce 

San Juan 

Humcao 

San Juan 

Guayama 

San Juan 

Aguadilla 

RioPiedras--.- 

Juana Diaz 

Camuy 

Caguas 

Fajardo 

San Juan 

Ponce 

Ciales 

San Juan 

Guayama 

San Juan 

Ponce 

Anasco 

Ponce 

Guavama 

do 

Hatillo 

Bayamon 

San Juan 

do 

JuanaDiaz 

Barros 

San Juan 

Arecibo 

San Juan 

do 

RioPiedras — 

San Juan 

Guayama 

San Juan 

San Sebastian - 

Mayaguez 

do 

Cayey 

Ponce 

Arecibo 

Ponce 

do 

Utuado 

San Juan 

San German.. 

San Juan 

Aguadilla 

Humacao 

Rio Grande... 



Date of regis- 
tration. 



Dec. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Apr, 

Mar. 

Apr. 

May 

Jan, 

Jan. 

Nov. 

May 

June 

Jan. 

Mar. 

July 

May 

Nov. 

Feb, 

July 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Mar. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

July 

Feb. 

Mar, 

Sept. 

June 

June 

Apr. 

May 

Julv 

Dec. 

June 

May 

Jan. 

Mar. 

May 

Mar. 

June 

Feb, 

Apr. 

Mar. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

June 

May 

May 

July 

Mar. 

Dec. 

May 

Oct. 

May 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Dec. 

Mar. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Apr. 

May 

Mar. 

July 

Mar. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Apr. 

Mar. 

July 

Aug. 

Mar. 

May 

Sept. 

Dec. 

Dec. 



20,1905 
2,1914 
6,1906 
7, 1903 
25, 1902 
22, 1910 
20, 1909 

13. 1913 
22,1918 
17,1903 
17,1920 
27,1910 
26, 1909 
12,1919 
16,1918 
24,1920 
13,1908 

1,1906 

7,1902 

20, 1919 

3,1917 

25. 1912 
22,1916 
21,1918 
16,1916 
24,1902 

4,1903 
5, 1913 
3, 1912 
3,1901 

24. 1914 
26, 1919 
13,1919 

16. 1913 
5,1903 

27,1911 
29, 1902 
24,1913 
11,1908 
24,1920 
31,1911 
24,1910 
1.1912 
13,1901 

10. 1914 
2,1907 

10,1910 

15. 1912 
24,1914 

1,1903 
18,1908 

8, 1912 
17,1917 

23. 1913 
29, 1919 
27, 1913 

1,1920 

7,1910 

5, 1919 
15, 1910 

8.1904 
26, 1913 
23,1920 
12,1915 

9,1910 
11,1910 
29,1904 
27.1907 

7,1918 
14,1913 
28,1919 
31,1919 
10, 1902 
21,1911 
11,1905 
29,1919 
. 25, 1915 

5, 1916 
17,1912 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



109 



Statement No. 13. — List of notaries public registered in the office of the executive secretary 
of Porto Rico on June 30, i 9:^0— Continued. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Date of regis- 
tration. 


Garcia Ducos, Sandalio 


Aguadilla 


Jan. 17,1918 


Garcia Mendez, Juan B 


do 


Dec. 19,1917 


Garcia Mujica, Ramon . . . 


Carolina 


Nov. 14,1917 


Garcia Veve, Adolfo 


Fajardo 


Jan. 8,1919 


Garcia Veve , Angel 


do 


Apr. 1,1902 


Garcia Yanguas , Aurelio 


San German 


Dec. 18,1917 


Geigel , Juan Eugenio . . 


Mayaguez 


Oct. 13,1904 


Geigel, Fernando J 


San Juan 


May 2, 1910 


Gimenez, Francisco 


Ponce '. / 


Apr. 12,1910 


Gimenez Garcia, Lorenzo 


Caguas 


July 11,1902 


Gomez, Jose I 


Arecibo 


Aug. 6, 1904 


Gonzalez Darder , Enrique . 


San Juan 


July 3,1906 


Gonzalez Fagundo, Francisco 


Humacao 


Jan. 10,1911 


Gonzalez, Pedro 


San Juan 


Jan. 27,1909 


Gonzalez Gonzalez, Julio C 


do 


Nov. 26,1902 


Gonzalez Lopez, Martin 


San Lorenzo 


Feb. 11,1901 


Gonzalez Mena, Enrique . 


Aguadilla 


June 19,1911 


Guerra, Benjamin 


San Juan 


July 29,1918 


Guerra, Gabriel 


do 


Feb. 9,1903 


Guerra, Miguel 


do 


May 23,1910 


Guevara Munoz, Jose 


San Sebastian 


May 8, 1917 


Guillermety, Rafael . . 


San Juan 


Feb. 20,1908 


Guzman Benitez Jose de 


.... do 


Sept. 10, 1914 
July 6, 1901 


Guzman Benitez, Juan de 


do 


Guzman, Miguel 


Salinas 


Feb. 3,1913 


Hernandez , Ignacio 


Rio Piedras 


Dec. 22,1916 


Hernandez Lopez, Juan 


San Juan 


Nov. 25,1902 


Hernandez Usera Jose 


....do 


June 12,1906 


Horton , Benjamin J 


Mayaguez 


Jan. 23,1913 


Huvke, Juan B 


Humacao 


June 30,1911 


Igaftua Aviles, Victor 


Quebradillas 


Dec. 28,1916 


Iriarte, jr., Celestino 


San Juan 


June 20,1911 


Janer Landron, TiUis- . . 


Mayaguez 


May 28,1919 


Jesus, Angel R. de 


San Juan 


May 13,1914 


Jimenez Rivera, F 


Arecibo 


Nov. 15,1913 


Jusino, Jose C * 


Bavamon 


May 7, 1920 


Lefebre, Enrique 


San Juan 


May 22,1913 


Leon Lugo, Sergio 


Juana Diaz 


Dec. 9, 1913 


I^eon, Rafael.. 


Ponce. . . . 


Jan. 19,1901 


Llorens Torres, Luis . 


San Juan 


Mar. 28,1918 


Lopez Acosta, EiLsebio 


San German 


May 29,1918 


Lopez Antongiorgi, Rafael 


Humacao 


Dec. 26,1918 


Lopez de Victoria, Gilberto 


Yauco 


Apr. 20,1918 


I^opez Gaztambide, Eugenio 


San Juan 


Sept. 18, 1903 


Lopez Tizol, Eduado.. . 


.....do 


Feb. 10,1914 


Marin Marien, Alberto 


do 


Feb. 11,1913 


Marin Marien, Eduardo.. . ... . . 


Utuado 


Do. 


Marquez Abrams, Lemuel 


Quebradillas 


Mar. 9, 1909 


Marquez Huertas, Enrique. . 


Bayamon 


Dec. 24,1908 


Martinez Alvarez, Rafael 


San Juan 


Nov. 4,1910 


Martinez Davila, Jose 


-.do . . 


Jan. 14,1909 


Martinez, Davila, Manuel A 


Guayama 


Jan. 10,1911 


Martinez, Fernando E 


San Lorenzo 


Mar. 6, 1914 


Martinez, Frank 


San Juan 


Dec. 29,1915 


Martinez, Jose C. .. . 


....do 


Jan. 10,1911 


Martinez Nadal, Rafael 


Ponce 


Jan. 14,1913 


Martinez Rivas, Carmelo 


....do 


Julv 30,1902 


Mas, Felix C 


Carolina 


Fe6. 7, 1913 


Mena La Torre, Andres . 


Caguas 


Feb. 20,1912 


Mendez Vaz, Luis 


Mavaguez 


June 6,1901 


Mendin Sabat, Luis 


Caguas 


Oct. 17,1911 


Mercader, Luis. . 


Aguadilla 


Oct. 17,1912 


Miranda, Herminio ... 


Arecibo 


Feb. 18,1913 


Molina. Henry G*... . 


San Juan 


July 9, 1919 


Monserrat Simo, Damian 


do 


Jan. 17,1902 


Monserrat Suro, Damian . . 


do 


June 19,1908 


Montalgo Guenard, Luis 


Mayaguez 


Sept. 16, 1916 


Morales Acosta. Ignacio. .. 


Bayamon 


May 18,1913 


Morales, Miguel Marcos . 


Cavey 


Jan. 27,1914 


Moscoso, Guillermo H 


Mayaguez 


Jan. 14,1913 


Munoz Morales, Luis . . . 


San Juan 


Mar. 17,1909 


Munoz Ramos, Rafael 


do 


June 28,1919 


Navarro Ortiz, Francisco.. 


Cayey 


Jan. 14,1913 


Nazario de Figueroa, Joaquin 


San German 


July 19,1901 


Nazario Lugo, Amadeo 


Yauco 


May 1, 1911 


Negron Benitez, Eduardo 


Rio Piedras 


June 16,1919 


Nogueras, Juan B 


Cayey 


Feb. 18,1918 


Oiler Diaz, Jose 


Bayamon 


June 29,190« 


Ortiz Alibran, J. J.* 


San Juan 


May 27,1920 


Otero Rivera, Francisco . . 


Mayaguez 


Jan. 7, 191t 


Padilla, Felix Luis 


Juana Diaz 


Feb 2, 1917 



14748—20- 



110 



REPOET OF THE GOVERNOR OE PORTO RICO. 



Statement No. 13. — List of notaries public registered in the office of the executive secretary 
of For to Rico on June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Date of regis- 
tration. 



Padro, Angel 

Palaeios y Rodriguez, R 

Palmer, Santiago B 

Parra, Francisco 

Pasarell y Rius, Augusto 

Pazy Ruis, Tomas 

Perello Quifiones, Luis 

Perez Almiroty, F. G.* 

Perez, Celestino J , 

Perez Mercado, Rafael B 

Peiia, Abraham 

Pinero Rodriguez, Antonio , 

Pinero Rodriguez, Fulgencio 

Polanco de Jesus, Valentin 

Ponsa Pares, Enrique 

Poventud, Alberto S 

Prado Morales, Francisco 

Quintana Cajas, Alfonso 

Quifiones y Quinones, Ramon. . 

Ramirez de Arellano, F 

Ramirez Santibafiez, Jose , 

Ramirez Vigo, RodoUo 

Ramos, JoseC 

Reichard del Valle, Arturo 

Reichard del Valle, Augusto 

Riera Palmer, Mariano 

Rincon, Enrique , 

Rivera, JoseC* 

Rivera, Manuel A , 

Rodriguez Alvario, Francisco*.. 

Rodriguez, Antonio 

Rodriguez, Artemio P 

Rodriguez Bermudez, Jose M . . . 

Rodriguez Cebollero, Jose C 

Rodriguez, Gustavo 

Rodriguez, Jose D 

Rodriguez, Juan Z 

Rodriguez Ortiz, V. F 

Rodriguez, Ramon P 

Rodriguez Flores, Ramon H 

Rodriguez Rivera, Vicente 

Rodriguez Serra, Manuel 

Roman Font^ Abelardo 

Rosario Gelpi, Jose * 

Rossy, Manuel F 

Roura, Dr. Ramon 

Ruiz de Val, Jose 

Rola, Carlos M 

Sabater, Jose 

Salicrup Colon, Manuel A 

Sanchez Vahamonde, Luis 

Sanchez Montalvo, Rafael 

Santana, jr., Pedro 

Santiago Carmona, Leopoldo 

Santoni, Felix 

Saniera Egozcue, Ramon * 

Seixy Rosali, James C 

Siaca,Jr., Ramon 

Siaca Pacheco, Ramon 

Sifre, Jaime 

Soldevila, Ismael 

Soto Gras, Francisco 

Soto, Juan B 

Soto Rivera. Jose 

Souffront. Echevarria, O 

Suau Car DonelH Salvador 

Suliveras Rivera, Antonio 

Timothee, PedroC 

Todd, RobertoH 

Tormes Garcia. Lepoldo 

Toro Colberg, Miguel del 

Toro Fernandez, C. del 

Toro, F. Manuel 

Toro Soler, Ricardo del 

Toro Vendrell, Rafael 

Torres Garrido, Francisco 

Torres, Carlos J.* 

Torres, Jose G 

Torres Monge, Sandalio 

Torres Perez, Tomas 

Torres Sallaberry, Jose Q 



Arecibo 

San Juan 

do 

Ponce , 

do , 

Rio Grande 

Humacao 

San Juan 

Comerio 

Ponce , 

San Juan 

Quebradillas . . , 

Juncos 

Manati 

San Juan , 

Ponce 

Manati , 

Coamo 

Mayaguez 

Sari Juan , 

do 

Mayaguez 

Guayama 

Aguadilla 

do 

Mayaguez 

San Juan , 

San Sebastian. , 

Coamo 

Juncos 

Guayama 

San Juan 

Arecibo 

Manati 

Ponce 

Lares 

Arecibo 

Cayey 

San Juan 

Rio Piedras 

Cayey 

San Juan 

San Sebastian. . 

Ponce 

San Juan 

Mayaguez 

Rio Piedras 

Fajardo 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Rio Grande 

do 

San Juan 

Comerio 

Arecibo 

San Juan 

Ponce 

San Juan 

do 

do 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

....do 

Rio Piedras 

Mayaguez 

San Juan 

Arecibo 

San Juan , 

do 

Ponce 

Cabo Rojo 

do 

Ponce 

Cabo Rojo 

Ponce 

San Juan 

....do 

do 

do 

Ponce 

Salinas 



Julv 
Oct. 
Mar. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
June 
Dec. 
June 
Apr. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Aug. 
Nov. 
July 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Apr. 
Julv 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
Apr. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
May 
June 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Nov. 
May 
Oct. 
Apr. 
May 
Apr. 
Oct. 
June 
Apr. 
June 
Nov. 
June 
July 
May 
Oct. 
Apr. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
June 
Apr. 
May 



27. 1904 
29, 1901 

4, 1901 
5,1901 
9,1906 
8, 1915 

21. 1918 
15, 1920 

22. 1909 
21, 1917 

1. 1917 
6, 1915 

25. 1912 

13. 1913 

16. 1911 
15, 1917 
29, 1901 

9, 1913 
4,1901 
27, 1908 

6. 1918 

17. 1903 
3,1908 

12. 1908 

18. 1910 
14, 1901 

14. 1912 

28. 1919 

20. 1905 
11,1919 

17. 1913 
13, 1910 

12. 1917 

13. 1910 
7, 1904 

23. 1913 
11,1901 

9,1908 

17. 1914 

29. 1916 
24,1913 

S; 1905 

12. 1918 
1, 1920 

17. 1909 
4,1901 

10. 1917 
11,1909 

24. 1911 
7,1903 

18. 1918 

28. 1904 

27. 1913 
13, 1908 

6,1904 

20. 1920 
25, 1908 

7. 1919 

26. 1914 

18. 1910 

28. 1919 
18, 1910 
28, 1910 

4, 1919 
13, 1918 

9,1906 
11, 1903 
25, 1913 
30, 1908 

5, 1913 

6, 1910 
27, 1910 

3, 1906 
22,1909 

1,1901 
16, 1916 

6, 1919 

26. 1905 

30. 1915 
23, 1918 

1.1013 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



Ill 



Statement No. 13. — List of notaries public registeredin the office of the executive secretary 
of Porto Rico on June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Date of regis- 
tration. 



Torres Sola, Heriberto. . 

Tons Soto, Jose 

Tous Soto, Manuel 

Travecier, Carlos 

Travieso Nieva, Martin. 
Tristany, jr., Enrique *. 
Trujillo Guil, Antonio. . 

Umitia, Carlos V 

Valdes Cajas, Ulpiano. . . 

Vargas, Jose A.* 

Vazquez, Angel A 

Vendrell, Joaquin 

Vergne Ortis, Taiis 

Villaronga Chariez, Luis 

Wood, O. M 

Yordan Davila, Luis 

Zavaleta, Miguel 

Zayas Pizarro, Vicente.. 
Zeno Sama, Gustavo 



Rio Piedras . . 

Ponce 

San Juan 

Humacao 

San Juan 

Juana Diaz.. 

San Juan 

Afiasco 

Humacao 

San German . 

Mayaguez 

Humacao 

San Juan 

Barranquitas 

San Juan 

Ponce 

Guayama 

Ponce 

Arecibo 



Dec. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
June 
Oct. 
Jan. 
May 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Oct. 



18, 1916 
4,1907 

11. 1909 

23. 1910 
6,1905 

19, 1920 
31,1912 

7, 1912 
24, 1903 
16, 1919 

4, 1910 
21, 1913 
12, 1919 
22, 1918 
17, 1910 
26, 1913 
11,1902 
12, 1912 

3, 1916 



Statement No. 15. — Office of the executive secretary — bureau of supplies, printing, and 
transportation balance sheet, June 30, 1920. 

ASSETS. 

Property: 

Printing division $52, 820. 41 

Transportation division. 15,243.91 
Furniture and fixtures... 4, 115. 12 
Equipment 707.11 



Fund: Treasurer of Porto 
Rico 

Merchandise (inventory): 

Materials and supplies. . . 31 , 804. 93 
Transportation division 
supplies 1, 415. 51 

Accounts receivable, controlling ac- 
count 

Suspense, accounts receivable 

Work in proi^ress, controlling account... 

Goods returned or lost 

Revised Statutes and Cedes of Porto 
Rico 

Unearned insurance premium 

Invoices registered during month 

United States Post Office Department 
(deposit for letter-box keys) 

Building 

Labor on departmental cars 



$73,186.55 
2,147.69 

33, 220. 44 

94,997.66 

3,334.73 

10,529.56 

673.31 

299.00 

542. 75 

21,469.29 

.60 

1,858.76 

22.50 



Investment $129, 

Appropriation 25, 



Loans: Interior advance. 

Audited vouchers and pay rolls 

Accounts payable: 

United States invoices. . $39, 018. 03 
Local invoices 237. 11 



35 



151.07 

000.00 

000.00 

51.92 



Collections refundable 

Suspense, accounts payable 

Amount in suspense, pending investi- 
gation 

Reserve for purchases and renewals: 

Printing division $10, 977. 80 

Transportation division . 2 , 1 1 1 . 32 

Adjustment account 



1,255.14 
288.96 
194.47 

249.19 



13,089.12 
2.97 



Total 242, 282. 84 



Total '. 242,282.84 

Statement No. 16. — Office of the executive secretary — Bureau of supplies, printing, and 
transportation supplementary statement, June 30, 1920. 

Purchases and Sales. 

ASSETS. 

Inventory;, June 30, 1919: 

Material and supplies $42, 793. 54 

Transportation division supplies 1, 080. 59 

Revised Statutes and Codes of Porto Rica 299. 00 

Work in progress 8, 427. 77 

$52,600.90 

Purchases, Sales Account. 

United States $339,465.69 

Freight, cartage, and insurance 30,412. 05 

$369,877.64 

Local 743,500.20 

Freight, cartage, and insurance 7,959. 33 

751,459.63 

$1,121,337.17 

Aut« hires 3,290.00 

Vet purchases 1,177,228.07 



112 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Deduct inventory, June 30, 1920: 

Materials and supplies $31,804. 93 

Transportation division supplies 1, 415. 51 

Revised Statutes and Codes of Porto Rica 299. 00 

Work in progress 10,529. 56 

$44,049.42 

1, 133, 178. 65 

Printing division output 77, 450. 01 

Less cost of stock 36, 669. 91 

40,780.10 

Transportation di\ision earnings 16, 015. 54 

Delivery service earnings 736. 81 

Labor not distributed 430. 80 

Government property sold 14. 00 

Bureau property sold 13. 90 

Additions to reserve for purchases and renewals: 

Printing division^ net credit for the year 2,921. 42 

Transportation division- 
Net credit for the year $3, 129. 95 

Less renewals 693. 30 

2,436.65 

5,358.07 

Adjustment account 2. 97 

1,196,530.84 

LIABIUTIES. 

Total sales for the year $1,183,355.53 

Less corrections and deductions 2, 115. 90 

Net sales for the year $1,181,239.63 

Supplies used by divisions as under — 

Transportation division 9, 579. 77 

Printing division administration 2, 176. 76 

Bureau office paid from contingent expenses 2, 366. 00 

Delivery service 219. 26 

14,341.79 

Unbilled items: 

Transportation division 376. 34 

Jobs 177, 204, and 2424 15. 46 

Labor on departmental cars 22. 50 

413. 30 

Claims— additions to goods returned or lost: 

Balance June 30, 1920 673. 31 

Balance June 30, 1919 139. 19 

536. 12 



1,196,530.84 
Printing Division. 

OUTPUT. 

Finished jobs during the year: 

Composing room $56, 259. 09 

Pressroom 8,399. 79 

Bindery room 12, 791. 13 



$77,450.01 



OPERATION. 

Materials and supplies: 

Composing room 34, 414. 14 

Bindery room 2, 255. 77 

Wages: 

Composing room 19, 881. 24 

Pressroom 7,064. 26 

Bindery room 9, 969. 28 

Insurance: 

Composing room 105. 49 

Pressroom 70. 39 

Bindery room 35. 00 

Repairs and maintenance: 

Composing room 113. 14 

Pressroom 121. 22 

Bindery room G3, 94 

Stationery and supplies: 

Composing room 250. 70 

Pressroom 307. 52 

Bindery room 249. 65 

Power and light: 

Composing room 549 72 

Pressroom 552. 52 

Bindery room lOo. 77 



36,669.91 



36,914.78 



210. 88 



298.30 



807.87 



1,203.01 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 113 

Water: 

Composing room $22. 97 

Pressroom 45. 90 

Bindery room 22. 94 

. 191.81 

Gasoline: 

Composing room 870. 84 

Pressroom 199. 75 

1,070.59 

Telephone service: 

Composing room 21. 03 

Pressroom 21. 02 

Bindery room 20. 95 

63.0a 

Towel service: 

Composing room 29. 82 

Pressroom 17. 21 

Bindery room. 18. 97 

66.0(T 

Fuel and gas: 

Bindery 53.86 

77,460.01 

Teansportation Division. 

auto service. 
Services: 

Trips, 25,100 kilometers, at 16 cents $4, 016. 00 

Trips, 36,191 kilometers, at 18 cents 6, 514. 38 

Trips, 29,281 kilometers, at 15 cents... 4,392. 15 

Trips. 24,639 kilometers, at 17 cents 4, 188. 63 

Additional for waiting time, as per reports 34. 33 

Trips, auto hire 3, 290. 00 

Labor on department cars 430. 80 

22,866.29 



Operation: 

Insurance U8. 09 

Stationery and supplies 2, 040. 78 

Wages 4, 765. 12 

Power and light 7. 80 

Water 183.59 

G asoline 3, 564 . 09 

Per diems 1, 287. 90 

Telephone service 73. 27 

Tires and tubes 3, 974. 90 

Total operating expenses 16, 015. 54 

Auto hire 3, 290. 00 

Labor on department cars 430. 80 

Reserve for purchases and renewals 3, 129. 95 

22,866.29 

Delivery Service. 

Insurance 19. 90 

"Wages : 497. 65 

Gasoline 178. 20 

Materials and supplies 41. 06 

Amount of charges distributed 736. 81 



Appendix III. 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 

San Juan, Porto Rico, 

August 10, 1920. 
The Hon. Arthur Yager, 

Governor of Porto Rico^ San Juan^ P. R. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit to your consideration my report concerning the 
different tasks brought about by the department of health in its several bureaus and 
divisions during the fiscal year which ended the 30th of last June. 

I have turned my attention primarily to the gravest and most urgent problems of 
hygiene and have always endeavored to produce a result in strict conformity with 
the most modern principles which ought to regulate a sanitary organization so that it 
may be regarded as well established and efficient. 

In accordance with the program I planned out a little less than three years ago, 
when I first took charge of this delicate position which was intrusted to me and which 
I still hold, I have given special attention to the campaign against the tuberculosis, 
the uncinariasis, and the malaria, because I consider that the prevalence of these 
three diseases is the most serious sanitary problem of Porto Rico. And that campaign, 
notwithstanding the slender resources at the disposal of the department for such a 
stupendous work, has been very earnest and more active than ever before. 

The struggle against tuberculosis has resulted in a grand success. A year ago the 
idea«of founding an insular sanatorium was first unfolding. To-da^^, owing to the 
purely philanthropic impulses of the Porto Rican people, with no distinction of class, 
who have liberall)^ given most generous contributions, we can point to a splendid 
realization of that idea. The noble assistance of the legislature has been added and 
the result is a splendid institution, nearing completion and which has already borne 
beneficial effects, and which in a short time, being finished, will be one of the best of 
its class and a tribute to the honor and glory of this country which has produced it. 

In the letter I addressed to the Rockefeller Foundation, dated October 6, 1919, I 
laid bare the situation of Porto Rico with respect to the problem of public health which 
constitutes the prevalence of the three above-mentioned diseases and the efforts of 
the department to avoid their propagation and to accomplish their extermination, 
and begged that assistance should be rendered, as has been done in other countries, 
to aid our earnest endeavors. 

Dr. John B. Grant was sent by the Rockefeller Foundation a few weeks afterwards, 
who, in conjunction with Dr. Victor G. Heiser, who joined him in Porto Rico some 
time later, made a minute investigation of the conditions. Several other medical 
officials of the department accompanied them. The results of the research confirmed 
the belief that 90 per cent of our people suffer with uncinariasis, which proves that the 
hookworm infection, especially m country districts, is very severe. 

The Rockefeller Foundation has offered to cooperate and as soon as conditions are 
arranged, probably very soon, a joint work will begin. In Utuado many important 
results have been already brought about on these lines. 

In most of the towns .where malaria is prevalent in the district the department has 
established dispensaries. Those of Barceloneta, Guanica, Salinas, and Guayama have 
worked all the year. 

We have not had to deplore any epidemic in the past year. General mortality has 
been at the rate of 23.33 deaths to every 1,000 inhabitants; a total of 30,280 deaths 
were registered — a rate somewhat high, yet but lower compared with previous years. 
Infant mortalitv has been a special subject of study, toward which I beg to call your 
attention elsewhere. An outbreak of influenza went over the island in t ebruary and 
March, but its form was mild and was soon stamped out. 

In the organization of the department of health this year a fundamental change 
has occurred, owing to the working of the new municipal law. It has brought about 
realljr grave results, which have affected our work of eight or nine years in a per- 
ceptible manner, work which has had great success since 1911. I should be grateful 
if your honor would think over this point, carefully and with deliberation, and weigh 

114 



KEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 115 

it. So permit me to call your attention to other parts of this report, where the present 
organization of the department and the outcome of the general inspection of health 
matters carried on in the island are discussed, on which in pursuance of my duty I 
have taken every notice which I considered pertinent to the case. 

And in examining the other sections of this report ^our honor will notice what have 
been the other works of the department of health during the year 1919-20, all related 
to the general work of sanitation; those of the division of sanitary engineering, those 
of the chemical and biological laboratories, those for the prevention and control of 
transmissible diseases, etc. A special section has been devoted to the charitable 
institutions under the direction and government of this department. 

Respectfully, » 

A. Ruiz Soler, 
Commissioner of Health. 

Report of the Insular Board of Health. 

The Governor of Porto Rico, 

San Juan, Porto Rico, 

Sir: I have the honor to forward to you the annual report for the fiscal year 1919-20. 

The insular board of health consists at present of the following members: Dr. F. 
del Valle Atiles, president; Dr. Gustavo Mufioz, Dr. Jose S. Belaval, and Dr. Rafael 
Bernabe, physicians; Mr. Juan Hernandez Lopez, attorney; Mr. F. W. Dalrymple, 
sanitary engineer; Mr. Jose J. Monclova, pharmacist, and Dr. Jose Luga Yiiia, secre- 
tary. Office of the board, clerk, and stenographer, Mr. Juan Morales Diaz. 

The insular board of health, in accordance with the law, has held ordinary and 
extraordinary meetings as several subjects have demanded and has held also hearings 
sought for by persons interested in sanitary matters. During the period to which 
this report refers , many different subjects have been studied and determined, regu- 
lations and amendments dictated, taking into consideration the intervention that 
the new municipal law, which took effect in October, 1919, assigned to the munici- 
palities in public health matters. 

It is not yet time to judge of the effects of this new law in what affects the future 
advance which the various sanitary services, which have been placed in the hands 
of the municipalities, may have to follow. 

Among others is the decision as to the location for the hospitals for patients of 
uncinariasis and malaria, which by consent of the legislature wa's vested in this board. 

The selected towns, considered from a statistical point, to establish these hospitals 
were Utuado and Lares for those for the patients of uncinariasis, and Guayama and 
Barceloneta for those for the patients of malaria. These towns are closely connected 
with the zones more intensively affected by the said diseases. 

The board stated then, and repeats it now, that other regions of the island are also 
in need of these hospitals and recommends that the necessary number of dispensaries 
be established to combat extensively the two diseases mentioned. 

In connection with this subject the board received the visit of the commission 
sent by the Rockefeller Foundation to the island to study the best means of cooper- 
ating in the sanitary work of Porto Rico. 

Drs. Grant and Heiser, who composed •the commission, disclosed their plan, which 
consisted in contributing with 75 per cent of the expenses which should be made to 
open the campaign against uncinariasis, while the Government should contribute 
with 25 per cent, and in providing for a number of scholarships, equal to that pro- 
vided for by the insular government, to train Porto Rican doctors for the public 
health servdce in the island. 

Both propositions, as well as the preventive plan projected by the Rockefeller 
Foundation Commission, were approved by the board, which offered to help in these 
works as the commissioner of health and representatives of the medical profession 
had already offered, too. 

We have much satisfaction in stating that the work of prophylaxis of uncinariasis 
has already begun in the district of Utuado. 

In the campaign undertaken by the department of health to contend against tuber- 
culosis, the board, invited by the commissioner of health, agreed to take charge of 
the funds collected from private persons, societies, and corporations and interfere 
in their investment. 

By means of circulars it has been tried to encourage persons who by their position 
are able to help in building cottages for tubercular patients in the sanatorium. The 
board has also gone around on visits of inspection to see that the funds invested have 
been employed properly. 



116 REPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

There are 20 cottages built and 19 are under construction. The money collected 
up to June 30, 1920, amounted to $92,949.10; of this sum to the same date were invested 
$72,248.65. 

At the same time, with funds from the insular treasury, the department is con- 
structing other buildings included in the general plan, such as some cottages for 
patients, the administration building, the children's hospital, etc. 

In accordance with the provisions of section 2 of act No. 51, of June 11, 1919, for 
the reorganization of the Institute of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the president 
of the board, who forms part of the administrative board of the institute, attended 
all meetings held. 

By act No. 76, of 1919, for the erection of an asylum for the patients of leprosy in 
the island and their isolation, two of the members of the insular board of health are 
nominated to form part of the board in charge of the establishment of the said asylum. 

During the year there were two threatened epidemics, one of cerebrospinal menin- 
gitis and the other of bubonic plague, which fortunately were but false alarms, neither 
confirmed by scientific research nor by after events. " However, all the proper pre- 
ventive measures were taken in each case. 

The year has passed without our having to complain of any epidemic whatever. 

The board, having good reasons through its practice, reconsidered the regulation 
for the prevention of infant mortality by tetanus and blindness by ophthalmia neo 
natorum, amended sanitary regulation No. 43, Art. I, which refers to transmissible 
diseases; made one sanitary regulations, Nos. 3, 12, 15, and 28, and approved regu- 
lations for the medical inspection of the public schools and for moving-picture theaters, 
theaters, ball rooms, and conference halls, which were sent to the Executive Council 
for its approval. 

Three regulations are in project under study: One to prevent the infection and rein- 
fection of the soil with hookworm in rural zones, another to prevent the propagation 
of venereo-syphilitic diseases, and another for the regulation of the manufacture of 
sausages and other cooked eatables. These three regulations are considered indis- 

Eensable; the first to assist in the extinction of uncinariasis and other diseases caused 
y the polluted soil, the other to foresee the far-reaching effects connected with 
sexual life, and the last to prevent the pollution of certain foods prepared for the 
people's consumption. 
Respectfully, 

Dr. F. DEL Valle Atiles, President. 
JosB Lugo Vina, Secretary. 

THE PRESENT ORGANIZATION. 

A fundamental change has taken place during the past year in the organization of 
the department of health owing to the working of the new municipal law which gives 
to the municipal assemblies the nomination of the health officers in their various 
territories. As was to be expected, it is detrimental to the sanitary progress of the 
country and it may be stated that it is not progression but retrogression. 

All modern opinions agree that centralization is a necessity in sanitary matters, 
owing to the distinctive technical status of such a governmental service, above all in 
countries constituted like Porto Rico — small, densely populated, with many means 
of communication, short distances to travel, centers of population poor, with slender 
resources, where it is not possible that each municipality give itself a complete modern 
sanitary organization, for that would be out of reach of its resources. 

For these reasons and no others, I am bound to recommend the restitution of the 
service of sanitation -centralized as it worked since the approval of the act of March 
14, 1912. 

I am the first to recognize that for its liberal spirit and for the opportunities of devel- 
opment which it offers, the new municipal law is a work that of itself alone is sufficient, 
to bestow distinction on the legislature which approved it; but unfortunately the 
months carry the proof that as far as health goes it has not given the hoped-for results. 
By our observations we are competent to prove — 

1. That the municipal commissioners of health lack liberty of action. In many 
cases they have begged assistance from the officers of this department, shrinking from 
solving sanitary problems of their competence for fear of the consequences among their 
local connections. 

2. They lack so many necessaries, by reason of the poverty of the municipal budgets, 
that their work is rendered ineffective. 

3. Believing themselves absolute autonomists, sometimes they refuse' to fulfill sani- 
tary re|:ulations in spite of orders received from this department. There are means to 
discipline this fault, but so slow that if it should occur in case of an epidemic or other- 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



117 



emergencies not only the town but the neighboring ones and the whole island might 
be in peril. 

4. In case of an epidemic there could be no reconcentration in the place of danger 
because each is limited to his municipality. 

5. Many of the auxiliaries entrusted with much of the work are not always competent 
for the duty. 

6. In many towns the commissioner of health has no auxiliaries and has also the 
public charity service to care for, with the result that neither branch can be properly 
attended. 

7. The whole cost of the service, adding up the appropriations made for sanitation 
in the municipal budgets, is much greater now than before. 

MORTALITY. 

The following table shows the mortality in Porto Rico during the past decade: 



Year. 


Estimated 
population. 


Deaths. 


Rate per 
thousand. 


Year. 


Estimated 
population. 


Deaths. 


Rate per 
thousand. 


1909-10 


1,118,012 
1,133,674 
1,149,336 
1,164,998 
1,180,660 


24,800 
26,579 
28, 704 
26,034 
21,775 


22.18 
23.45 
24.97 
22.35 ' 
18.44 


1914-15 


1,196,322 
1,211,984 
1, 227, 646 
1,234,840 
1,258,970 


23,664 
26,572 
34,939 
34,457 
39.974 


19.78 


1910 11 


1915-16 


21.92 


1911 12 


1916-17 


28.46 


1912 13 


1917-18 


27.71 


1913 14 


1918-19 


31.75 









The highest death rate is noticed in the three last years, years when epidemics 
occurred ; in those of 1916-17 and 1917-18 that of measles, and in 1918-19 we had the 
influenza. 

The annual average of deaths in this decade was 28,750; i. e., 24,095 per thousand of 
inhabitants. If the last two decades immediately preceding, that of 1888 to 1898 and 
that of 1899 to 1909, in which the annual average of deaths was 26,559, or 30.01 per thou- 
sand in the first, and 28,210, or 27.27 per thousand in the second, are examined it will 
be noticed that, in spite of a notable increase in one year or the other, the death rate 
in Porto Rico has been decreasing. 

During this year ending June 30, 1920, 30,280 deaths were registered, which repre- 
sents a mortality of 23.33 per thousand. This computation compares favorably not 
only with the three previous years last past, but is also less than that which the aver- 
ages of the three decades before cited show. However, this can not be considered 
satisfactory, for if we examine the death rates of other civilized countries which boast 
of having good public health ser\dces this death rate is still high. And we must trust 
that the decline begun will become every year greater, as the causes of this grave 
mortality are overcome in response to the persevering endeavors of the department 
of health in conformity with the resources in its power and the cooperation of the 
people. 

Our population is one of the densest on earth. More than 70 per cent are in the 
country districts, badly housed and fed, ill in health and ignorant of the first princi- 
ples of hygiene. 

Until the people have learned to preserve and protect their health and have more 
ample means to provide themselves with better houses and food so as to reduce their 
miseries, no positive result, no recompense for all our efforts can be obtained. 

This undertaking is not that for one year, nor two, nor three. It is a systematic 
labor of several years, as I have shown. The problem is not by any means easily or 
rapidly solved. 

INFANT MORTALITY. 

I place below a synopsis of statistics on infant mortality in Porto Rico in the past 10 
years, that of 1919-20 included, separating the lapse in two periods so that a more 
exact comparison may be made. 

It will be noticed that in the first lustrum infant mortality was almost even, for one 
only observes a sHght falling off in the three last years of that period. But beginning 
the second, in the year 1915-16, an increase begins that in the following three years is 
of considerable consequence. 

By searching we discover that, as we have stated before, these were years of epi- 
demics—in 1916-17 and 1917-18 of measles and in 1918-19 influenza. The last year, 
which has just passed, shows a notable decrease. 

By the said statement infant mortaUty can be gauged by comparing it with the 
general mortality. So in the last column the percentage, which one represents of the 
other, year by year, is given. 



118 



KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Statement showing infant mortality in Porto Rico in the last 10 years, from July 1, 1910^ 

to June 30, 1920. 

SEPARATED IN LUSTRUMS. 





Ages. 


Total. 


Percentage 
that infant 


Fiscal years. 


Less than 
1 year. 


More than 

1 and less 

than 2. 


More than 

2 and less 

than 5. 


mortality 

is of 

general 

mortality. 


1910-11 


6,348 
6,554 
6,459 
5,713 
6,644 


3,115 
3,233 
2,843 
2,295 
2,583 


2,825 
3,139 
2, 673 
2,125 
2,037 


12,288 
12,926 
11,975 
10,133 
11,264 


45.85 


1911-12 


45.38 


1912-13 


46 


1913-14 . . 


46.53 


1914-15 


47.60 






Average 


6,343 

6,951 
8,410 
7,501 
7,603 
7,434 


2,814 


2,560 

2,505 
3,914 
4,317 
4,245 
2,720 


11,717 


46.27 






1915-16 . . 


2,997 
4,385 
4,184 
3,667 
2,897 


12,453 
16,709 
16,002 
15,515 
13,051 


46.86 


1916-17 


48.40 


1917-18 


46.44 


1918-19 


38.78 


1919-20 


43.09 






Average 


7,579 


3,646 


3,540 


14,746 


44.71 






SUMMARY. 

Total 


69,617 
6,961 


32,199 
3,219 


30,500 
3,050 


132,316 
13,231 




Average : 


45.49 







Another method much practiced is to count how many deaths of babies under 1 
year occur per every thousand births, in this way: 



Fiscal years. 


Births. 


Number 

of deaths 

under 

1 year. 


Number 
of deaths 
per every 
thousand 
births. 


Fiscal years. 


Births. 


Number 

of deaths 

imder 

1 year. 


Number 
of deaths 
per every 
thousand 
births. 


1910-11 


37,692 
39,874 
41,002 
45,609 
46,947 
45,590 


6,348 
6,554 
6,459 
5,713 
6,644 
6,951 


168.68 
164. 62 
157. 52 
125. 26 
141.52 
152. 46 


1916-17 


42, 259 
43,261 
53,348 
50,729 


8,410 
7,501 
7,603 
7,434 


199.01 


1911-12 


1917-18 


173.39 


1912-13 


1918-19 


142. 51 


1913-14 


1919-20 


146.54 


1Q14 Ti 


Average 




1915-16 


44,631 


6,961 


155.97 







Note.— It is proper to recollect that in Porto Rico many births occur every year which are never registered 
in spite of the law enjoining registration within a short period after birth. 

The nosological species responsible for so many deaths at such tender ages can be 
seen below: 



Diseases. 


1915-16 


1916-17 


1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


Total. 


Congenital debility ... 


1,138 
822 
726 
180 
118 

3,454 
119 
12 

5,884 


1,380 

1,112 
676 
195 
147 

4,374 
233 
28 

8,564 


1,166 
661 
508 
171 
118 
5,265 
94 
38 
7,979 


1,152 

1,319 

600 

145 

109 

4,028 

88 

48 

8,026 


1,315 

1,333 

552 

163 

46 

4,240 

58 

46 

5,298 


6,151 


Rickets 


5,247 


Infantile tetanus 


3,062 


Umbilical hemorrhage . ... 


854 


Lack of care 


538 


Enteritis, under 5 years •. . . 


21,363 


Whooping cough 


692 


Diphtnerfa 


172 


Otner diseases 


35,751 






Total 


12,453 


16,709 


16,002 


15,515 


13,051 


73,730 







NoTE.—We have considered it sufficient to confine ourselves in this statement to the last 5 years. 



BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF HEALTH. 



119 



The facts brought forward are sufficient to show that the death rate of infants is 
high in this country. 

As Whipple says, *'It is indeed a serious, complex problem, one difficult to under- 
stand." Here, as in all countries, ''a problem which goes beyond itself," closely 
connected with others also transcendental referring to the social and economical 
status. For this reason hygienists like Newsholme do not hesitate to state that * 'infant 
mortality is the most sensitive index of social welfare and of sanitary improvements 
which we possess." Others — but we can brand them as exaggerators — say that *'it is 
to the health officer what the clinical thermometer is to the physician." 

These statistics reveal that the greater part of this mortality — ^in some years nearly 
half and in others more than half of the total — ^is registered in oabies under 1 year old. 
If we investigate, we shall find that infantile tetanus, umbilical hemorrhage, congen- 
ital debility, and lack of care are responsible for nearly all of such deaths; all avoid- 
able causes if the value of personal hygiene during the whole period of gestation and 
the special care that must be rendered to the new-born child were fully appreciated. 
We must not forget the immense part that misery plays in this. 

Next comes the highest figure in infants between 1 and 2 years old. The diseases 
cause of the high death rates at this age are chiefly enteritis and rickets. The origin 
of these troubles? In nearly every case improper and often very scarce food. The 
high price of milk and its adulteration favor this. 

And now the subject of adulterated milk is broached, I must not omit to record 
the thousand and one difficulties the department has met in the campaign it has 
begun that milk for public consumption should be of good quality. I am really 
sorry to point out that all the efforts that are made to discover and prosecute the 
adulterators are in most cases vainly expended. W^ith much greater eloquence than 
I can bring to bear on this head the appended statement will show. 

Statement showing the cases of adulteration of milk proved by the chemical laboratory 
and the cases filed in the courts. 



Results. 


San 
Juan.' 


Are- 
cibo. 


Agua- 
dilla. 


Maya- 
guez. 


Ponce. 


Gua- 
yama. 


Huma- 
cao. 


Total. 


Acquitted 


1 

1 
17 
9 






4 
23 

4 


7 
25 

2 
17 






12 


Convicted 




1 
1 


3 




53 


Quashed 


24 


Pending 






26 
















Total cases reported 


28 




2 


31 


51 

1 

18 

8 


3 




115 


Juvenile court 


1 


Not reported 


43 


8 




2 


4 
6 


6 


1 
1 


82 


Proceeding unknown 


i.fi 












Total number, of adulterations 
proved by the laboratory 


71 


8 


4 


41 


78 


9 


2 


1213 



1 This figure should be 222, Nine other samples w^ere analyzed and adulteration proved in them — 5 sent 
by private residences. 1 sent by the superintendent of the insane asylum, 2 sent by the assistant commis- 
sibner of health, and i sent by the commissioner of health, but all of them were unofficially taken. 

Statement showing imprisonment penalty imposed upon convicts. 



District courts. 


12 hours. 


Iday. 


From 1 

to 
10 days. 


From 10 

to 
20 days. 


From 20 

to 
30 days. 


Number 
of sen- 
tences. 


San Juan 


1 










1 


Arecibo ^ 


1 








Aguadilla . ... 










1 


1 


Mayaguez 




2 


18 
8 

1 


3 
3 
1 


23 


Ponce 




14 


25 


Guayama 




1 


3 


Humacao - - 
























Total. 


1 


3 


27 


7 


15 


53 







120 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



The following facts are eminently clear: 

1. In spite of the information that the director of the chemical laboratory furnishes 
as soon as an adulteration is proved by the analysis of the sample, not all the cases 
are brought before the competent court. Out of 213 cases of adulteration of milk 
duly proved, only 115 — a little less then 50 per cent — were brought before the court. 

2. Not only were most of the adulterators not accused, as they ought to have been, 
but very few of those brought before the courts — less than half — were convicted. 
It can be observed at the same time, beside some acquittals, an important number of 
cases quashed. For example, in the district of San Juan out of 71 proved cases of 
adulteration only 28 were brought to court, of which number 9 are still pending, 
1 was dismissed as the defendant had died, 9 were dismissed upon application of the 
fiscal, 7 were dismissed for want of proof, 1 was acquitted, and 1, the only one, was 
condemned to 12 hours' imprisonment. 

3. In the cases where the defendants have been found guilty, the penalty has been 
rather light, for none has been greater than 30 days imprisonment. 

In order that infant mortality may be checked even slowly, it is necessary (1) that 
the mothers of Porto Rico, notably those of the poor class, should know better how to 
take care of themselves during the period of pregnancy; (2) that they may know better 
how to attend to the new-born child. The midwife who has not a diploma, ignorant, 
is responsible for the loss of many babies; (3) that they should know better what 
nourishment to give the child during its first year, nothing better than the maternal 
lactancy, and afterwards what it ought to be fed. 

From all this can be deduced the necessity of a vigorous campaign to bring to the 
women's understanding this knowledge by pamphlets, articles in newspapers and 
magazines, lectures, etc. The girls in the higher grades of the public schools, those 
attending classes of domestic science, must be initiated in all that concerns the feeding 
of children. They will carry this information to their homes and when in their turn 
they become mothers it will be useful to them. The municipalities which have no 
maternity hospitals should secure midwives qualified to wait on poor and indigent 
women, and distribute gratis packets containing all necessaries for the imibilical 
cure. Already in another part of this report on speaking on infantile tetanus in Porto 
Rico, I have pointed out the important undertakings of the insular board of health, 
which, interested also in the problem, recently approved sanitary regulations No. 64 
for the prevention of infantile tetanus and blindness by ophthalmia neonatorum. 

There is no doubt that infantile mortality will be on the decrease when knowledge 
becomes more extended and when the conditions under which our poor people Uve, 
especially the country people; better considerably so that there be more hygiene, 
more comfort, and fewer privations in their homes. 

To show how the means influences mortality, especially infant mortality, one has 
only to quote an example: The city of San Juan, with its three centers of population — 
Old San Juan, Puerta de Tierra, a suburb inhabited almost entirely by poor people 
sheltered in very unhealthy homes; and Santurce, where there is greater space, more 
modern buildings, and a population who for the most part live well. Study the fol- 
lowing statement and notice which sustains the highest death rate: 



San Juan 



Population 

General mortality 

Rate per thousand 

Infant mortality 

Percentage of general mortality 
StUlbirths 



19,302 

530 

25.3 

135 

25.47 

49 



Santurce. 



36,527 
730 
19.9 
268 
36.71 
114 



Puerta de 
Tierra, 



14,878 

440 

29.7 

336 

63.63 

62 



Total. 



70,707 
1,700 
24.04 

639 
37.59 

225 



EEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 121 

Table showing the death rate in Porto Rico by towns during the past decade. 



Towns, 



Adjuntas 

Agiiada 

Agiiadilla 

Agiias Buenas.. 

Aibonito 

Anasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta 

Barranqiiitas... 

Barros 

Bayamon 

Cabo Rojo 

Cagiias 

Camuy 

Carolina 

Cayey 

Ceiba 

CialGS 

Cidra 

Coamo 

Conierio 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Fajardo 

Giiaynabo 

Guanica 

Guayama 

Gnayanilla 

Giirabo 

Hatillo 

Hormigiieros. . . 

Humacao 

Isabela 

Jayuya 

Juana Diaz 

Juncos 

Lajas 

Lares 

Las Marias 

Loiza 

Luquillo 

Las Piedras 

Manati 

Maricao 

Maunabo 

Mayaguez 

Moca 

Morovis 

Naguabo 

Naranjito 

Patillas 

Peniielas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas — 

Rincon 

Kio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

Sabana Grande . 

Salinas 

San German 

San Juan 

San Lorenzo 

San Sebastian.. 

Santa Isabel 

ToaAlta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

XJtuado 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

Villalba 

Yabucoa 

Yauco , 

Vieques 

Culebra 



17.23 
23.55 
22.36 
16.76 
14.05 
23.72 
24.56 
27.23 



12.09 
14.04 
24.84 
26.12 
23.97 
14.99 
21.33 
22.70 



15.32 
15.95 
20.02 
13.70 
12.56 
16.38 
32.55 



33.43 
18.74 
20.02 
15.90 



19.49 
20.29 



26.51 
23.43 
15.81 
20.97 
22.20 
17.01 



Isla entera cada ano . 



20.18 
25.43 
18.58 
31.94 
15.69 
12.37 
23.11 
10.25 
27.55 
19.68 
25.50 
23.80 
19.79 
28.39 
18.06 
26.82 
27.71 
23. 21 
27.63 
15.83 
17.77 
28.74 
16.76 
22.07 
17.02 
2L05 
19.67 
2L98 



16.96 
2L90 
25.04 
10.65 



19.53 
29.03 
21.29 
15. 99 
18.25 
26.33 
28.07 
34.36 
28.69 
12.69 
14.36 
26.60 
21.79 
27.02 
18.01 
24.95 
24.10 



15.47 
15.55 

18.08 
15.72 
12.28 
14.85 
28.56 



32.59 
18.32 
21.04 
17.10 



24.43 
20.02 



28.78 
33.03 
21.99 
21.75 
18.61 
19.87 



23.55 
23.05 
21.43 
30.83 
16.14 
13.95 
25.34 
10.84 
28.80 
20.93 
26.06 
24.22 
21.41 
26.12 
22.80 
23. 94 
27.26 
26.84 
28.35 
18.53 
15.34 
38.60 
18.62 
23.39 
19.98 
22.14 
23.08 
22.74 



22.66 

22.07 

28.34 

7.30 



20.00 
25.83 
24.06 
21.44 
20.24 
35.67 
29.75 
26.11 
27.04 
11.52 
16.40 
27.54 
24.13 
23.76 
26.70 
20.02 
28.45 



17.35 
23.33 
15.21 
16.75 
15.48 
23.42 
30.65 



31.40 
16. 85 
24.95 
20.45 



24.48 
22.72 
24.13 
23.69 
31.26 
20.03 
20.59 
19.11 
17.90 



17.04 
30.14 
34.85 
19.62 
14.94 
29.60 
10.76 
28.58 
18.43 
25.57 
25.84 
22.19 
25.08 
21.50 
23.85 
16.68 
25.52 
29.26 
19.20 
18.11 
27.65 
20.22 
27.04 
15.00 
19.92 
25.88 
24.38 



29.73 
23.25 
22.42 
5.61 



18.64 
23.10 
21.07 
20.30 
19.18 
29.24 
23.51 
10.58 
24.62 
n.38 
13.20 
23.25 
23.62 
16.12 
23.64 
19.27 
3L88 



20.41 
19.43 
14.55 
19.29 
11.29 
17.57 
27.33 
19.11 



29.94 
15.70 
22.71 
18.54 
33.41 
23.43 
19.50 
21.40 
24.68 
28.30 
19.66 
19.54 
17.12 
15.96 



22.62 
21.51 
24.80 
31.67 
18.26 
18.50 
24.81 
11.67 
24.64 
17.93 
24. 11 
21.68 
20.68 
26.57 
22.75 
27.58 
22.40 
22.77 
25.93 
19.51 
15.20 
23.26 
16.39 
2L87 
2L61 
20.31 
23.83 
19.90 



23.93 
32.87 
24.56 
10.14 



16.33 
21.09 
20.90 
14.16 
14.55 
24.72 
2L22 
21.97 
18.19 
8.70 
12.72 
20.98 
18.56 
19.32 
16.17 
15.53 
22.54 



16.80 
13.68 
13.17 
14.80 
7.40 
16.11 
2L44 
20.91 



23.45 
11.64 
19.96 
15.52 
18.64 
15.58 
15.60 
21.69 
19.38 
26.02 
13.86 
17.39 
12.74 
14.26 



20.25 
22.07 
2L01 
25. 65 
18.67 
13.37 
16.25 
11.25 
21.74 
13.34 
20.12 
19.02 
18.53 
20.11 
18.03 
18.28 
16.94 
16.77 
23.22 
17.57 
17.01 
17.61 
14.42 
20.25 
16.25 
18.09 
19.50 
19.13 



19.10 
15.68 
15.18 

7.78 



18.05 
23.25 
20.35 
14.35 
16.08 
24.09 
24.12 
24.61 
19.71 
10.78 
14.23 
14.59 
19.95 
20.02 
20.78 
15.01 
24.77 



19.11 
16.12 
15.58 
17.44 
9.09 
21.02 
27.69 
19. 11 
16.58 
25.21 
19.02 
13.97 
24.65 
21.23 
15.31 
17.25 
19.94 
21.46 
19.81 
13.46 
20.47 
15.93 
14.84 
26.22 
16.87 
20.52 
23.61 
17.32 
26.99 
16.63 
15.28 
23.46 
10.08 
19.83 
17.68 
22.96 
19.82 
23.54 
18.10 
21.07 
18.31 
18.74 
15.00 
24.49 
15.35 
18.61 
18.57 
14.26 
17.07 
13.09 
17.97 
2L32 
22.47 



18.25 
23.21 
22.71 
1L32 



22.18 23.45 24.97 22.35 18.44 19.78 2L92 28.45 27.71 3L75 23.33 



23.65 
23. 57 
20.79 
21.16 
14.47 
27.53 
22.08 
23.92 
23.50 
23.50 
17.39 
,21. 03 
20.69 
23.64 
20.54 
16.61 
27.19 
26.40 
18.44 
17.79 
15.71 
18.57 
10.31 
18.27 
29.30 
21.49 
12.68 
35.48 
20.65 
15.24 
25.17 
21.63 
18.02 
15.23 
23.74 
26.71 
24.06 
16.41 
17.37 
16.03 
17.82 
26.36 
14.93 
2L30 
23.75 
22.81 
30.86 
19.64 
17.61 
31.71 
12.59 
23.04 
20.60 
31.21 
2L77 
20.09 
21.87 
22.39 
19.51 
29.67 
21.10 
24.93 
19.41 
17.87 
27.64 
20.13 
22.77 
14.91 
19.30 
21.32 
21.61 



16.12 
23.41 
22.54 
4.86 



24.24 
32.56 
25.65 
25.21 
17.51 
34.11 
32.18 
34.16 
36.37 
11.72 
12.62 
31.21 
25.45 
35.16 
23.73 
2L25 
38.14 
39.49 
23.53 
26.98 
17.02 
24.49 
11.36 
24.41 
39.52 
35. 08 
15.05 
40.55 
18.86 
26.08 
24.68 
31.53 
27.78 
20.44 
23.54 
32.21 
39.67 
17.97 
25.54 
19.41 
25.32 
38.03 
25.42 
27.25 
29.76 
28.55 
36.93 
28.02 
20.13 
24.28 
14.41 
29.82 
24.94 
34.51 
29.62 
30.62 
28.77 
32.64 
26.87 
27.19 
26.73 
38.81 
29.24 
22.70 
34.47 
23.54 
22.81 
19.36 
23.89 
23.46 
28.34 



28.63 
27.62 
29.15 
7.65 



29.67 
34.19 
23.60 
29.59 
22.62 
30.13 
29.61 
27.59 
32.68 
13.96 
21.18 
24.23 
28.32 
33.95 
24.34 
18.12 
37.58 
34.41 
28.55 
29.99 
18.20 
28.29 
13.17 
22.93 
32.99 
29.13 
17.73 
27.20 
24.12 
24.72 
28.07 
26.97 
30.91 
19.45 
28.99 
27.21 
31.15 
19.88 
33.18 
23.90 
28.07 
29.63 
29.79 
28.11 
26.12 
32.15 
35.68 
27.67 
22.91 
13.97 
14.84 
29.94 
24.27 
32.41 
31.37 
27.68 
28.71 
29.10 
32.08 
18.04 
28.96 
28.25 
26.19 
26.55 
28.87 
2L38 
22.74 
16.85 
27.13 
22.80 
3L78 
22.94 
20.05 
32.87 
25.58 
5.13 



ot 



42.23 
59.16 
35.03 
32.65 
23.61 
47.72 
32.70 
26.30 
36.11 
19.90 
3L04 
24.19 
33.93 
35.53 
29.80 
18.04 
37.92 
32.57 
30.77 
30.35 
2L44 
26.56 
21.38 
26.53 
29.11 
3L70 
16.56 
3L15 
30.04 
21.48 
33.60 
45.09 
27.08 
23.36 
34.63 
29.00 
25.63 
2L26 
44.29 
32.45 
33.80 
41.07 
33.61 
29.05 
38.84 
33.48 
46.76 
4L33 
30.88 
15.25 
2L57 
29.66 
36.36 
35.13 
33.65 
48.79 
32.09 
28.18 
28.28 
27.37 
33.01 
29.21 
28.34 
36.82 
3L57 
25.40 
22.38 
24.55 
37.34 
20.43 
25.18 
35.34 
33.01 
32.33 
27.12 
5.52 



d. 



23.24 
33.21 
26.15 
13. 98 
20.13 
31.01 
28.49 
25.16 
23.41 
13.39 
16.44 
23.78 
23.69 
26.00 
2L44 
20.35 
24.59 
26.62 
22.19 
18.87 
15.94 
16.45 
15.79 
20.19 
23.35 
15.28 
21.37 
24.47 
19.45 
23.06 
19.29 
23.78 
22.21 
18.58 
20.38 
25.20 
26.77 
19.23 
20.32 
18.63 
20.74 
25.60 
18.83 
23.91 
20.50 
20.19 
32.11 
2L78 
18.01 
27.23 
14.65 
2L49 
16.31 
28.58 
22.33 
29.97 
25.13 
22.62 
2L78 
26.91 
2L87 
24.09 
19.52 
20.27 
32.93 
16.46 
2L02 
19.14 
2L73 
26.47 
3L02 
2L70 
25.63 
26.82 
26.01 
9.54 



122 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Division of Transmissible Diseases. 



TUBERCULOSIS. 



In the fight to control tuberculosis, which threatens to spread more and more 
and preys upon by choice the poor classes, more open to the ravages of the disease, 
due to the conditions under which they live favorable to the development of the 
malady, three factors are indispensable: The sanatorium to treat incipient cases 
which are curable, the hospital to isolate those in an advanced stage or chronic cases, 
and the dispensary with visiting nurses to attend those patients who for one cause 
or another remain in their homes. 

This necessity has been the primary aim of the campaign which the department 
of health has just been fulfilling, every day more actively and intensely, especially 
in the last two years. 

The statistics of this terrible disease which destroys so many lives in Porto Rico 
are more than sufficient to jhstify every effort we make, however enormous it is, to 
overcome this harrassing scourage. Look below: » 



Years. 


Deaths. 


Percent- 
age of 
mortality. 


Years. 


Deaths. 


Percent- 
age of 
mortality. 


1910-1 1 


2,518 
1,864 
1,719 
1,587 
1,924 


9.47 
6.49 
6.6 

7.28 
8.13 


1915-16 


2,274 
2,579 
2,505 
2,674 
2,545 


S. 55 


1911-12 


1916-17 


7.38 


1912-13 


1917-18 


7.26 


1913-14 


1918-19. 


6.68 


1914-15 


1919-20 


8.4 









Tha campaign was started in the middle of 1917 when, by the provisions of the 
new organic act of Porto Rico, the appropriation which the A nti tubercular League 
cf San Juan collected to maintain a sanatorium, established in El Seboruco, was 
suppressed and the department took charge of the care of the sick. At the same 
time Camp Las Casas was to be built in the same place and the military authorities 
commanded the removal of the sanatorium. Where? It was necessary to find another 
site. Meanwhile it was decided to isolate the patients temporarily in the quarantine 
hospital on the Marina. 

Many properties were seen and considered until finally it was decided to buy a 
tract of land in the barrio of Sabana Liana, near Rio Piedras, the owner of which 
promised to sell. Immediately, among the neighboring proprietors, a storm of objec- 
tions were raised; they thought that their lands would suffer a decrease in value and 
it was impossible to place the sanatorium there. 

The department could not wait the decision of the Circuit Court of Boston, icy 
which it had appealed against the decision of the United States District Court for 
Porto Rico in an action brought' by these complaining proprietors, decision favorable 
to them, for it meant a delay of months, which in so urgent a case was not cfesy to 
bear. And what a contrast. In a few days the department obtained a tract of land 
much better, situated in the barrio of Monacillos, municipality of Rio Piedras, con- 
sisting of 107 cuerdas, a magnificent place of singular beauty, high, with plenty of 
purest air and a pleasant climate, thanks to the generosity of the noble philanthropist 
Don Pedro Arzuaga y Peraza, who made donation of the land to the people of Porto 
Rico so that the sanatorium for the tubercular could be erected. 

With the small means that the department then had at its disposal, only about a 
year and half ago, the 26th of September, 1918, the first building was begun. Being 
not suflScient, the available funds appropriated by the legislature for the construction 
of the sanatorium, owing to the limited resources in the insular treasury, an appeal 
was made to the charitable and generaous people of the island, pointing out to them 
the advantages and benefits which would accrue from this institution to everyone 
and entreating them to contribute, as much as their means permitted, so that the 
project might have a tangible reality inside of a very short time. 

There was no need to wait for a response. Without distinction of class the people 
have rendered in a highly altruistic manner generous and munificent support. In 
the few months up to June 30, 1920, the department of health has received donations 
amounting to the sum of $92,949.10. Of this sum $72,248.65 has been invested. 

It is right to state here that the insular board of health, which has lent sa much 
valuable assistance to the department in this campaign, was made from the beginning 



REPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 123 

a depositary of the funds, and all expense and investment has been subject to its 
approval and verification. , 

Now the insular sanatorium numbers 20 buildings finished and 19 in construction, 
with water and electric current supply, and soon a road which, starting from the 
entrance of the establishment, will join the Military Road will be finished. 

As soon as the first cottages were finished, the 25th of December, 1919, 19 patients 
who were in the quarantine hospital were transferred to the sanatorium. From that 
time, according as more room has been available, the number of patients has been 
increased. Up to the 30th of June last past, 90 tubercular patients have received 
treatment. 

By every estimation the assistance rendered has been very efficient. During the 
year two cases left, one immune without any pronouncement of the lesion during the 
stay, the other inactive, apparently cured; both without the Koch bacilli on repeated 
microscopical examination of the sputum. 

The number of deaths is 28; 6 cases died in the quarantine hospital on the Marina 
and the rest in the insular sanatorium. By the following chart will be seen on one 
side the severity of the cases, on the other the time they were under treatment. 

CHART. 

Died in the quarantine hospital. — One case on the fourth day of treatment; very 
advanced stage. One case on the fifth day of treatment; very aavanced stage. One * 
case on the third day of treatment; very advanced stage. One case on the third month 
of treatment; advanced stage. One case on the third month and days; advanced 
stage. One case on the second month of treatment; advanced stage. 

Died in the insular sanatorium. — One case on the eleventh day of treatment. One 
case on the tenth day of treatment. One case on the fourth day of treatment. One 
case on the sixteenth day of treatment. One case on the sixteenth day of treatment. 
One case on the twenty- third day of treatment. One case on the twenty-fourth day 
of treatment. One case on the twelfth day of treatment. 

Died in the insular sanatorium with more time of treatment. — One case on the eighth 
month of treatment; laryngeal tuberculosis. One case on the third month and 
twelfth day; laryngeal tuberculosis. One case on the first month and a half; con- 
sumptive phthisis. One case on the first month and a half; acute miliary tuber- 
culosis. One case on the fourth month and twenty-first day; laryngeal tubercu- 
losis. One case on the fifth month; caseous tuberculosis. One case on the second 
month; consumptive phthisis. 

The greatest number of discharges was upon request. Of the patients under treat- 
ment at present, the oldest case is of 2 years, three are of 10 months, the rest are of 
less time: from 3 months and less than 3 months there are 16 cases. 

The clinical and anatomo-pathologic forms of the lesions answer to, the greater 
number, pulmonary tuberculosis pure caseous form, pneumonic chronic tuberculosis 
in full infectious activity: Two cases, fibro-caseous form; two cases, mute form; one 
case, complicated with diabetes; four cases, inactive form, tubercular process quiet; 
four cases, laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis; one case, osseous tuberculosis; 
one case, pleuritic effusion. 

The chart shows us that the greater number of cases are those of the hospital, because 
they are all of an advanced form. These are the very ones which should be isolated 
because, as we have before pointed out, they are those which present the greatest 
danger. The insular sanatorium will have a special section for them, the hospital 
section, whose works are hastened as much as possible so that soon it may be capable 
to contain a large number, as many as possible, of patients whose illness is already 
advanced or chronic. ^ 

The cure by fresh air, the cure by rest, and the cure by food tripod, almost a dogma 
of treatment, is practiced all the year. In many cases good results have been 
obtained which corroborates the universal remark of the positive worth of such a 
process. 

The patients receive three meals a day at fixed hours and without food between; 
there are special diets for certain cases whose symptoms demand it; overfeeding has 
been avoided. In this matter of food diets we have followed the scientific principles 
now accepted on the subject, considering the nutritive demands of each patient. 

The department has not limited its assistance only to the tuberculous patientu 
isolated in the insular sanatorium at Rio Piedras. Its aid has also been extended to 
the patients confined in the sanatorium of the Antitubercular League of Ponce; also 
under our direction, and in conformity with the appropriation in the budget, the 
sum ©f 110,000 is allotted each year toward the keeping up of that establishment. 



124 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

The report of patients admitted there shows that during the year 106 patients 
received treatment. There were 26 patients on June 30, 1920. 

I wish to make one observation more, which I consider indispensable and important: 
I believe that, if we wish to obtain better success which will conduce to a decisive 
victory in the fight against tuberculosis in a day not far off, it is necessary to provide 
the department of health with larger resources. In my iudgment, the leo^islature, 
always anxious to act in the interests of Porto Rico, should vote an appropriation for 
each year, during five consecutive years, not less than $75,000 to be dedicated to 
finish the construction of the insular sanatorium, which is the principal factor in the 
campaign. They should also vote another sum not less than $25,000 each year for 
the establishment of dispensaries in the principal towns of the island. 

UNCINARIASIS. 

The endeavors which this department is making now in some districts should be 
extended throughout the island. This is of such importance that it may be said that 
it supersedes in magnitude every other influence over the future of Poi*to Rico. It 
has been confirmed that 90 per cent of our fellow countrymen suffer with uncinariasis. 
and while this lasts, it will be impossible that our people reach the fullness of their 
development in any of the ways of life, should it be physical, mental, economic, or 
even moral. Our children suffer a serious set-back in their education, owing to the 
effects of > the disease on their intellectual capacity. 

With the slender resources at its disposal, the department has just been fighting to 
overcome, even to exterminate, the uncinariasic infection in Porto Rico, especially 
in the most assailed districts. 

On October 6, 1919, through the oflice of the Governor of Porto Rico, I addressed a 
letter to the Rockefeller Foundation of New York, explaining the serious problem of 
public health which constitutes the prevalence of three diseases which were and 
are the principal cause of the high death rate registered every year, tuberculosis, 
unicinariasis, and malaria, and begging that, as in other countries, they would help 
Porto Rico in the campaign to prevent their growth and attain their extinction. 

Governor Yager made this petition stronger by adding his own and forwarding it 
to its destination with the most favorable recommendations. 

A few weeks later, on December 27, Dr. John B. Grant arrived at the island as 
representative sent by the Rockefeller Foundation to make a survey of the condi- 
tions pointed out. From the study made by him, in company with Dr. Victor G. 
Heiser, another representative who arrived later, and with other medical officers of 
the insular department of health, we draw the following conclusions: 

1. With the exception of the urban centers the uncinariasis infection is excessively 
high (almost 90 per cent). 

2. As a rule, the severity of the infection is greater in the highlands, or, in other 
terms, considering the industries, the highest is found in the coffee districts in which 
also predominate the poorest economic conditions in the island. 

3. The index of hemoglobin and the worm count determined that the infection is 
besides high very severe. 

Such is the situation. To face it with better results, with the limited means which 
up till now we have obtained more satisfactory results could not be attained, the 
department needs in its budget a larger appropriation, that now received is quite 
insufficient, and, therefore, I recommend that a sum of half a million dollars be appro- 
priated for the first year and $100,000 for each of the succeeding ones, during a decade, 
to be able to realize a campaign which will conduct to a sure success. 

This campaign, as has been planned, will develop in the following manner: (a) 
Considering that it is not possible to do an effective work all over thjB island at once 
because for that a very large personnel would be needed and many more expenses 
would be originated, the work will have to be done b^ zones, (b) As in the problem 
of the control and extinction of uncinariasis the principal point is the infection of the 
soil, the first step would consist of what we might call the preliminary sanitation of 
the zone, which would be effected by a campaign for the construction of latrines, 
one for each house, constructed according to models prepared beforehand so that 
they result hygienic and economic at the same time. With the time the uncinarias 
in the soil will be extinct and it will nor be reinfected, (c) After that, and not before, 
the persons suffering with uncinariasis shall receive treatment by the administration 
of those drugs which the medical science prescribes for the case; such as tymol and 
chenopoiium oil. This treatment shall be administered in the dispensaries and 
at home. 



BEPOBT OF TH]S OOMMISSIOKEB OF HBALTH. 



126 



It is evident that in a work of this kind a very important factor which we must not 
overlook is the education of the people. For this reason an educative campaign 
jointlv with the other must be begun, especially among our country population, j&r 
it is there it is most greatly needed. 

In order that the work of the department this year by means of the dispensaries 
established in different towns, a statement showing the cases treated is inclosed. 
By this statement will be noticed that in Utuado and Lares the number of patients 
who have attended the dispensary has been large. It is because the work there is 
more intense than in any other district. In Utuado, besides the dispensary, a hospital 
has been established. 

MALARIA, 

It can be said that the campaign against malaria presents two aspects: (1) The 
active work for the extinction of mosquitoes performed in general all over the island, 
and (2) the treatment of malarial patients by means of the dispensary. The first 

Shase has been realized, petrolizing the breeding places, eliminating them by the 
rainage and complete sanitation of the grounds in which they were situated when 
it has been possible to do so. The second has been especially developed in those 
regions most affected by the disease, like those of Guanica, Barceloneta, Guayama, 
and Salinas, where it is endemic. The number of patients treated in the dispensaries 
established by the department in these towns has been this: 

Year 1919-20. 

Barceloneta 615 

Guanica 621 

Guayama 762 

Salinas 365 

The mortality caused by malaria in Porto Rico in the last lustrum is shown below: 



Fiscal years. 


Deaths. 


Percent- 
age of 
general 
mortality. 


Fiscal years. 


Deaths. 


Percent- 
age of 
general 
mortality. 


1915-16 


• 1,290 
1,877 
1,490 


3 

5.3* 

4.3 


1918-19 


1,524 
1,576 


3.9 


1916-17 


1919-20 


5.2 


1917-18 











Alternatively, in some years it has been greater and in others less. If an average 
is taken of the percentages of the five years, this would be 4.34. It is indubitable 
that in order to reduce this mortality from malaria a more intense campaign is neces- 
sary. This can not be undertaken imtil the department enjoys a larger appropriation 
for these ends, with the $30,000 a year now available it would not be enough. 

The Rockefeller Foundation a few months ago sent one of its sanitary engineers, 
Mr. H. W. Green, who is making a study of the lands round Salinas, near the Central 
Aguirre, in order to proceed to their drainage. 

Once this work is performed malaria will decrease, perhaps disappear altogether 
from that neighborhood. If there were fimds the department could perform the 
same work in the other malarial zones of Porto Rico. 

14748—20 9 



126 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table showing cases of uncinariasis treated in the different towns of the island during the 

fiscal year 1919-20. 



Towns. 


Under 
treat- 
ment 
fiscal 
year 
1918-19. 


New 
cases. 


Cured. 


Deaths. 


Aban- 
doned 
treat- 
ment. 


Under 
treat- 
ment. 


Adjuntas 


468 
289 
263 

45 
380 
373 
602 
1,000 

88 
186 
616 

33 

86 

95 
457 
212 
598 

10 
917 
196 
139 
666 
371 
167 
6 

90 

162 

303 

361 

309 

5 

353 

1,118 

121 

112 

3,357 

34S 

274 


151 


29 






590 


Agiiada 






289 


Agua li" 'a 


310 
223 
16S 
575 
656 

2,206 
23 
626 

3,825 


15 

218 

4 

488 

' 175 

1,168 

46 

4?3 

2,030 






558 


AtjTiias Buenas 




49 


1 


Aibonito 




550 


Ana vo 




331 
78 

1,809 
15 
87 

1,717 


129 


A roci bo 




1,095 
227 


Barce'oneta 


2 


Arr'^yo 


50 


Barranquitas 




302 


Barro^ 




694 


Bavamon 




33 


Cabo Rojo 


253 
444 
207 
136 
447 


5 
234 
182 
53 
60 




153 

78 

333 


181 


Ca^na^ .■ 




227 


Camuv 




149 


Caro Ina 




295 


Ca 'oy 






985 


Qdhx 






10 


Ciaes 


185 
215 
102 
578 
703 

80 

4 

616 

940 

59 

130 

158 

1,071 

328 


1 

60 

8 

57 

61 

68 

9 

61 

591 

15 

96 

34 

359 

163 






1,101 


Cilra 


1 
2 


170 
175 
994 
450 
142 


184 


Coimo 


56 


Comcrio 


193 


Corcal 




563 


Dira lo 




37 


Fajanio 






Gu \ n ioa 




417 


350 


G ua vama 




64 


Gua -anL a 




347 


Giirabn 






3P5 


Ha i 






433 


H imarao 




357 


360 


lia''>e a 


1 


617 


J ayu va 




1,118 


Juana i.)laz 


309 

3<?3 

2,64<i 

2,007 

451 

224 

93 

413 

261 

697 

158 

152 

248 

59 

79 

133 


116 

143 

1,171 

666 

65 


1 


209 
71 


104 


Jun'^;os 


281 


Larc=^ .- 


1 


517 


Las Afarias 


488 


1,201 
660 


lioiza 




Lnq'jillo 






224 


ManaM 


91 

1,206 

295 

536 

425 

1,279 

580 

218 

65 

267 

38 

323 

4 

208 

178 

450 

118 

1,841 

133 

224 


11 
91 
123 
635 
418 
135 
27 
152 
42 
50 






173 


Mark ao 






1 528 


Maunabo 






433 


Mava";iicz 


3 
24 


467 
18 


128 


Moca 


123 


Moro \r is 


1,296 
502 


N a ra » i i 1 


1 


298 
119 
13 
130 


Pati as 


6 


Poll c , 




89 


Qupbraiillas 




220 


Rincon 




38 


Rio Grande 


29 


112 






240 


Rio Piedras 






4 


Sabana Grande 


153 
646 

66 

2 

2,937 

95 

92 
120 
4,926 
599 
775 

24 
178 
129 
117 


82 

456 

36 

3 

2,253 

121 

187 

48 

2,660 

5 

545 

26 

130 

5 

136 






279 


Salinas 


5 


339 
28 
102 


24 


San German 


452 


San Lorenzo 




15 


San Sebastian 


2 


2,523 
107 


ToaAlta 




Tea Baja 


1 


108 


20 
72 


TrujilloAIto 


Utuado 


1,711 
478 
204 

26 
234 

78 
479 


2 


2,550 
848 
323 
9 
110 
136 
52 


1,425 
214 


Vega Alta 


Vega Baja 




111 

16 

172 


Vieques 




Villalba 




Yabucoa 




66 
408 


Yauco 








Total 


26,960 


34,632 


17,379 


46 


14,098 


30,069 





BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF HEALTH. 



127 



New cases classified hy months. 



Cases. 

July 3,085 

Augnst 6, 527 

September 3, 744 

October 2,543 

November 619 

December 1,317 

January 3, 791 



Cases. 

February 3, 470 

March 3, 457 

April 1,760 

May 2,295 

June 2, 024 

Total 34,632 



Summary. 

Dispensaries that work regularly 15 

Patients under treatment at the end of the year 1918-19 26, 960 

New cases presented during the year 34yi32 

Cases cured 17, 379 

Deaths 46 

Abandoned trea^ment 14, 098 

Patients under treatment at the end of this year 30, C69 

Towns with more cases under treatment: 

Utuado 4,926 

Barros 3, 825 

San Sebastian 2, ?37 

Lares 2, 648 

Barceloneta 2, 206, 

Las Marias 2, 007; 

Table showing the number of uncinariasic patients treated in the hospital of Utuado untiU 

June SO, 1920. . ^ 



Patients 
treated. 


Cured. 


Abandoned 
treatment. 


Under 
treatment. 


169 


110 


13 


46 



Results of the campaign for the construction of latrines in the district of Ututtdo' until 

June 30, 1920. 



Barrios. 



Salto Arriba 

Guaonico 

Arenas 

Salto Abajo 

Tetuan 

Vivi Aba'o 

Las Palm as 

Caonillas Arriba. 

Ca'»uanas 

Roncador 

Sabana Grande.. 
Angeles 





Houses 


Census. 


with 




latrines. 


1,248 


31 


(i90 


7 


1,836 


86 


1,130 


10 


1,736 


17 


2,118 


120 


444 


7 


1,119 


13 


2,768 


47 


1,098 


30 


1,032 


6 


2,733 


20 



Houses 
without 
latrines. 



198 
136 
287 
193 
233 
205 

83 

172 

207 

6 

20 
148 



Total 
num- 
ber of 
houses. 



229 
143 
373 
203 
250 
325 
90 
185 
254 
254 
254 
168 



Latrines approved. 



New. 






108 
89 

123 
61 

120 

117 
38 
70 

172 
30 
20 
25 



Old. 



12 



20 



Total. 



122 
90 

135 
68 

120 

170 
39 
78 

184 
36 
26 
45 



La- 
trines 
under 

con- 
struc- 
tion. 



149 

61 
286 
144 
159 
288 
38 
35 
23 
29 
22 



SUMMARY. 

Until June 30, 1920, work was carried on only in the above-mentioned barrios. As a summary it may be 
stated that — 

Were approved new latrines constructed 973 

Were approved as good old latrines 140 

Were under construction, latrines ....*..........'." 1 234 

TYPHOID FEVER. 

The morbidity and mortality from typhoid fever are more or less the same this year 
as last, as is shown below: 



Year. 


Morbidity. 


MortaUty.. 


1918-19 


239 
219 


102: 
107. 


1919-20 





128 



REPORT OF THE GOVERITOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Twenty cases less have been reported in the present year and at the same time five 
deaths more than the year before have occurred. 
The towns with the greatest number of cases are the following-: 



Carolina 

San Juan 

Aguadilla 

Ponce 

TrujilloAlto.. 



Guayama 

RioPiedras.. 
Santa Isabel. 
Guanica , 



11 
11 
8 
8 



The cause of the epidemic outbreak in Carolina has been attributed to the water of 
the Rio Grande of Loiza. The poor classes, especially, found themselves obliged to 
use this water in the dry season without taking any precaution whatever. This river 
passes by Trujillo Alto, where formerly there had been another outbreak of the same 
disease. The samples of water and milk which were taken gave a negative result 
in the analysis. 

P^In San Juan the 29 cases reported occurred in the 12 months of the year and there 
was never more than four cases in a month, which, considering the population of the 
city and other circumstances, is not extraordinary. It looks as though the contagion 
here has been carried by flies, of which there is a great abundance owing to the situa- 
tion of the garbage deposit in a central place. This is confirmed by the fact that 
the greatest number of cases have occurred in Puerta de Tierra and Santurce. 

The cases in Aguadilla developed among the school children, almost all infected 
in the same manner. In accordance with the investigation practiced the conclusion 
arrived at was that the outbreak had its origin in the candies sold to the children 
before school hours or during the recesses by the ambulant sellers, because so soon as 
the sale was suppressed there were no more cases. 

With the exception of Carolina and Trujillo Alto, I believe the contagion to have 
been produced by contaminated food, not forgetting to mention again "the want of 
hygiene on the poor classes. 

As the aqueduct and sewerage systems go on being constructed and perfected, in 
measure as the towns devote a great part of their funds to the improvement of these 
two powerful modern features of hygiene, typhoid fever will gradually disappear. 

The outbreaks of this disease up to the present date have principally been over- 
come by isolation of the patients, the protection of food against the flies, the destruc- 
tion of the breeding places of flies, and the prophylactic vaccination of everybody 
exposed to the contagion. During the year 1,317 treatments were sent to different 
towns for use in antityphoid vaccination. 

SMALLPOX. 

Two cases of this disease appear in the morbidity table, one in the town of Cidra, 
the other in Toa Baja; this last was confirmed by the medical inspector of the northern 
district. Neither of the patients died. 

Systematic vaccination is carried on all over the island, and during the year which 
ended a short time ago 22,401 persons were vaccinated, according to a statement 
which is inclosed in this report elsewhere. In it the total number of vaccinations 
is classified by towns and months. 

Besides vaccine virus being sent to all the towns which ask for it when it is neces- 
sary, the department has a vaccinator who works continually in different districts 
of the island. 

This affijce often receives cards reporting smallpox. The diagnosis is not believed 
until a minute investigation has been made, and up to date all have proved to be 
chicken pox, except that in Toa Baja already indicated. 



SCARLET FEVER. 

Twenty-nine cases of this disease have been reported from the following towns: 



San Juan. . 
Bayamon.. 
JfayagueE. 

liores 

Ponce 



Yauco 

Manati 

Arroyo 

Guayama.. 
Humacao.. 



Owing to the fact that the disease has rarely been found in Porto Rico some physi- 
cUtns doubted that it was scarlet fever, but the diagnosis was confirmed in more 
than half the cases by medical oflftcers of the department of health. 



BEPOBX OF THE COMMISSIONER OP HRAT .TH. 



12a 



Table showing vaccination work performed in the different tovms of the island during th^ 

fiscal year 1919-20. 



Number. 

Aguada 796 

AguasBuenas 3,661 

Arecibo 80q 

Barceloneta 170 

Barranquitas 50 

CaboRojo 20 

Caguas 2,119 

Carolina 42 

Cidra 107 

Coamo 339 

Dorad 5 

Guayama 173 

Juana Diaz 167 

Juncos 32 

Manati 801 



Number.- 

Marlcao 426 

Maunabo 284 

Mayaguez 105 

RioPiedras 4,399 

Sabana Grande 100 

Salinas 690 

San Juan 2,971 

San Lorenzo 800 

ToaBaja 939 

TrujilloAlto 1,846 

Yabucoa 538 

Yaueo 31 



Total 22,401 



Classification by months. 



July 6,834 

August 2,627 

September 3, 146 

October 1,012 

November 388 

December 408 

January 1,007 



February 1, 210 

March 1,526 

April 1,490 

May 2,199 

June 665 



Total 22,401 



At present there is not a case in the island. 



MEASLES. 



This disease, that sometimes is presented in the form of an epidemic, as in the years 
1916-17 and 1917-18, frequently acquiring great virulence, owing to pulmonary and 
gastric-intestinal complications, during the present year has only a record of 120 
cases reported and 19 deaths. The reason why more cases did not occur must be 
surely the immunity acquired through recent epidemics. 



DIPHTHERIA, 



In the general statistical report of morbidity and mortality in Porto Rico appear 
146 cases of diphtheria with 59 deaths, against 115 and 53, respectively, in the pre- 
vious year. The towns that show more cases are San Juan with 45, Yauco with 14, 
Humacao with 10, and Mayaguez with 9. These cases have been reported scattered 
through the year. 

Owing to the measures taken each time when a case occurs, the disease has never 
become epidemic. 

It is usual to take specimens of the nasal-pharyngeal exudate, not only of people 
suffering with the disease, but also of those exposed to contagion. The department 
sends tubes properly prepared for the collection of these; at the same time the dose 
of immunizing serum is injected in those who have been round the patient. One 
hundred and ninety-six thousand units of serum have been sent to different towns 
with this purpose. 

INFLUENZA. 

A new outbreak of influenza occurred during the months of February, March, and 
April, which was mild in its character and quickly suppressed. 

Considering that the number of deaths amounted to 550, we can calculate that about 
50,000 persons were attacked. The towns in which more deaths were registered are 
the following: 



Utuado 92, 

VegaBaja 77 

Manati 34 

Ponce 29 

Aguadilla 23 



VegaAlta 23 

Rlncon 23 

Isabela 19 

Aibonito 16 

Corozal 16 



None of the other towns had a greater number of deaths than 15, including the city 
of San Juan. 



130 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS EPIDEMIC. 

Foifr cases of this disease have been recorded the last year — one in Carolina and 
three in San Juan. All died. 

The case in Carolina was reported by Dr. Bird, the municipal commissioner of 
health. In the sample of the blood, taken two hours after death, the intracellular 
diplococcus of Weiscnselbaum was discovered. 

One of the cases of San Juan had died when the report was put in our hands and the 
intervention of the laboratory was rendered impossible. 

The other two cases were on the steamer Heffront coming from Spain. At the 
request of the United States Public Health Service they were admitted to the quar- 
antine hospital. The physical examination presented a typical symptomatology in 
which predominated the cervical opisthotonos and the Kermg sign, a diagnosis which 
was confirmed by the laboratory. 

Both patients died — one in a week, the other '52 days after being admitted to the 
hospital. 

WHOOPING COUGH. 

The total number of cases reported this year was 105, iagainst 91 the previous year. 
The number of deaths was 59, against 91. 

INFANTILE TETANUS. 



This disease will continue its ravages until it is possible to improve the conditions 
of the attendance of the newborn child. To this must be added the traditional cus- 
tom, even in the upper classes, to use the services of a poorly qualified midwife, who 
has not the remotest idea of the rules of asepsia. 

The insular board of health recently approved a regulation regarding the preven- 
tion of infantile tetanus. This regulation provides that sanitary packets be distributed 
containing the indispensable necessaries with which to treat the child immediately 
it is bom, so that it may not become infected. 

The commissioner of health asked for an appropriation of $5,000 for this purpose, 
but it was not possible to obtain it. Each municipality should pay well-qualified 
midwives, who should assist poor mothers. 

The following are the statistics showing the mortality from infantile tetanus in the 
last five years in Porto Rico. 

1915-16 729 I 1918-19 600 

1916-17 677 1919-20 552 

1917-18 580 I 

Quarantine Hospital. 

The total number of patients admitted during the year was 58. This hospital has 
been used in furtherance of three ends: (1) To isolate cases of contagious diseases; 

(2) to observe patients on whom a previous doubtful diagnosis has b6en made; and 

(3) to study special cases chosen by the scientific investigating commission of the 
department to carry out its researches. 

The classification of the 58 cases treated is as follows: 



Framboesia 

Erysipelas 

Purufent opthalmia 

Epidemic Parotiditis 

Granuloma pudenda 

Typhoid fever 

For treatment against rabies.. 

Measles 

Leprosy 



Chickenpox 

Diphthena 

Influenza 

Epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis 

Tubercular meningitis 

Suspicious cases of transmisible diseases not 
confirmed 



Total., 



58 



Leper Colont. 



On several occasions I have called attention to the sufferings to which the unhappy 

Eatients confined in this colony are subject, besides those proper of their malady, 
ecause of the nature of the place and owing also to the poor state of the buildings 
which are Used, already ruinous, lacking necessarv conveniences, in spite of the fact 
that the department has tried to remedy these defects as far as it can. 

It is just to state that the Legislature of Porto Rico, understanding the necessity to 
improve the conditions of these unfortunate patients, approved on June 24, 1919, 
Act No. 76 for the creation of a leper asylum and for the isolation of the lepers of the 
island. 



BBFOBI OF THE COIIMISSIOHEB OF HEALTH. 



131 



This act makes the necessary provisions for the construction of pavilions for the 
patients and for the personnel, in any adequate place which the leper asylum board, 
created by the said act, may select in any part of the island. 

It only remains for me to recommend that, as soon as circumstances permit it, all 
the necessary steps should be taken so that the lepers of Porto Rico may enjoy a better 
lodging. 

The following is the classification of the patients there confined on June 30, 1920: 



By sexes: 
Males.... 
Females. 



By races: 
White.., 
Colored., 



By ages: 

From 1 to 15 years... 
From 15 to 25 years.. 
From 25 to 30 years.. 
From 30 to 40 years.. 
From 40 to 50 years.. 
From 50 to 60 years.. 
From 60 to 75 years. . 



33 

18 
15 

33 

1 

10 
10 
2 
3 
2 
5 



By towns: 

Aguadilla 

Bayamon 

Humacao 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

San Juan 

Vega Baja 

Anasco 

Guayama 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Rio Grande... 
TrujiUoAlto.. 



2 
1 

1 
2 
5 
11 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 



Total. 



Biological Laboratory. 

Table showing the total number and Icinds of analyses made in the biological laboratory 
during the fiscal year ended June SO, 1920. 



Positive. 



Negative. 



Total. 



Hematological examination: 
Human blood- 
Malaria 

Malaria Plasmodium vivax 

Malaria Plasmodium falciparum 

Malaria Plasmodium vivax y falciparum 

Malaria Plasmodium malaria 

Investigation for bacterias 

F ilaria 

DifTerential count 

Leucocytic count ^ 

Serum diagnosis: 

Typhoid fever ( Widal) 

Typhoid fever (incomplete) 

Syphilis (Wassermann) 

Serum reaction: Glanders 

Blood of domestic animals: Anthrax 

Chemical and microscopical examination: 

Urme 

Human milk 

Transudates, exudates, and secretions: 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 

Nasal exudate from cow (Koch) 

Sputum (pneumococcus) 

Pus-empiema, determination of microorganisms. . 

Leprosy 

Diphtheria 

Pseudo-diphtheria 

Uretral exudate (gonococcus) 

Exudate from the external ear 

Nasal-pharyngeal exudate 

Investigation for meningococcus: 

Cerebrospinal fluid 

Perispherical blood 

Hemoculture w 

Bacteriological examination: 

Water 

Cow milk 

Cow milk (Eberth bacillus) 

Tuberculine, Von Pirquet reaction 

Pathological cuts, microtomic sections 

Parasacharomysis Ashfordi 

Feces, intestinal parasites: 

Tricocephalus 

Uncinaria 

Uncinaria and trichocephalus 



555 

556 

18 

5 



101 

73 

468 

3 

1 



526 
..... 



1 
..... 

108 
27 
51 



3,233 



265 



325 
3 



505 
1 



2 

184 



3,233 

555 

556 

18 

5 

1 

16 
34 
12 

366 
73 

793 
6 
1 

814 
1 

1,031 

1 

1 

8 

466 

18 

41 

1 

22 

5 

1 

22 

41 
2 
9 

1 



292 
27 
51 



132 



KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table showing the total number and kinds of analyses made in the biological laboratory 
during the fiscal year ended June SO, 1920 — Continued. 



Positive. 



Negative. 



Total. 



Feoes, intestinal parasites^Continued. 

Ascarides , 

Ascarides and trichocephalus , 

Ascarides and uncinaria 

Ascarides, uncinaria and trichocephalus 

Ascarides, uncinaria, and anguillulas , 

Anguillulas 

Anguillulas, uncinaria, and trichocephalus 

Bilharzia 

Bilharzia and trichocephalus 

Bilharzia, uncinaria, and trichocephalus 

Anguillula and trichocephalus 

Cerchomona 

Lamblia intestinalis 

Samples returned y. . 



27 
13 
6 
11 
1 
3 
4 
2 
3 
2 
6 
2 
1 
218 



Total. 



2,704 



4,984 



8,822 



Positive 


SUMMARY. 


2,704 


N^ative 




4,984 


Not classified 




.... 916 


Samples returned 




218 




, 




Total 


8,822 


Species: 

Mus ducimianus 


Rat examination at San Juan, P. R. 


Negative. 
1,422 


Alexandrinus 




701 


Ratus- 




353 


Mice 




365 


• 
Total 




2.841 



Biological Laboratory. 

List of towns which have sent samples for analyses to determine transmissible diseases 
during the fiscal year 1919-20. 
(Omitted.) 

Chemical Laboratory. 

The chemical laboratory goes on practicing all the duties of an insular laboratory. 
Analyses have been made for all branches of the Government and practically for every 
one of the commissioners of health and charities of the 76 towns of the island. 

Physical, chemical, and chemico-biological investigations have been made, exam- 
ining man^ samples of different nature, such as samples of milk and its products, 
fats and oils, cereals, grains, saccharine products, preserved fruits, cooling drinks, 
denaturalized products, meats, canned vegetables, waters, medicines, etc. Some of 
these investigations have been made in connection with certain judicial proceedings. 

The total number of analyses performed during the year may be classified by the 
results as follows: 



ExceUent 159 

Good 258 

Fair (regular) 347 

Inferior 110 

Susidcious 39 

Adulterated 264 



Poor 103 

Positive 17 

Negative 30 

Without classification 140 



Total 1,450 



From these 1,456 samples 832 were of cow milk. The result of the analyses prac- 
ticed are as follows: 



Without classification 62 

Adulterated i 222 



ExceUent 159 

Good 70 

Fair 224 

Inferior 67 Total 833 

Suspioioiu 38 

1 The percentage of adulteration this year, 26.68, compared with that of last year, 26.30, is a little higher. 



EEPOBT OP THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



133 



The following table shows the towns which have sent samples of cow milk for analy- 
sis and the number of samples which resulted adulterated from each. A comparison 
is made with the previous year: 





Year 1918-19. 


Year 1919-20. 


Towns. 


Total. 


Adulter- 
ated. 


Percent- 
age. 


Total. 


Adulter- 
ated. 


Percent- 
age, 


Adjiintas 


16 
64 
3 

39 

8 

52 

30 

35 

4 

8 

3 

26 


5 

12 

1 

10 
2 
9 
6 
3 


31.25 

18.00 

33.33 

26.00 

25 

17 

20 

6 








Apuadilla 


21 


3 


14.28 


Aibonito.. 




Arecibo 


27 

1 

25 

22 

1 

1 


5 
1 
6 
3 


18.52 


Arroyo 


100.00 


Bayamon 


24.00 


Cabo Rojo 


13.63 


Caguas . 




Camuy 






Carolina.. 


2 
3 

2 


25 

100.00 

8.00 






Cayey 


4 
12 
3 
2 


3 


76.00 


Ciales 




Cidra 


3 


100.00 


Comerio 










Corozal . . 


4 

5 
12 
57 

2 

2 

5 

1 

6 
15 

2 

1 

1 
34 
130 
52 
28 

5 

5 
44 
160 

3 
16 

1 

1 

5 
22 

4 

7' 
14 

3 

1 


1 
1 
3 
6 


25.00 
20.00 
25.00 
14.00 






Fajardo 








Guanica 


3 
4 

2 


3 


100.00 


Guavama 




Gurabo 


2 


100.00 


Hatillo . 








Gumacao . 












Isabela . . . 


1 
1 

1 
1 


100.00 
16.50 
6.66 
50.00 


3 
3 
4 






Juana Diaz 


1 


33.33 


Juncos 




Lajas . 






Lares 








Las Marias . 






4 

1 

57 

191 

52 






Manati 


2 
68 
27 

6 


7.00 
52.00 
54.00 
22.00, 
80.00 






Mayaguez 


28 
60 
5 


49.11 


Ponce 


31.40 


Rio Piedras 


9.61 


Sabana Grande 




Salinas 








San German 


15 
24 
3 
5 


36.00 
14.00 
100.00 
31.22 


9 
291 


8 
61 


88.88 


San Juan 


20.96 


San Lorenzo 




San Sebastian 


::::::::::::::::::: 




Toa Alta 








TrujllloAlto 












XJtuado 


2 
6 
2 


40.66 
27.32 
50.00 


6 
2 
17 


1 


16.66 


Vega Alta 




Vega Baja 


3 


17.64 


Vieques 




Yauco 


2 


14.28 


49 


15 


30.61 


Base Hospital 




Laboratory 






1 




Quarantine Hospital 






1 
1 
13 






Insane Asylum 









1 
10 


100.00 


Food inspectors 


41 


21 


51.22 


77.00 








Total 


977 


257 


26.30 


832 1 222 


26.68 











That table shows that, in spite of all the strenuous efforts made to prevent it, the 
adulterator continues his coward destruction of lives, Every year infant mortality 
shows a very high rate. Which is one, perhaps the most important of its causes? 
The poor quality of the milk used to feed the children. 

To repress and punish such a crime a more firm persecution and the enforcement 
of the statute relative to the matter without any indulgence are necessary. 

As soon as the chemical laboratory discovers an adulteration, the person or oflSicer 
who has sent the sample for analysis is ordered to submit the case to the competent 
tribunal, the district court. Herewith is presented a statement showine all the 
cases of adulteration of milk brought before the seven district courts of the island 
during this last year, pointing out the convictions and dismissals, the cases still 
pending, etc. 



134 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Sources of all the samples of foods, drugs, and other products examined during the 
years 1918-19 and 1919-20 by the chemical laboratory — Continued. 



Town. 


1918-19 


1919-20 


Town. 


1918-19 


1919-20 


Adjuntas 


20 




Santa Isabel 


3 

1 


2 


Aguada 


3 
24 

1 


Toa Alta 


2 


Aguadilla... 


78 


Toa Baja 


2 


'Agnas Buenas 


Trujillo Alto 


1 

11 
23 

4 
10 

1 
20 
182 




Albonito 


3 

45 
10 


Utuado 


9 


Arecibo 


36 
3 
3 

1 
32 
32 
11 
3 
1 
6 
1 
21 
4 
7 
4 


Vega Alta 


4 


Arroyo 


Vega Baja 


21 


Barcdloneta 


Vieques 


5 


Barros 


1 
62 
44 
46 
7 
8 
5 


Yabucoa 


2 


Bayamon... 


Yauco 


58 


Cabo Rojo * . 


Treasurer of Porto Rico 

Porto Rico Drug Co., San 
Juan 


74 


Caguas 




Camuy 


9 


Carolina 


Porto Rico Drug Co^ Ponce. . 




4 


Cayey 


J. M. Blanco & Co., San Juan. 
Occidental Medicine Co., 
Arecibo 




11 


Ceiba 






Ciales 


40 


3 


Cidra 


C. Fernandez & Co., San Juan. 
Rivero & Co., San Juan 




3 


Coamo .. 


1 




3 


Comerio 


R. Torres & Co., San Juan 




1 


Corozal 


6 


A. Mendez & Co., Aguadilla.. 




1 


Dorado 


1 
3 
1 
4 
34 
15 


Fr. Schomburg, San Juan 




4 


Fajardo 


5 


Mayor of San Juan 


2 

7 

15 

1 
1 




Guaynabo 


Base Hospital 




Guanica 


22 
58 
2 
2 
5 
3 
2 
6 
17 
2 
1 
1 
1 


Bureau of supplies, printing 
and transportation 




Guayama 




Gurabo 


Camp Las Casas 




Hatillo 


Commissioner of health 

Fernando Fernandez, Arecibo 
Manzanares Drug Co. , Caguas. 
Drs. Vidal Vilaret, Ponce 




Humacao. . . 


3 
3 


1 


Isabela 




1 


Jayuya 




1 


Juana Diaz 


i 


J. Esteves & Co. , Aguadilla. .- 




1 


Juncos 


Dr. R. U. Lange, Mayaguez.. 




1 


Lajas 


Investigating commission, de- 
partment of health 


2 

8 
5 
1 
24 
4 

266 

1 

1 




Lares 


1? 




Las Marias 


District court of Mayaguez.... 
Fiscal of San Juan 




Las Piedras 




Luquillo 


1 
2 

1 
69 
1 
3 
4 


Fiscal of Ponce 




Manati 


37 


Quarantine hospital 


1 


Maricao 


Investigating beri-beri 

Chemical laboratory (beri- 
beri) *..... 




Mayaguez 


140 
3 

1 




Moca 




Morovis 


Penitentiary 




Naguabo 


Property clerk, department of 
health 




Patilla"' 


4 
58 

2 

5 
30 
15 

7 
45 
167 

3 
21 




Ponce 


202 
3 

1 
56 


Ebrey Chemical Works, Hu- 
macao 




Quebradillas 


2 


Rio Grande... 


Insane asylum 


1 

104 
33 
37 


1 


Rio Piedras 


Food and drug inspector: 
San Juan 




Sabana Grande. 




Salinas 


3 

11 

576 

1 
3 


North district 




San German. . . 


South district 


6 




Total number of sam- 
ples examined 




San Lorenzo 


1,810 




San Sebastian 


1,456 







FoodSj drugSj and other products destroyed during the year 1919-20 on account of being 
improper for the public consumption. 



Oats, crackers packages. . 2,338 

Rice, cod. meats, beans, flour, etc. pounds. . 197,237 

OUves, pickles, sirups, etc flasks. . 267 

Candies, sweets, tea, etc boxes.. 291 

Cocoa, condensed milk, evaporated milk, 
salmon cans.. 27,927 



Mineral water, pineapple juice, sirups, 

etc bottles. . 86 

Cow milk liters. . 310 

Distilled water gallons.. 3 

Coconuts, eggs, cigars, etc 2. 339 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 

Division of Sanitary Engineering. 



135 



This year 1,404 plans for new constructions and 682 for enlargements and repairs 
have been approved. See following statement: 



Towns. 



Buildings. 



New. 



Plans 
approved. 



San Juan 

Rio Piedras...- 

Mayaguez 

Caguas 

AguasBuenas. 

Bayamon 

Gurabo 

Ponce 

Aibonito 

Camuy 

VegaBaja 

Aguadilla 

CaboRojo 



Total. . , 
Other towns. . 



Urbanizations 

Sewerage systems.. 
Other plans 



Total. 



426 
158 
104 
58 
33 
33 
30 
27 



415 



1,404 



171 
53 
59 
28 
4 
30 
18 
13 
16 



431 
251 



597 
211 
163 
86 
37 
63 
48 
40 
45 
34 
31 
35 
30 



1,420 
666 



2,086 
11 
2 



2,197 



The towns in which the number of plans do not amount to 20 are not placed in the 
above list. In the careful inspection made in all buildings, preference was given to 
those of moving-picture shows and theaters, thus guarding both the health and safety 
of the people. 

PLUMBING. 

On the next page appears a statement showing all the installations made in Porto 
Rico during this year 1919-20 with the approval of the department of health after 
having examined and accepted the plans. One thousand and ninety-two plans have 
been approved, only 99 were rejected, and the total of fixtures amounts to 4,464. A 
diagram is inclosed on this subject comparing month by month this fiscal year with the 
past. 

The plumbing inspectors of the northern and southern districts practiced 2,312 
inspections. 

The examining board of plumbers held examinations in San Juan and Ponce; 55 
candidates* were approved and received licenses as master plumbers. Inmates of 
the Boys' Charity School of Santurce were not admitted to the examinations, as had 
been done previously, owing to the fact that by a recent act of the legislature, ap- 
proved in 1919, the age of admission was fixed without any exception at 21 years. 
This practically has annulled the teaching of the plumbing trade which had been a 
success in the said school, where it is tried to prepare the boys to gain a living easily 
when they go out into the world. I think that the law should be amended permit- 
ting, as before, exception in favor of the pupils of the Boys' Charity School so that 
they may get their licenses as master plumbers and not allow the instruction in this 
useful trade to decay. 



136 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table showing number of sanitary plumbing installations made during the fiscal year 

1919-20. 





Plans. 


Total 
number 
of plans 
exam- 
ined. 


Fixtures approved. 




Months. 


Ap. 
proved. 


Rejected. 


Lava- 
tory and 
kitchen. 


Water 
closets. 


Bath 
tubs. 


Other 
fixtures. 


Total. 


July 


104 
128 
101 
82 
70 
101 
76 
93 
96 
72 
100 
70 


13 
6 
5 
3 
6 
4 
4 
9 
7 
12 
25 
5 


117 
134 
106 

85 

76 
105 

79 
102 
103 

84 
125 

75 


162 
222 
142 
108 
108 
191 
108 
97 
155 
117 
174 
135 


121 
172 
118 
86 
82 
134 
117 
94 
125 
63 
92 
135 


84 
115 
79 
71 
56 
85 
53 
65 
84 
75 
116 
75 


141 
65 
27 
23 
22 
48 
46 
32 
32 
27 
46 
39 


408 


August 


574 


September 


366 


October 


288 


November 


268 


December 


458 


January 


374 


February 


288 


}J(HTQh... 


396 


April 


282 


B&r:.:.:::::::::::::: 


428 


June 


384 






Total 


1,092 


99 


1,191 


1,719 


1,339 


958 


448 


4,464 







WORKMEN S SUBURBS. 

Act No. 28, approved on November 20, 1917, provides that on land belonging to 
the people of Porto Rico, in any municipality, the commissioner of the interior is 
directed to build houses in order to furnish adequate habitations to artisans, laborers, 
and other working men at a reasonable cost. 

The houses shall be constructed and maintained in accordance with the sanitary 
laws, rules, and regulations, now or hereafter in force, and they shall be rented, 
oi)erated, and maintained in accordance with rules and regulations, not in conflict 
with the law, adopted by the homestead commission. 

In this way in the neighborhood of San Juan a workmen's suburb is constructed. 
Aguadilla can boast of hers, raised with the assistance of the municipality, the 
American Red Cross, and other private subscriptions. Probably another will soon 
be begun in Arecibo. 

The department of health sees that these suburbs are built with all the necessary 
modem conveniences, such as water works, electric light, etc., whenever possible. 

DISPOSAL OP THE GARBAGE OF SAN JUAN. 

The garbage of this municipality is increasing considerably and rapidly, doubtless 
owing to the immense development of Santurce. The present deposit of garbage, 
the place where it is burned, now in Puerta de Tierra, Stop 8, constitutes an enor- 
mous breeding place for flies, an imminent danger to the public health, at the very 
doors of the most important city of Porto Rico, and it gives a very poor impression in 
our favor in the eyes of the numerous visitors to the capital. <• 

I believe the construction of a crematory to be every day more important, more 
urgent, to dispose of the garbage of the city in a hygienic and safe manner — garbage 
which is constantly increasing and will go on increasing still more. The municipal 
authorities are already aware of this and are making, although with some slowness, 
efforts to proceed to the erection of this necessary work. 

Meanwhile, another place is being sought to deposit and destroy the garbage, more 
proper and more distant, bearing in mind Sanitary Regulations No. 9 and 23. Among 
the places inspected one was chosen situated on the edge of the road which goes to 
Bayamon, a point 7 kilometers from San Juan and about 1 from Santurce. The gar- 
bage will be deposited not less than 15 meters distant from the road to the west. 

THE WATER-SUPPLY QUESTION. 

Another thing which, in my opinion, urgently requires immediate attention, is 
the aqueduct which has pFoved to be insufficient to supply the most necessary of 
liquids to meet the indispensable hygienic necessities of a city which numbers a pop- 
ulation of 70,707 inhabitants. I think that instead of enlarging it, the municipality 
of San Juan should try to get and assign a sum sufficient for the construction of a new 
waterworks system, obtaining the water from a larger river than the Piedras River, 
the scanty current of which is, it is alleged, the cause of the terrible crisis of want of 
water we have experienced during the last few weeks. 



BEPORT OP THE COMMISSIONBB OP HEALTH. 137 

WATERWORKS AND SEWERAGE SYSTEMS IN OTHER TOWNS. 

Thisyear the sewerage systems of Yauco and Rio Piedras were finished and put into 
use. This will greatly improve the conditions of the sanitary installations, especially 
those of the last-mentioned town, where the soil is little porous and the cesspools have 
given very unsatisfactory results. 

In the next page appears a map of the Island of Porto Rico showing the towns which 
have waterworks and sewerage systems, those that have only waterworks, and those 
that have neither. (Map omitted. On file in B...eau of Insular Affairs.) 

If this map is carefully studied, it may be observed: 

1. That only 9 towns have both waterworks and sewerage systems, some of these 
small towns, figuring only in this number one or two large and important ones. 

2. That 33 have waterworks but no sewerage systems. In some large and impor- 
tant towns amongst them the supply of water is deficient; and 

3. That there are in Porto Rico 34 more towns which still lack both a sewerage 
system and waterworks. 

It is well known that these works are a protection against the spread of many dan- 
gerous diseases, such as typhoid fever and others. These municipalities should con- . 
sider this, because it affects the public health, which must be protected and make 
«very effort possible to obtain the necessary funds to promote these improvements, 
very urgent and in the highest degree necessary. 

GENERAL SANITARY INSPECTION. 

When the new municipal law took effect, a little more than eight months ago, the 
local health officers who were appointed by the commissioner of health of Porto Rico, 
to which they were directly subordinate in all their official functions, were substituted 
by the municipal commissioners of health and charity, elected by the municipal 
assemblies. The department of health was in this way deprived of the services of 
a great part of its competent personnel, who were doing excellent work and render- 
ing efficient returns. 

The consequences of this event have been clearly exposed already in the first sec- 
tion of this report where the present organization of the department of health is dis- 
cussed. 

In spite of the difficulties created by this fundamental alteration in the system 
the department, thanks to its continued efforts, has performed a very active and 
thorough sanitary inspection of the island, if the reduced personnel that remained 
to do this work is considered; two medical inspectors, one for the northern district, 
the other for the southern district; three food and drug inspectors; three veterinary 
inspectors; and two plumbing inspectors. 

It is regrettable to state that the reports of these officials show that Porto Rico has 
lost much in health during these months. The sanitary condition of the island is 
not equal to what it was a year ago. We can not do less than frankly expose facts as 
they are and hide none of them, before we completely lose the efficiency acquired in 
« eight or nine years of hard and constant endeavors, so that the remedy may be appHed 
on time. 

In many towns the stores, groceries, caf^s, restaurants, hotels, bakeries, milk stalls, 
meat stalls, and other public establishments, which before were in good sanitary con- 
dition, exhibit a very poor showing to-day. Cases have been presented by the 
medical inspectors wMch, in view of the many deficiencies noticed, have requested 
the department to close the establishments up. 

In others the very dependencies of the municipality, such as slaughterhouses, 
prisons, and hospitals, present important deficiencies. Other services, such as those 
of charity and removal of garbage, are badlj^ performed. 

Very little attention do the local authorities devote to the inspection of food, espe- 
cially of milk, not being careful that the qualit)^ of such things which are on public 
sale should be of the best, the department having received numberless complaints 
on this account from many people. 

Sometimes the local officers send samples they have collected to the chemical 
laboratory for analysis; but in most cases, in spite of adulteration having been proved 
by the analysis, the adulterators have not been prosecuted. 

Take, for example, the city of San Juan, where the quality of milk has been the 
subject of so much complaint. During the past nine months the chemical laboratory 
proved adulteration in 41 samples of milk collected by the local health officers, and 
up to this date only 16 cases have been prosecuted, and in 25, more than 50 per cent, 
nothing has yet been done. 

In making an Inspection in some towns, we have found that bread was being sold 
without wrapping, in violation of the sanitary regulations. 

And in this way it would be feasible to enumerate many other failures to comply 
with sanitary regulations; but we could expect nothing better when handing to the 



138 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



municipalities, many of them lacking the necessary resources, the sanitation service 
which requires special attention and competent personnel; now they can not even 
attend another work already in their charge, that of charities. 

Charitable Institutions, 
insane asylum. 

The total number of inmates of the insane asylum during this year amounts to 
671 , composed of 475 patients remaining on June 30, 1919, and 196 who have been 
admitted at various times since; deducting 183 discharged for one cause or another, 
on June 30, 1920, there were 488 patients. 

If we go back to the year 1915 and examine the past five years which ended on 
June 30 of the present year we notice a gradual increase in the admissions of patients 
which is accounted as follows: 



Fiscal year. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


1915-16 


46 
99 
167 
lf3 
99 


37 
65 
90 
116 
97 


83 


191&-17 


164 


1917-18 


257 


1918-19 


269 


1919-20 


196 






Total 


564 


405 


969 







This fact might be estimated as the consequence of an increase in the cases of 
psicosis during that lapse in Porto Rico, but not having on this particular point any 
certain information, such as the census of insane persons in the island on which we 
can ground our data we must necessarily disregard such an estimate. I think the 
reason is more likely otherwise. The year 1915 marks exactly the beginning of the 
era of reforms initiated by this depirtraent not long after it took charge of the insti- 
tution. Since then the capacity of the building has increased and there has been 
more .svmpathy in helping the poor insane, secluding and treating them. 

A falling off can be ooserv^ei ia this yeir. It is owing to the fact that in the former 
years 1918-19, which shows the greatest figure, the maximum of capacity was reached. 
The conditions of the establishment now are such that they do not permit a larger 
number of patients; on the contrary, it will have to be reduced if the necessary repairs 
are not made in the shortest possible time. 

That is the reason why we asked on several occasions, and shall continue asking, 
for improvements and repairs in the building now occupied by the insane asylum, 
already unserviceable and inadequate, on the understanding that it be made more 
commodious to avoid the crowdi-^g together of the patients, which is harmful. This, 
as a temporary measure, while the new building is being constructed, with all the 
conveniences which all modern establishments of this doss enjoy. This work must 
be begun soon, the sooner the better, for a great need which is necessary to remedy 
demands it. 

There has been no epidemic among the patients confined in the asylum during the 
past year, as the influenza which appeared during the month of March was of a mild 
form and was quickly suppressed. The death rate was low compared with previous 
years, being 9.49 per cent, caused by deaths from several diseases. 

The patients have received the most scientific treatment possible in accordance 
with the means the asylum has at its disposal. Preference has been given to hydro- 
therapeutics, to prolonged hot baths, and the keeping in bed of the naost acute cases. 
Drugs have been administered to comply with symptomatic indications. Some 
well-known medicines have been used as tonics. Medical treatment with iodine 
and mercury has been prescribed for luetic patients with every care counseled by 
experience m the doses. 

The laboratory of electrotherapeutics, lately installed, is being employed in the 
treatment of the patients. The biological and chemical laboratories of the depart- 
ment of health are constantly resorted to in order to discover and prove diagnosis. 

With the valuable and generous cooperation of other medical professors, the fol- 
lowing major surgical operations were performed: Hysteropexia, 1; hysterotomy, 1; 
hernia, 1; uterine prolapsus, 1. 

The work which is being done in the old courtyard has been completed and has 
been converted into an ample and cool recreation ground for the use of the patients. 

The expenses for the maintenance of the patients and employees have been fixed 
at the rate of 30 cents a head. Inside this margin the food has been good because it 
is well selected and carefully cooked. There is variety in the meals. However, it 



BEFOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF HEALTH. 



139 



isjproper to state that this amount of 30 cents does permit sometimes diets of milk 
and eggs which the physicians prescribe in some cases, especially in this time when 
prices are so high. 

Comparative table showing the number of patients admitted to the insane asylum during 
the fiscal years 1918-19 and 1919-20. 



Months. 





1918-19 






1919-20 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males 


Females. 


Total. 


10 


5 


15 


8 


12 


20 


17 


8 


25 


10 


3 


13 


12 


8 


20 


6 


11 


17 


15 


11 


26 


4 


7 


11 


7 


5 


12 


9 


7 


16 


12 


1 


13 


11 


13 


24 


17 


4 


21 


9 


5 


14 


6 


7 


13 


8 


4 


12 


6 


27 


33 


9 


7 


16 


10 


20 


30 


12 


11 


23 


15 


8 


23 


5 


9 


14 


26 


12 


38 


8 


8 


16 


153 


116 


269 


99 


97 


196 



July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December. . 

January 

February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Tot:.l 



Comparative table showing the number of patients admitted and discharged during the 

fiscal years 1919-20. 



Towns. 


Remaining 

on June 30, 

1919. 


Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Remaining 

on June 30, 

1920. 


Adjimtas 


2 
2 

21 
7 
1 
3 

23 
2 
2 
4 

18 






2 


Aguada 




1 

4 
2 
1 
3 

7 


1 


Aguadilla 




17 


Aguas Buenas 


2 


7 


Aibonito 




Anasco 


1 
9 

1 


1 


Arocibo 


25 


Arroyo . 


3 


Barceionota » 


1 
3 
6 


1 


Barranquitas 


1 
5 

1 
2 
1 
6 
6 
4 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 


2 


Bavamon 


17 


Barros 


1 


C abo Rojo 


2 

3 

6 

12 

15 


1 
* 3 


3 


Camuy 


1 


Carolina 


12 


Caguas 


4 
5 


14 


Cavev 


14 


ceTbi::.::. .::::::::::::::::::::::. ::..:::::::::::.:.:: 


1 


Ciales 


3 


2 
1 
3 


3 


Cidra .... ... 


2 


Coamo 


7 
6 


5 


Comerio 


8 


Corozal .* 


1 


2 


D orad o 


2 

10 

9 


2 


Fajardo ... . . . . 


6 
6 

1 
1 

1 


3 
6 


13 


fruayaTTia 


9 


Guaynabo . . . 


1 


Guayanilla 


1 




2 


Gurabo 


1 




Guanica 


2 
1 
8 
4 
4 
6 
2 
2 
1 

12 
4 
1 
5 
5 
1 

19 
1 
3 
1 
6 


2 


Hatillo 


2 
3 
3 




3 


Humacao 


2 
3 


4 


Isabela 


9 


•Tuana Tiiaz, . . , . . -•-..-- 


4 


Juncos 


5 


3 
1 


8 


Lajas 


1 


Las Marias 




2 


Las Piedras 


2 
2 
7 
1 




3 


Lares 


5 
5 


9 


Loiza 


6 


Luquillo 


2 


Manati 


1 
1 


4 


Maunabo 


2 


6 


Maricao . . 


1 


Mayaguez 


1 


5 


15 


Morovis 


1 


Maguabo 


2 
1 

4 


2 


3 


Maranjito 


2 


Patillas 




10 



140 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOB OF PORTO RICO. 



Comparative table showing the number of patients admitted and discharged during the 
fiscal years 1919-20— Contmned. 



Towns. 


Remaining 

on June 30, 

1919. 


Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Remaining 

on June 30, 

1920. 


Ponce 


44 
4 
1 
7 

13 
9 
• 94 
2 
5 
1 
1 
2 
2 
5 
5 
4 
5 
2 
5 

1^ 


7 
4 


21 
5 


30 


Quebradillas . - 


3 


Rincon 


1 


Rio Grande 


1 
8 
1 
49 
2 
2 
1 
1 


2 
4 
2 

33 
3 
4 
2 
1 


6 


Rio Piedras 


17 


San German 


8 


San Juan 


110 


San Lorenzo 


1 


San Sebastian . 


3 


Santa Isabel 




Salinas 


1 


Toa-Alta 


2 


Toa-Baja 


3 
1 
3 


1 
3 


4 


TrujilloAlto 


3 


Utuado 


8 


Vega-Alta 


2 
3 

1 
3 
7 


2 


Vega-Baja 


1 
3 
5 
3 


3 


Vieques 


4 


Yabucoa 


7 


Yauco 


11 


Total 


475 


196 


183 


488 


SUMMARY. 
Males 


226 
249 


99 
97 


97 
86 


228 


Females 


260 






Total 


475 


196 


183 


488 







Age, color f civil condition^ religion, and profession of patients remaining in the insane 

asylum on June 30 j 1920. 



AGES. 

From 10 to 20 years . . 
From 21 to 30 years . . 
From 31 to 40 years.. 
From 41 to 50 years . . 
From 51 to 60 years . . 
From 61 to 70 years. . 
From 71 to 80 years. . 

Total 

COLOE. 

White 

Colored 

Total 

CIVIL CONDITION. 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unlmown 

Total 

BEUOION. 

Catholic 

Evangelist 

Presbyterians 

Protestants 

Without any 

Unknown 

Total 

PROFESSION. 

Farmer 

Mason 



Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Total. 


11 


10 


21 


67 


52 


119 


71 


84 


155 


45 


62 


107 


25 


40 


65 


8 


11 


19 


1 


1 


2 


228 


260 


488 


148 


163 


311 


80 


97 


177 


228 


260 


488 


151 


140 


291 


63 


82 


145 


5 


30 


35 


2 


3 


5 


7 


6 


12 


228 


280 


488 


190 


221 


411 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


7 


7 


14 


6 




8 


23 


31 


54 


228 


280 


488 


29 


3 


32 


2 




2 



PROFESSION— continued . 



Barber 

Worlonan.. 
Carpenter.. 
Merchant . . 
Cartman . . , 
Cook 



Domestic . 

Employees 

Student 

Fireman 

Blacksmith 

Prhiter 

Industrial 

Engineer 

Journeyman 

Farm laborer ». 

Laundress 

Messenger 

Physician 

Mechanic 

Foreman 

Teacher 

MiUtary 

Nurse girl 

Laborer 

Baker 

Ironworker 

Painter 

Insular police 

Unskilled laborer.. 

Fisherman 

Tailor 

Sacristan 

Servant 

Cigarmaker 

Stenographer 

Shoemaker 

Without 

Unknown 



Total. 



Males. 



228 



Fe- 
males. 



198 
1 
6 



260 



Total. 



15 
5 
8 
1 
8 
3 
198 
7 
9 
2 
1 
2 

11 
2 

65 

12 
5 
2 
1 
4 
2 
3 
8 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

14 
1 
5 

28 

28 



488 



RBPOBT OF THE OOMMISSIONEE OF HEALTH. 



141 



Diagnosis of mental diseases of the patients of the insane asylum, during the fiscal year 

1919-20, 



Diagnosis. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Total. 


Diagnosis 


Males. 


Fe- 
males 


Total. 


ConfusioQal insanity 


3 
1 

32 
2 
4 

2 

1 

35 

6 

8 

57 

11 

28 

13 
41 


2 

37* 

5' 

i" 

19 
3 
5 

92 
2 

45 

4" 

25 
10 


5 
1 

69 
2 
9 

2 
2 

54 
9 

13 
149 

13 

73 

13 
45 
25 
40 


Hysterical insanity 




16 
3 
13 

48' 

1 


5 


Mental degeneration 


Toxic insanity...! 


4 
2 


7 


Dementia precox 

Vesanic insanity 


Traumatic insanity 

Erotic insanity 


2 
2 


Senile insanity .' 


nirnular {Ti.<;ap]^ty 




1 


Insanity due to arterio- 


Manic .". 


2 
26 

7 

4 
1 
1 
1 


6 


sclerosis 


Acute manic 


42 


Terminal dementia 


Subacute manic 


10 


Partial delirium 


Mplftnr»hnlift ..,..,.,, 


17 


Idiocy 


Menomanic .... 


1 


Imbecility 


Neurasthenia r , 


1 


Manic depressive insanity 
Syphilitic insanity 


General paralysis 

Involutional psych(^ . . . 


1 
4S 


Periodical insanity 

Psychosis due to uncina- 
riasis 


Psychosis due to pulmo- 
nar tuberculosis 




1 


Mental thrombosis 

Total 


3 


3 


Alcoholic insanity 

Puerperal insanity 




325 


346 


671 


Epileptic insanity 


30 







Diagnosis of the mental diseases of the patients of the insane asylum classified by sexes, 
and discharges occurred during the fiscal year 1919-20. 





Patients. 


Discharged. 


Be 








Males. 


Females. 




Diagnosis. 


1^ 


£ 


1 


1 


1 


s 


i 




1 


s 

1 


i 

3 
1 

28 
2 
3 
2 
1 

31 
6 
7 

39 
4 

16 
1 

30 

"24' 
..... 

2 


1 

*'32' 
..... 

..... 

17 
2 
5 

62 
1 

33 
..... 

15 
7 
3 
3 

"2* 

1 
4 
12 
3 

7 

"'A' 

1 


H 


Confusional insanity 


3 

1 

32 

2 

4 

2 

1 

35 

6 

8 

57 

11 

28 

13 

41 


2 

"37* 

"T 
..... 

19 
3 
5 

92 
2 

45 

"'l' 
25 
10 
5 
3 

""2 
1 
4 

16 
3 

13 

"48* 

1 


5 
1 

69 

2 

9 

2 

2 

54 

9 

13 

149 

13 

73 

13 

45 

25 

40 

5 

7 

2 

2 

1 

6 

42 

10 

17 

1 

1 

1 

48 

1 
3 








4 


Mental degeneration 












1 


Dementia precox 


1 


3 





1 


1 


3 


60 


Vesanic insanity 


2 


Senile insanit v 




1 










g 


Insanity due to arteriosclerosis 










2 


Terminal dementia 














2 


Partial delirium 




2 


2 






2 


48 


Idiocy 




1 


g 


Imbecilit V 






1 
5 

1 
4 

6 
9 




12 


Manic depressive insanity ". 


10 
1 

7 
5 

1 


3 
5 

1 
1 
1 


17 


5 


8 
1 
4 


101 


SvDiiilitic insanity 


5 


Periodical insanity 


5 


3 


49 


Psychosis due to uncinariasis 


1 


Alcoholic insanity 


..... 
2 


1 

3 

..... 


..... 

1 
1 


33 


Puerperal insanity 


16 


Epileptic insanity 


30 




2 


4 


81 


Hysterical insanity 


3 


Toxic insanity 


4 
2 


2 





1 




4 


Traumatic insanity 








2 


Erotic insanity 














2 


Circular insanity 


















1 


Manic 


2 

26 

7 
4 

1 
1 
1 














2 
12 
3 

4 

1 
1 
1 


5 


Acute manic 


11 
3 


2 

1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


24 


Subacute manic 


6 


Melancholia 




2 


3 


1 


11 










1 


Npiirasthenia 














1 


General paralysis 














1 


Involutional Dsychosis 










2 


3 


3 


40 


Psychosis due to pulmonary tubercu- 
losis 










1 


Mental thrombosis 


3 














3 


3 


















Total 


325 


346 


671 


41 


22 


34 


34 


22 


30 


228 


260 


488 







14748—20 ^10 



142 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Diagnosis of the psychoses, in relation with the ages, of the patients in the insane asylum 
during the fiscal year 1919-20. 





Males from — 


Females from— 


Diagnosis. 


o 

o 












8 

B 


B 

o 


B 


5* 

o 


s 

B 
55 


B 
10 








1 






1 


1 

1 
6 


.... 










1 


.... 


.1 


5 


















1 




5 


18 




.... 








20 


8 


4 








69 














2 


Senile insanity 








.... 








1 


2 


1 


1 




9 














2 


















1 
7 
1 
1 
22 








2 


Partial delirium 




6 
1 
2 
21 
5 
5 
5 
5 


13 
1 
2 

16 
3 

10 
2 

15 


11 

12 
11 


1 






3 


6 

2 

1 

32 

1 
14 


2 






64 


Idiocy 


3 

1 
2 

1 






9 


Tmhppilifv* 


11 


1 






3 

29 
1 

7 








13 


Manic denressive insanity 






3 


1 




149 


SvnhilitiP insaTiitv 






13 


Periodical insanity 


2 

1 
2 






11 


12 


1 




73 










13 












2 
9 
6 
2 
2 


"3' 
"2 


2 
1 

1 






45 










11 
2 

1 






25 




6 


9 


8 














40 












5 














1 












f7 




1 












2 
















1 






1 






2 






















1 

"2 






1 








' 




"'a' 


1 
1 








1 
5 

1 


2 
2 


1 
1 




f6 


Acute manic 




11 
3 








3 
2 


42 




10 




















1 






2 


.... 










4 


4 


2 








17 
















1 






























1 


Involutional nsychosis 


.... 
















3 

1 


18 


19 


6 


2 


48 


Psychosis due to pulmonary tubercu- 
losis 




















1 


Mental thrombosis 




1 
96 


2 




.... 





















3 


Total 


20 


94 


§4 


39 


11 


1 


19 


88 


11 


78 


46 


11 


3 


67t 











Intercurrent diseases mffered by the patients of the insane asylum during the fiscal year 

1919-20. 



Asthenia. 



Inguinal adenitis 

Bronchial asthma 

Ascarides 

Cerebral apoplexy 

Cardiac affection 

Broncho-pneumonia. . . 

Contusions 

Congestion of the lungs . . . 

Mental confusion 

Cerebral congestion 

Bronchial catarrh 

Coryza 

Cachexia 

Neryous breakdown. . . 

Dysentery 

Dysentery cardiac collapse 
Epilepsy (subintrant-ao- 



Acute enterocolitis 

Enterocolitis, dysenteric 

form , 

Stomatitis , 

Morphea 

Eczenia 

Ecxemia ^ 

Emph^ema— astlima — 

Eruption 

Fistula 

Filariasis 

FurunculosLs 

Uterine fixing 

Typhoid fever 

Oastro-enterltis 

Wounds 



Males. 



10 



Fe- 
males. 



Total. 



3 
2 

6 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
1 
111 
2 



Hysterotomy (operated).. 

Hernia (operated) 

Jaundice 

Influenza 

Infection (finger) 

Infection (foot) 

Nasal infection 

Intestinal intoxication — 

Luxation 

Valyular lesion 

Leucorrhea 

Manic depressiye in- 
sanity-syphilitic 

Metrorrhagia— cardiac col- 
lapse 

Grayid nephritis with 
eclampsia 

Intercostal neuralgia 

Otitis 

Intestinal parasites 

Oxyuris 

Paralysis 

Pneumonia 

Paralysis and chlorosis.... 

Paludism 

Pellagra 

Prolapsus of the uterus.. 

Cerebral syphilis, acute 
manic form 

Puerperal sepsis*. 

Pulmonary tuberculosis . . 

Trauma of the head 

Cerebral thrombosis 

Uncinariasis 

Ulcer 



Males. 



Fe- 
males. 



Total. 



1 

1 
1 

91 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 

1 

1 
% 
1 
1 
16 
1 



KEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



14a 



•uoTsnjuoo ib:ju9H 



^ I 



•X^nresm pK)iJ9:^Si5H 



•^^TUBSUT opcoj, 



•iC^iIpaqrai 



•xooejd VTiudmQii 



'AlTW3Sm OT^nRdif g 






I 

'I 

55 









•STSBTJBmOim 

o; enp BT:^U8ra8(i 



•iC:^nresTn ojioqootv 



•enoqoxrepH 



•^:^TTresut iBjadjan J 



•BTireni oraojiio 



•ifsdeiida 



•ranpiiep im^jBj 



•STsoqo 
-ifsd iBnoT;ntOAUi 



•i:;nresni jBOTpoiied: 



•if:jniBsiiT 
OATssojdep DBitrepi 




144 



REPOBT OP THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

BOYS* AND girls' CHARITY SCHOOLS. 



The following statement shows the number of inmates of both charitable institu- 
tions during the year which ended on June 30 last: 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Inmates on June 30, 1919. 


281 
166 


178 
139 


459 


A(lai!tted*<lurmg this year. 


305 






Total 


447 
54 


317 

18 


764 


Dischatrged during the year 


72 






Inmates on June 30, 1920...... 


393 


299 


692 







Below, the children now in the said schools are classified according to their different 



Girls. 



Total. 



5 years... 

6 years... 

7 years... 

8 years... 

9 years... 

10 years.. 

11 years.. 

12 years., 

13 years.. 

14 years., 

15 years.. 

16 years., 

17 years., 

18 years.. 



1 
1 
33 
54 
66 
109 
79 
109 
,63 
54 
46 
51 
18 



Total. 



393 



In the educational work is followed the same course of study, also the same plan of 
organization, laid down by the department of education of Porto Rico for the public 
schools. Besides the academic instruction which reaches the eighth grade, equally 
in both schools, the children receive instruction in manual arts. 

In the Boys ' Charity School there are workshops for the teaching of carpentry and 
cabinetmaking, masonry, plumbing, shoemaking, and the construction of all kinds 
of ar4;icles from cement, such as benches, flowerpots, mosaics, etc. These workshops 
were open regularljr all the year producing very efficient work. In the shoemaker's 
shop, for example, in which 60 boys worked every day, some in the morning and oth- 
ers m the afternoon, all the shoes used by the inmates were made, 1,572 pairs, at a 
cost of $2.21 per pair, which is low. Also 1,146 pairs were mended at the reduced 
cost of 33 cents per pair. 

In the Girls' Charity School sewing by machine and by hand is taught. Also 
embroidery, knitting, and drawn work, mending and darning of stockings and clothes. 
To complete this, which we may call domestic science, education for the home, the 
girls are also taught to cook. 

The statement below shows the enrollment by grades and the promotions made 
at the end of the year: 



Grade. 


Enrollment. 


Promoted. 


Not promoted. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


First: 


101 
58 
61 
53 
50 
21 
14 
23 


53 
58 
55 
53 
28 
27 
26 
20 


35 
51 
45 
45 
41 
18 
11 
23 


43 
58 
55 
51 
28 
25 
23 
20 


66 
7 

16 
8 
9 
3 
3 


10 


Second 


Third 




Fourth .• 


2 


Fifth 


Sixth 


2 
3 


Seventh 


Eighth 








Total 


381 


310 


269 


293 


112 


17 





BEPOET OF THE OOMMISSIONEB OP HEALTH. 



145 



It will be noticed that promotion was lower among the boys than among the girls. 
The changes in the Boys' Charity School have been greater than in the Girls' Charity 
School. Out of 166 boys admitted, 88 could neither read or write, 25 could read, 
and 53 knew how to read and write a little. So that nearly all were enrolled in the 
first two or three grades, most in the first, and, of course, as the entrance of these 
boys came at different times during the school course, it was not in any way possible 
that the whole result should allow a greater percentage of promotions. 

In both institutions classes in drawing and painting are established and a large 
number of pupils attend them. Much attention is given to physical exercises, part 
of each day being given to classes of gymnasium and games of basket ball, base ball, 
etc. In the Boys' Charity School the children are organized in a military corps and 
every day are drilled. 

This year, as in the previous years, the academy of music was maintained and 45 
boys, who were members of the band, practiced every day. • 

the health of the children in both schools has been very good generally during this 
year. The cases of illness have been few, almost none of serious diseases, and there 
has not been one death. 

I desire not to omit to point out that, in my judgment, certain very important works 
are necessary. One is the construction for each school of a separate building to be- 
used as an infirmary. The other is the construction of new buildings, also apart, for the 
kitchens; those used now are inadequate. 

The lavatories and laundries need enlarging and to be supplied with more machines, 
for those now existent are insuflScient. 

In the next page appears a table showing the number of inmates belonging to each 
town of the island and that which each should have according to the population and 
the capacity of each institution. 

It will be noticed that although a sufficient appropriation was made for the main- 
tenance of 450 bo^s and 350 girls, the distribution is made on the basis of 400 and 300, 
respectively. It is because there is no room for more. So I should recommend the 
enlarging of each building. 

Table showing the number of inmates in^the Boys^ and Girls^ Charity School^ the number 
from each town, and the number that equitably pertains thereto. 



Towns. 


Present 
number of 
inmates. 


Number to 

which each 

town is 

entitled. 


Excess. 


Number that 

maybe 

admitted. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


GirlF. 


Adjimtas 


4 
2 
.5 
2 
4 
6 

14 
4 
6 
5 
2 

20 
2 

10 
5 
3 
6 
3 
5 
2 
4 
4 
4 
1 
3 
7 


6 
1 
5 
2 
3 
5 
5 
2 
2 
5 
3 

13 
3 

11 
2 
3 
3 
2 
4 
2 
5 
3 
2 


6' 


6 
4 
8 
3 
4 
4 
14 
2 
4 
4 
5 
9 
7 
11 
4 
5 
7 
2 
6 
5 
5 
5 
4 
1 
2 
4 
3 
6 
4 
3 
4 
4 


5 
3 
6 
2 
3 
3 
11 
2 
4 
3 
3 
6 
5 
19 
3 
3 
5 
1 
4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
1 
2 
4 
2 
5 
3. 
3 
3 




1 


2 
2 
3 
1 




A^u&da . • - . . . 


2 


A(ruadilla 






1 


Aguas Buenas . 








Aibonito 








Anasco 


2 


2 






A recibo 




& 


Arroyo 


2 
2 
1 








Barceloneta 






2: 


Barranquitas 


2 






Barros 


3 




Bayamon 


11 


5 




Cabo Rajo 


1 


2 


Caguas 


i" 


1 




Camay 


1 


CaroJina 




2 
1 


I 


Cayey 






2 


Ceiba 


1 


1 




Ciales .. 


1 
3 

1 
1 




Cidra 






T 


Coamo 





1 


Comerio 


1 
I 


Corozal 






Cnlpbra. 








I . 


Dorado 


1 
3 






2' 


Fajerdo 


2 






Guanipa 


3 


2" 


Gnavama 


8 
1 
8 
4 
3 


5 
1 
5 
6 
1 
1 


2 







Oiiavanilla 




3 


2 


Guavnabo 


5 


2 
3 




Gurabo 






Hatillo 


1 
1 


2. 


Hormigueros 


1 I 







146 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table showing the number of inmates in the Boys' and Girls' Charity School, the number 
from each town, and the number that equitably pertains thereto— Gontmuea. 



Towns. 


Present 

number of 

inmates. 


Number to 

which each 

town is 

entitled. 


Excess. 


Number that 

may be 

admitted. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Humacao 


5 
3 
1 
3 
4 
2 
5 
3 
1 
4 
1 
4 


10 
3 

1 

3" 

2 
5 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 

10 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 

12 
1 
1 
6 
8 
1 
2 
7 

39 
5 
5 
1 
4 
6 
4 
6 
1 
5 
6 


7 
6 
4 
6 
4 
4 
8 
3 
3 
5 
2 
6 
3 
2 

13 
5 
5 
5 
3 
4 
4 

22 
3 
2 
4 
7 
4 
4 
8 

22 
6 
7 
2 
3 
2 
2 

11 
3 
5 
3 
4 
6 
8 


5 
4 
8 
4 
3 
2 
6 
2 
2 
3 
2 
5 
2 
2 
10 
3 
3 
3 


3 
3 

17 
3 
2 
3 
5 
3 
3 
5 

17 
4 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
8 
2 
4 
3 
3 
5 
6 




5 


2 
3 
3 
3 




Isabela 


2 








2 


Juana Diaz 






4 


Juncos *- 






2 
3 




Lares 






i 

1 


Las Marias 






2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
3 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 




Lolza 














i 


Maniti 






3 


Maricao 




















10 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

27 
3 
1 
5 

14 
2 
3 
6 

62 
4 
5 
2 
7 
3 
3 
7 
2 
5 
6 








Moca 






i 








2 








1 


Naranjito 




i 




Patillas 


2 


Peauelas 






1 


Ponce 


5 






2 


Rincon 


i' 


3' 


1 


1 


RioPiedras 


7 


3 


2" 

1 

2 


2 


Salinas 






1 


San German 


46' 


2 

22 

1 




San Juan 

San Lorenzo 


2 
2 








Santa Isabel 

ToaAlta 


4" 


2 


1 


ToaBaja 

TrujilloAlto 

TTtniuio 


1 
1 


2 


4* 

1 


3 


VegaAlta 

Vftpa RaiA .... 




i" 


1 


Vieques 


3 


2 


4* 

1 
4 


3 


Yahnpfta 


6 
4 


5 

1 






1 


Yauco 






5 


Total 


393 


299 















BLIND ASYLUM. 

The following statement shows the total number of patiente treated in the blind 
asylum during the fiscal year just ended: 





Curable. 


Incurable. 


Total. 




14 
92 


23 
23 


37 


Admitted durine the year 1919-20 


115 


Total 

Discharged 


106 
55 


46 
14 


152 
69 




51 


32 


83 







The discharges may be classified as follows: 

^ , 40 

Cured • — -•• 24 

Upon request (not cured) "f. 

Died ■■ 1 



Total. 



There have been performed 61 operations this year, 40 on men, 18 on women, aiid 
3 on children. Ninety-three cases of intercurrent diseases have been recorded, prin- 
cipally influenza. 



BEFOBT OF THE OOIiIMISSIOlfrEB OF HEALTH. 



147 



In the first six months, from July to December, owing to the general repairs which 
were being done on the building, which was greatly damaged by the late earthquakes, 
very few patients were admitted, being the number of inmates during such period 
of the year small. 

The part of the building used as infirmary does not provide very ^ood accommoda- 
tions. Being the only place available for an infirmary, those patients, invalid on 
account of advanced age, are secluded in it with those who are suffering from any 
prevailing disease, together with the patients who have had operations, and so it 
proves to be very small and inadequate. I think it is necessary to provide another 
place better for this purpose. 

If the necessary funds were appropriated, an enlargement could be made on the 
north side of the building for two infirmaries, to separate more especially those who 
have been operated on, with a capacity of holding each one six patients, one for men 
and the other for women. 

I suggest that another appropriation be made for two other most necessarv improve- 
ments as soon as possible. One is to build a separate house for the use of tne director 
of the establishment, now living in a part of the same building as the blind patients. 
Another is to erect a fence on the north part of the grounds of the institution. 

The legislative assembly in the session of June, 1919, created the position of teacher 
for the blind. From the report made by Miss Loaiza Cordero, who was appointed for 
the said position by the department of education, the following statements are taken: 

"The number of pupils enrolled this year has been 24. Seven were blind and 17 
were not completely blind. Only 1 pupil was enrolled during 10 months, the whole 
school year. As many of the patients of the asylum return to their homes as soon as 
they have received treatment, the enrollment was never larger than 16. 

''Braille's system is used to teach the blind to read, grade IJ, which is the universal 
system employed by Evergreen, a school for blind soldiers in Baltimore, Md., and 
also used in France, Germany, England, Spain, and South America. 

' * Five pupils have learned to write. Another, totally blind , can write with a pencil , 
making square letters. Another has learned to write on Braille's slate. As to manual 
work, the blind and half blind have learned to knit socks, to crochet, and to do straw 
work Samples of these works were shown in the exhibition of the Baldorioty de 
Castro Graded School in San Juan in December, 1919. 

''Some works were also exhibited in the regional fair of 1920." 

Porto Rico needs a school for the blind, a school where blind children can receive 
a home and education, to prepare them to be of use to themselves and their coimtry. 
We must help these unfortunate people, who up to now have been considered a bur- 
den by society and their own friends. It is my opinion that efforts should be made 
to obtain an appropriation for this charitable purpose. 

Diagnoses of patients admitted to the asylum, curable and incurable, during the fiscal year 

1919-20, 



Males. Females. Children. Total 



Amblyopia 

Atresia / 

Atrophy of 1 eye 

Atrophy of both eyes 

Papillary atrophy 

Blefaro conjunctivitis 

Cataracts 

Conjunctivitis 

Kerato-conjunctivitis 

Choroiditis 

Atrophic choroiditis 

Staphyloma of the cornea 

Coroc retinitis 

Narrowness of the lachrymal canals. 

Glaucoma 

Hemeralopia 

Hernia of the iris 

Iritis 

Irido-choroiditis 

Cicatrizant leucoma 

Nephelion or nebula 

Neuritis 

Neuro-retinitis 

Nucleated eyes 

Exophthalmic eyes 

Palpebral paresis 

Pterygium 

Keratitis 

Orbital tumor 



Total., 



55 



6 
1 
8 
3 
68 
5 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
9 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
8 
3 
1 

I49 



148 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Operations performed. 





Males. 


Females. 


Children. 


Total. 


Cataracts 


26 
4 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 


10 


1 
1 

1 


37 


Discissions 




Enucleation 


3 




Iridectomy 




Paracentesis 








Artificial pupil 


2 
3 






Pterygium 




6 








Total 


40 


18 


3 


61 







Intercurrent diseases in the asylum. 



Senile anemia 1 

Pernicious anemia 1 

Arteriosclerosis 2 

Dysentery 5 

Rheumatic endocarditis 1 

Influenza (endemic form) 40 



Neuralgia (various) 10 

Malaria 3 

Gastric troubles 30 

Total : 93 



Deaths. 



Senileanemia 1 I 

Pernicious anemia 1 

Arteriosclerosis ^ 2 



Rheumatic endocarditis. 



Total. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE OF CHABITIES. 

In 1917, when I occupied the position of assistant commissioner of health of Porto 
Rico, I visited all the towns of the island, investigating the conditions of the municipal 
service of charities. 

From my report about the subject are the following paragraphs: 

**The services rendered by the municipalities to the poor are: Medical assistance, 
medicines to the sick poor, first-aid stations (salas de socorro), help to the sick poor. 
and hospitals. 

" Medical assistance. — The work of the physician is difficult because, first, he lacks 
a list of the poor of the municipality so as to avoid that persons who are not indigent 
receive the service that are only for the needy; second, the lack of hospitals, which 
does not permit the gathering in one place of serious cases that require the constant 
care and frequent observation of the pnysicians; third, the poor conditions of the first- 
aid stations, not provided with the necessary equipment and materials, with the con- 
sequent lack of facilities to cure even the slightest wound without loss of time and 
without danger of infection; and, fomth, the meager amoimts appropriated for medi- 
cines oblige the physician to consider the cost of every prescription so that the appro- 
priation is not exhausted before the end of the year when the materials are supplied 
by administration or if supplied bj/^ contract so that the contractor does not deHver a 
smaller quantity than that prescribed or alters the formula, as it appears to occur 
frequently. These deficiencies are the reasons why the jwsition of charity physician 
(medico de beneficencia) has excessive work and with few results. 

*^ Hospitals. — The hospital conditions in Porto Rico are deplorable. The buildings 
are not suited to the ends for which they are used, nor are they fitted with the most 
essential equipment, sufficient material, nor are well attended. Everything in them 
shows poverty, filth, and carelessness. As a rule, such are the conditions of these 
charitable establishments all over the island. 

^^ First-aid stations. — In each town there is a first-aid station in general established 
in the dirtiest room of the city hall, in the alcaldia. These first-aid stations are not 
intended only to give attention to the healing of wounds and other emergency cases, 
but also to receive sick persons and to serve as a refuge for invalids. These establish- 
ments, as a rule, lack all conveniences, light, ventilation, cleanliness, means for the 
sterilization of the instruments used in tne minor operations performed, antiseptic 
material, water, etc. Very few first-aid stations are properly installed and equipped 
and well attended. 

*^ Administration of medicines. — The distribution of medicines to poor people in each 
municipality is effected either by a contractor or by the administration. By means 
of bids, the pharmacist engages to provide all the medicines prescribed by the doctor 



BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIOITER OF HEALTH. 149 

to the sick poor for the sum appropriated in the budget, except in some cases in which 
a limit of a certain number of prescriptions a day is fixed. The service in this form 
seems to be more economical for the municipality, but it has certain troubles. The 
medicines are prepared very hastily, with very little care, and as a rule are delivered 
in dirty receptacles uncovered. I'he appearance is such that sometimes the patient 
throws the medicine away instead of taking it. 

*' In regard to the quantity, the poor often go back to the doctor telling him they have 
not received what he prescribed. 

*' Malaria patients return day after day to the doctor begging for medicines and are 
never cured although quinine is prescribed in proper doses. For these reasons the 
poor have lost faith in the medicines provided them. 

''When the supplying of medicines is done by the administration the local drug 
stores, if the municipality has not its own pharmacy, prepare the prescriptions author- 
ized or approved by the mayor at the regular prices, but in this way the appropriation 
is soon exhausted." 

And what was said then can be repeated now. Although three years have ^one by 
the conditions under which the municipal service of charity is rendered have altered 
very little. In a large number of towns it is worse than before. There is a widespread 
negligence for the sufferings of our people. Much of the population is born, grows up, 
and dies without having received any or scarcely any medical assistance. 

The country people of Porto Rico almost everywhere have no help from science in 
their hours of pain and danger from illness, the result being many premature deaths, 
unnecessary, completely avoidable. 

Good will is not wanting, the kindly feeling of the physician is of no avail. He too 
is a victim of the present state of things. He can not adequately attend to such a 
countless number of persons without adequate means nor those of surgery in such an 
environment as the homes of the poor can show without medicines. He receives 
a meager pay. 

And neither do the richer class receive proper treatment in conformity with the 
most up-to-date principles. 

So I recommend the organization of an insular service of charities with the estab- 
lishment of insular hospitals, beginning with one if means do not permit more, 
erecting the rest in various parts of the island as circumstances may permit. 



150 



BEPOBT OF THE GOVEENOR OF POBTO BICO. 



•Is 



1 



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^ ^ 



BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HBAIiTH. 



151 






gt-HOOiOCOO 
lO CC 00 O 00 CO 



•eiBinaj: 



05 1-H CO CO .-< i-i 



•8IBK 






eqi^Tj<coo(M 









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CS CO 05 00 «0 f-H 



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152 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



7i 

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BEPOET OP THE COMMISSIONER OP HEALTH, 



153 



SSacsSeo 
t>- CO Oi io <N -^ 



Scooooroc? 



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gQ00CO«DT 



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2 



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mjts Q\\i JO sasBasiQ 'IIIA 



00 CO CO O) U^ CO 



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JO sasBasip iBajanaAuof^ 'ja 



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CO OO CO t*» O CO 



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sooggeocj 



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subSjo aq:; jo pire "raa^Sifs 
snoAjeu oq:^ jo sasBasiQ 'n 



CO ifi 00 «o «6 »o 



•sasT3asip iBjanao 'i 



5»-Ht>.C0b-« 

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154 



KEPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



•I 

d 

1 

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1 






4 



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rH^ eo CO 


•J9A9J MonaA '91 














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CO f-( r-t tH 


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INCSI 00 M 


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252 s 


1 




i 

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First semester, 1919: 

July 

August 

September 

October 


November : 

December 

Total 


Second semester, 1920: 

January 

February 

March 

April 


May 

June 

Total 


8 

i 





BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



165 



2 

1 

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156 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 





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JO sireljo 911^ JO sjoimi:^ :>iren 
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BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



157 



1 




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14748—20 11 



158 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERKOK OF PORTO RICO. 





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4 



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l?2 




REPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEE OF HEALTH. 



159 



•(p8:^d90X9 sisoinojaqn^ 
puB J90UB0) raaisXs 9Ai:jsa3 
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i-i -JO CO 



05 C005 1C oa> 



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911% JO jouim PT^^P^H "ZTT 



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160 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 






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EEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF HEALTH. 



161 



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162 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



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1,991 
2,508 
2,209 
2,432 


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2.361 
2,818 
2,615 
2,386 
2,336 


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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



163 






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164 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



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BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



165 









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166 



KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 






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of the 

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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



167 



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168 



BEPOET OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 







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pill 1:111 1 





KEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



169 



»-l^>t^«(N^^lO(^^oo^locc'«*'ai"<*^■<!ro'OTIi:j30lC(Nc«lScco^r^|f>.5C(^l^ 



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170 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 









JO sasBasip o]we2io 



^1 



•niG^SiCs snoAjan 
9Tt:^ JO sas^esip iBVj'JO 



•J^9 8q!J JO sasBasTQ 



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BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



171 



.(M^ .e^ . . .,-(C« 



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Pi; P- tt cz. c^ CO Aa:c/j:tHH^^>>;^>-'>' 






172 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 





•Ib;o; POBJO 


;SS5S^^§52^^^gS?g^^^j^S§^?5?5222g^^:^ 


■2» 


•paugap-inaopog 
-pads )on q:^B9p jo esnBO 


r-ITr(N '. 1-H !C^ IcO • • -r-HC^ItNCO • • 'TTr-l '- !(N-«tirHrH '. 


•S9SB0 

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::::::: :^ :::: : 






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::::: :^ ::•:;: : 




•snjng 1 :: :^ :::::::;: : 


:::::::;: i-^ :: : 


•uoT^BTHJojiBui iB:^ni83uoo 1 ::::::;::;:::: 


:::::: :^ ::::: : 




•sT;n9nno9!^sa ;::::::::::::: 




•BX9iraB 

pUB UpiS 9q:jJ0 S9SB9STa 






Diseases 
of the 
genito- 
urinary 
organs. 


•siC9npp[9q:^jos9SB9STa ::::::::::;::: 


::::::::'-'::::: 


•ST^^Tjqdan 9:jnoy 


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>> 
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:::::::::::::: 
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; 1 ; i(N 1 ! ; 1 ! ; I ; I 


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::::::::: :^ :: : 


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•Bnioum9uj 


^ : : : : : : ;^^t^^(M ; 


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•Bnioum9nd-oqonoaa 


t-H rf CO j '. CO lO ^ '• '• j CO 1 -^ 


^ '. ^ ', l> ^ ^ CM (N .-1 CO '• T-i .-• 


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>> 

IS 


Adjuntas 

Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Aguas Buenas 

Aibonito 

Anasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta 

Barranquitas 

Bayamon 

CaboRojo • 

Caguas 


Camuy 

Carolina 

Ceiba 

Ciales 

Cidra 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Guanica 

Guayama 



EEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF HEALTH. 



173 



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14748—20 12 



174 



EEPOET OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 






I 
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\^\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ 




•ra9:iSifs ::::::::::::::: 
oT^^Bqdni^i JO sosBasTQ :::;::::::::::: 


;;•: •'^ ;:;::::: ; 


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oq!^ JO saseesip oiu«sao ;:::::;::: : 


; ; : ; : ;-^ ; : ;-^ : ; : : 


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•^ i ■ • • • i i i ; • • i : 


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CO ^ 


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oq^ JO sasBasip jaq:^o : : : : : : : :::::: 


:;;:: :^ ::::::: : 


•Bajoqo 


-':::;::;:::::!: 




•Asdaiida ^ \ \ \ '. '. •. '. ". '.'^ : : : : 


:::::;::::: :-^ : : 


•uoT:isa§noo i^jqajao ?;:;:;;: : : ; : : : : 




•s^nBju] JO suoTsinAuoo : '^ <^ ; ; ; "-^ "^ ; ; ; : ; ; ; 


: : :-^ : :-^ i-- : : : : : : 


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: : : : :^ : : \-^-^-^ : : : 


2 

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:^ : : :^ : : : : :^^ ; : 


.' J .' .* .' .' i .' .' .' .' .'(M .',-1 


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::::::: i-^ ::::: : 


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•«iuiauv 1 °° ; \'^ \<:r>^o ;'i-i J'*'-H ; ; : 


; ; ; ^ i ,-i ^ .' co • <n j .' .' j 


•sT|Tqd/LS :::::;::;; '."^ ;: : 




•s;a:iloiH 


coco j CCi-l CO r-H <N CO j<N(Na(CO(MC 


0<NTt<.-l \ jiCOi j icO(N05^.-t 


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jaq^o JO sTsoinojaqnx 1 ::::::::::::::: 




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•sisopojaqnx 


:^ ::::::••::;; :- 


^ : --^ : ; :-^ : : : : :-^ : 


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: : : : : :-^ : i-" : : : : : 


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; I<M i I IrH ! I ! 1 ! I I ! 


:: :^ :::::::::: : 


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•BTJBIBK 


rHC0»O j ! t-- -.*< (N Tfi fH I 't^(N • 


I^ ;_ !lOCSJ^T-H IcSJlO^rH I 






Adjuntas 

Aguada 

Aguadilla 

AguasBuenas 

Aibonito 

Anasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta 

Barranquitas 

Bayamon 

CaboRojo 

Caguas 

Camuy 


^tC;:;;::;:;::;:;::::;::;:;:;::;:;;::: 

Ciales 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Guaynabo 

Guanica 

Guayama 

Gurabo 



KEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF HEALTH. 



175 































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»-i<N(N'!*<COi-iiOCO • 


i 


Hatillo 

Hormigueros 

Humacao 

Jayuya 

Juana Diaz 

Juncos 

Lajas 


Loiza 

Luquillo 

Las Piedras 

Manati 

Maricao 

Maunabo 

Mayaguez 

Moca 

Morovis 




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176 



BEPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOE OF POBTO EIOO. 





•Ib:^o; puBJO 


§SSi2SSg2P;;^^i5^^^ 


^2§?^^^a^??2?5S2j^2 


11 


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1 N r-l • • '00 -CO • • f-H (N CO • 


;<M ; ;C^^ ; ; • (N r-i | |t-4 


*ses«a 
-srp otubSjo penyop-ni 


; :^ : : :^ :^ : : : : : : 


:::::::::::::: 


08 
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•9on9|OTA iBna9:^xo j9q^o 


: : : : : i^ : i : : : i : : 


:::::::: :'-^ ::: : 


•SUTOMOJP lB^U9p]00V 


'^ ::: i*^ :::::::: : 




•STuna 


-^ ::::::::: : i-^^ : 


: : [^-^^ :::::::: 


•Suniosiod poo J 




:::::::: :^ : :^ : 


•(eueaSireo) ^^s 9\i% jo es^esiQ 


::::'-:::::::::: 




Diseases of 
the genito- 
urinary 
organs. 


•Si£9Trp]3l 9q:) JO S9S«9STa 




: : :^ : : :-^ : : : : : : 


•ST!jijqd9n 9:^no V 


NC<»CO i^DTttrHi-ltO -oieocoooco 


»r5<N(N-* ji-H Ieci-<c<i '• • jeo 


43 

1 

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•xTi.OBqd 9q:^ jo s9st39STa 






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::;: i :::::: ;-^ : 


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^-^ ::::::::: i-^ : 


•uoponj:jsqo iBm:^s9^ni 


; i^ ::::::::::: : 




•ST-^ioTpuoddv 




:::: :^ ::::::: : 


•si^rao:^ij9j 


:: i ::•••• '^ : i^ : 




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C10S • ; ; ; •'-•eo ;;;;;; 


r-i ' !t-(N .'coin ;»-h J '• 1 1 


•BUBUTOUfl 


«N • 'n -CvI • • |.-tCi| J -tH 


••••'* jt^ •• jr-t 1 < • 


SI[TJ];U9 pu« B9qjJBTa 


ecoogeocfl'^coootO''** jooeot^io 


CO o csi oo cs c6 •'^ 0^ c^ oi !csieoo 


•Bxoune pu« 
mnoin oq:^ jo sesBasia 




:::::::::::::: 


t 

1 
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::::::::::: •'-^ : 


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-■:::: i-- i ::::: : 


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:::::::::: i :•'- i 




•iisijn9ia; 


:::: i : i-^ :::::: : 




•Braoumou^i 


C^ J»H I |rHTt< •C^eO'»*<CClrHeO 


i-ieo • • '-^ -c^ • 'Cfl • '"^ 


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EEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH. 



177 






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178 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH, 



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180 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



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BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF HEALTH. 



181 



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Appendix IV. 

REPORT OF THE AUDITOR, AND CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL 

EXHIBITS. 

San Juan, P. R., August 1, 1920. 
Sir: In accordance with the provisions of the law, I have the honor to render the 
following report comprising the financial operations carried on by the insular govern- 
ment and by the municipalities and school boards of Porto Rico during the fiscal 
year 1919-20. 

SYSTEM OP AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING. 

The system of auditing and accounting installed on July 1, 1911, is still in force 
with a few changes of minor importance introduced during the year, which were 
necessary to simplify same. 

MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING. 

In pursuance of the provisions of section 20 of the organic act and section 52 of the 
municipal law, new rules and regulations governing municipal accounting (including 
property accounting) were devised by this office and duly approved by the Governor 
of Porto Rico on May 26, 1920, to take effect on July 1, 1920. 

These rules and regulations involve a reorganization of the accounting system and 
procedure with very material changes from the system used to date, in step with the 
progress which of late years has been felt in accountancy. 

The system formerly vsed required all entries to be 'made through the journal and 
posted singly, whereas now registers of receipts and disbi rsements are kept and post- 
ings are made monthly in totals. An improAement, the need of which has always 
been very strongly felt, is a record or register of the requisitions and contracts, in order 
to be able at any time to ascertain the ortstanding indebtedness of the municipality 
and to prevent overdrawing the appropriations, and this is provided for in the new 
system. The rules and regulations include a set of the financial forms and reports to 
be used in connection therewith. Control accounts for the more important sources 
of revenue are also prescribed. Counterfoil receipt books are provided for use by the 
treasurers and deputy treasurers, in order to insure internal check on the collection 
of the municipal income. 

The system just outlined was, by direction of the auditor, prepared and compjlled 
in this office by the cooperative work of the chiefs of the two divisions of examinations 
and audits. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

The total amount of null and void appropriations as of June 30, 1920, as stated in 
previous report, is as follows: 

Appropriations not set up on the books of the auditor as of June 30, 191S $930, 149. 18 

Additional appropriations authorized by laws and resolutions of the first session of the ninth 
le^slature, promulgated and published in virtue of a decision of the Supreme Court ol Porto 

Rico, dated March 11, 1919 13, S03. 1 G 

Appropriations approved at the second ordinary session of the ninth legislature, for fiscal 
year 1919-20 495 , 509. 1 S 

' Total 1,439,461.52 

As has been stated in my previors reports, such appropriations are in excess of the 
total income for the corresponding fiscal years, and therefore the treasurer and the 
auditor can not set them up on their books, they being in violation of the existing 
organic law. 

In regard to the appropriations standing on the books of this office on July 1, 1920, 
as shown in Exhibit No. 32 of this report, the total estimated expenditrres for next 
fiscal year will be $9,810,083.45. The estimated income and appropriation assets for 

182 



KEPORT OF THE AUDITOR. ' 183 

the fiscal year 1920-21, as also shown in Exhibit No. 32, amount to $10,216,169.78, 
eaving an estimated surplus of $406,086.33. This surplus is explained as follows: 

Estimated income for fiscal year 1920- 21 $9, 015, 000. 00 

Appropriations lor same fiscal year, including $30,000 as estimated indefinite m 

appropriations T : 8, 109,253. 15 

Surplus for year 1920-21 1905,747.85 

Cash balance as of .lune 30, 1920 1, 057, 414. 15 

Plus excess of securities hypothecated 6, 500. 00 

Total 1,063,914.15 

Previous year appropriations still pending, June 30, 1920 792, 189. 11 

Surplus for previous years 271 , 725. 04 

Loans '. 125,491.41 

Gross surplus to be applied to no fiscal vear appropriations 1, 30!i, 964. 30 

Balance of no fiscal year appropriations as of June 30, 1920 896, 877. 97 

Surplus on June 30, 1920, and estimated surplus for 1 920-21, as of June 30, 1920 406, 086. 33 

FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 

The exhibits appearing in this report were prepared by the following departments: 

Auditor of Porto Rico: From No. 1 to No. 5, inclusive; Nos. 11, 12, and 13; No. 25 
(disbursements) ; and No. 32. 

Department of finance: Nos. 6 to 9, inclusive; Nos. 14, 19, and 20 to 24, inclusive; 
No. 25 (receipts), 26, 30 (receipts), and No. 31 (receipts). 

University of Porto Rico: Nos. 15 to 18, inclusive. 

Department of the interior: No. 10 and Nos. 33 to 37, inclusive. 

Porto Rico irrigation service: Nos. 38, 39, and 40. 

Comparative Statement of Accrued: Expenses Payable from Insular Reve 
NUES Appropriations for the Years Ended June 30, 1919, and June 30, 1920 
(Exhibit No. 5). 

The government expenses for fiscal year 1919-20 show a net increase of |916, 094.02 
for salaries and $81,606.51 for other miscellaneous expenses, totaling $997,706.53. 
The increase in the first item was brought about by the raise of salaries of all govern- 
ment employees approved by the legislature in the budget for the year under review. 
A considerable portion of the increase in the second item can be attributed to the 
constant increase in prices that all commodities have obtained for the last five years. 

legislative department. 

The usual appropriation for an ordinary session of the legislature was set up in the 
budget for fiscal year 1919-20 whereas only a special session lasting 11 days took place, 
and this resulted in a decrease of the expenses of this department of $37,789.68, as 
compared with the previous year. 

executive department. 

Governor: The office of the governor expended $4,820.14 more than previous year; 
$2,487.50 of this amount represents increase in salaries, the rest of it consists of $1,191.39 
in expenses, executive mansion; $1,293.06 in stationery and printing; $126.45 in 
postage and freight; $108.52 in incidentals, and a decrease of $386.78 in telegraph and 
telephone. 

Executive secretary: Increases qf $900.88 in salaries, oflice of the executive secre- 
tary; $4,297.43 in salaries, bureau of weights and measures; and $8,824.50, bureau of 
supplies, printing, and transportation, are the most important items of this office. 
Other increases are — $232.16 in stationery and printing, $526.25 in traveling expenses, 
$632.86 in contingent expenses, bureau of supplies, printing, and transportation, and 
$17.87 in telegraph and telephone; decreases of $667.09 in furniture and equipment, 
$258.84 in postage and freight, $113.09 in incidentals, and $88.76 in printing and pub- 
lication of laws offset the above increases. 

Historical Archives of Porto Rico: This is a new office created by act No. 64, 
approved June 20, 1919. 

Public service commission: Increases of $2,246.49 in salaries and $339.59 in inci- 
dentals are reduced by a saving of $1,160.95 in miscellaneous expenses, leaving a net 
increase of $1,425.13. 



184 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Justice: This year a net saving of $16,959.86 has been obtained. With the exception 
of the increases in salaries, all the expenses are greatly reduced, specially ''food for 
prisoners" in the amount of $21,671.07, and "incidentals," $18,809.65, due to the fact 
that no emerg^cy expenditures occurred during this year. 

Finance: There is a net increase of $27,838.34 m expenses of this department. The 
increase of $34,771.93 in salaries is offset by savings of $22,187.03, "reimbursement to 
municipalities for influenza expenditures," and $4,833.41 in "incidentals." Other 
increases of $13,893.74 in "preparation of property tax receipts," and $2,900.15 in 
"traveling expenses" are due to activities of the office for the purpose of increasing 
Government revenues, some other increases of minor importance offset ones to the 
others. 

Auditor: Expenses of this office have been $5,563.91 more than last year's. Out of 
that amount, $5,371.12 is the increase in salaries already explained; the remaining 
small increases and decreases leave a net increase of $192.79. 

Interior: With the exception of $38,283.53 increase in salaries, all the increases in 
expenses of this department, are extraordinary expenditures for the repair and recon- 
struction of public buildings, roads and bridges damaged bv earthquakes, amounting 
to $120,212.30 for roads and bridges, and $240,469.17 for buildings. 

Insular tel^aph: Practically there is no change in the operation expenses for tele- 
graph and telephone service. The only item of increase is $27,919.92 in salaries; 
expenses appearing under "incidentals" in last year's report have been distributed 
in several other items in accordance with the nature of the expenditures. 

Education: Increases in salaries for educational purposes amount to $634,001.74, 
increase of $8,708.18 "aiding school boards in the maintenance of school lunch rooms," 
and $6,111.98 "purchase and maintenance of supplies in the laboratories. College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Mayaguez," are new appropriations. 

Carnegie Librarv: The expenses of this office have been increased in the amounts 
of $1,470.50 in salaries and $1,404.10 in incidentals. 

Government of the Island of Culebra: Increase in the expenses of the government 
of the Island of Culebra, in addition to $791 .17 for salaries, are new expenses authorized 
by law and provided for in the budget of 1919-20. 

Agriculture and labor: Besides the increase of $41,934.22, there are increases of 
$13,038.03, expenses of a new division of forestry, and $11,238.72 for the extension of 
the experimental station and field force. 

Insular police: The increase in salaries of the insular police is $107,406.34, plus 
$4,523.50 in pay for reenlistments, the next increase to be taken in consideration is 
$14,012.24 in transportation, due to transfer of guardmen fb districts invaded by 
laborer's strikes. 

Health: Notwithstanding the increases of $29,929.49 in salaries and $50,222.53 in 
subsistence for asylums and hospitals, there is a great saving of $266,550.13, due to the 
reduction of emergency expenditures, which have been $25,097.96 less in emergency 
fund for control and suppression of epidemics, $10,735.48 in care of tuberculosis 
patients, and $246,203.09 m suppression of influenza. 

Civil service commission: The only important increase of this office is $1,064.79. 

General miscellaneous: A net saving of $35,683.23 is shown here, which is due to 
extraordinary expenses, such as "entertainment fund for members of Congress of the 
United States," amounting to $24,747.20, and "repayments of loans made to 
the insular government during emergency due to earthquake of October, 1918," 
amounting to $45,122.77, which were incurred di ring the previous fiscal year, there 
are also savings of $3,065.53 in the expenditures subject to the approval of the gov- 
ernor, $3,051.08 in National Guard of Porto Rico, and $2,038.10 in temporary employees 
translation bureau. Provisions have been made for election expenses, $29,746.41, 
and $3,800 relief of victims, Yagiiez Theater fire, in Mayahuez. 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 

There is a saving of $7,604.76 in publication of the decisions of the supreme court, 
which offset in part the increase of $7,875.87 in salaries; district and municipal courts 
show increases of $11,142.85 in salaries and $18,154.47 in fees of jurors and witnesses. 
Increase of $6,039.40 is the only important item in the expenses of the registrars of 
property. 

DIVISION OF GENERAL ACCOUNTS. 

This division has been always in charge of compiling the necessary information 
to set up the appropriations authorized by the legislature providing for the ordinary 
government expenditures. This year said work was rapid and efficiently done, in 
order to have the digest of appropriations for next fiscal year on time to permit opening 



BEPOBT OF THE AUDITOB. 



185 



the necessary accounts for said fiscal year. Copies of this digest have been furnished 
to each department of the insular government for the same purpose. 

In regard to the head, no fiscal year appropriations; the campaign initiated in 1917- 
18 has been continued this year, reducing the balance of $1,906,739.59, shown in last 
year's report, to $895,877.97, actual balance. 

During the present year many changes occurred in the personnel of this division, 
but its efficiency was not impaired. 

DIVISION OP DISBURSEMENTS AND CLAIMS. 

The division audited and prepared checks to the number of 114,474, covering dis- 
bursements in amount, as shown in Exhibit No. 28 of the annual report. 

There has been an increase in the number of vouchers as compared with previous 
fiscal year. In the fiscal year 1918-19 the number of vouchers was 109,706, while 
during this fiscal year the number of vouchers was 114,474. 

Every effort has been made to leave no vouchers pending. Any delay in the set- 
tlement of claims is usually due to discrepancies, either in the form in which the 
vouchers are presented or in the charging of a proposed expenditure against the wrong 
appropriation. 

DIVISION OP AUDITS. 

The approval of the new municipal law which took effect on October 29, 1919, 
marks a new epoch in the history of the municipalities of Porto Rico. The municipal 
administration is now divided into five departments with a commissioner as the head 
of each, and the school boards, which formerly functioned as separate bodies, are 
now merged with the municipalities as a municipal department of education. 

As stated in one of the preceding paragraphs of this report, the Code of Accounting 
Rules and Regulations was promulgated on May 26, 1920, to take effect on July 1, 
1920, which was prepared by this division in cooperation with the division of examina- 
tions. These regulations provide a new system of accounting and properly classified 
financial reports to be furnished monthly to this office, which will permit of the prep- 
aration by this division of an annual rei)ort on the municipalities of Porto Rico by 
''functions,'* showing the different municipal activities and the attention given to 
each. 

The changes above mentioned resulted in a number of inquiries from municipal 
officials, involving questions of law and regulations, and the necessary information 
was furnished to the municipal officials for their proper guidance. 

Table No. 1. — Statement of receipts of the various municipalities of Porto Rico for tfte 
fiscal year ending June SO, 1920. 



Municipalities. 



Balance 

July 1, 

1919. 



Cash bond 
deposits. 



Proceeds 
from 
loans. 



Other 
trust 
funds. 



Property tax. 



Education 
fund. 



General 
fund. 



Adjuntas 

Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Aguas Buenas. 

Aibonito 

Anasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta... 
Barranquitas. 

Barros 

Bayamon 

Cabo Rojo . . . . 

Casxias 

Carauy 

Carolina 

Cayey 

Ceiba 

Ciales 

Cidra 

Coamo 

Comerio 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Fajardo 



1106.25 
1,092.65 
3,039.80 
1,621.62 
1,790.48 

820.16 
13,642.80 
6,934.85 
3,406.83 
1,311.8,5 

697.38 
6,359.56 
5,774.53 
2,550.92 

361 .74 
6,347.59 
6,619.51 

959.60 
1,864.28 

161.63 

970.21 

4,730.86 

1,989.94 

2,093.67 

21,640.59 



$46.25 



534.83 
2,305.00 



2,428.67 
143.00 
515.00 
33.00 



391.00 



70.00 

120.00 

2,997.84 

2,275.75 

140.00 

195.51 



210.00 

2,012.00 

285.78 

60.00 

942.40 



13,000.00 



5,500.00 
43,067.65 



24,000.00 



8,500.00 

"d','m.bo 



$75.00 
200.00 
490.55 



145.00 
100.00 
325.00 
8.02 
300.00 
150.00 



1,088.72 
""i76'.i6 



4,464.34 
238. « 



191 .75 
1,721.65 



61 .38 
776.00 



$9,056.81 
8,750.61 
6,989.09 
2,247.69 
4,866.13 
6,107.35 

29,984.08 
6,463.76 

11,491.27 
2,533.13 
2,643.48 

15,447.56 
8,155.87 

16,410.60 
4,516.76 
9,962.69 
9,214.89 
3,852.99 
5,857.67 
3,812.60 
5,245.71 
6,344.30 
2,136.56 

10,478.77 

14,477.36 



$14,672.23 
16,315.46 
16,647.98 

5,691.82 
10,191.79 
14,967.71 
65,146.65 
13,854.64 
20,728.36 

4,780.42 

7,555.52 
38,430.08 
19,319.29 
42,789.66 
13,973.78 
23,452.28 
23,865.90 

6,886.75 
14,956.41 

7,685.78 
13,483.77 
15,232.91 

5,718.65 
11,949.97 
32,194.59 



186 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 1. — Statement of receipts of the various municipahties of Porto Rico for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Municipalities, 



Balance 

.lulv 1, 

1919. 



Cash bond 
deposits. 



Proceeds 
from 
loans. 



Other 
trust 
funds. 



Property tax. 



Education 
fund. 



r.eneral 
fund. 



Guanica 

Guayama 

Guayanilla 

Guaynabo 

Gurabo 

Hatillo 

Hormifi'ueros 

Humacao 

Isabela 

Jayuya 

Juana Diaz 

Juncos 

Lajas 

Lares 

Las Marias 

Las Piedras 

Loiza 

Luquillo 

Manati 

Maricao 

Maunabo 

Maya^iez 

Moca 

Morovis 

Nasfuabo 

Naranjito 

Patillas 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas 

Rincon 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

Sabana Grande. 

Salinas 

San German 

San Juan 

San Lorenzo 

San Sebastian... 

Santa Isabel 

ToaAlta 

ToaBaja 

Trujillo Alto.... 

Utuado 

Vega Alta 

Ve.j?a Baja 

Vieques 

Villalba 

Yabucca 

Yauco 



$16,835.50 
11,322.96 
7,054.82 
1,782.85 
1,776.47 
3,928.45 
1,844.05 
6,991.87 

420.29 
2,947.29 
2,737.95 
3,979.16 
1,512.51 
3,642.87 
1,059.88 
5,135.26 
6,584.08 
3,661.78 
2,377.45 
2,318.33 
4,633.71 
9,214.61 

958.94 

151 .29 
3,052.81 

925.58 
1,819.84 

429.88 
13,342.18 

326.39 

1,741.26 

1,783.09 

86,907.43 

2,135.11 

12,263.81 

1,638.68 

72.919.11 

840. 02 
2,604.15 
6,907.83 
1,231 .06 
1,5.30.13 
6,824.07 
3,798.05 
1,687.78 
3,145.63 
21,449.26 
3,032.03 
6,062.32 
14,366.74 



$713 .00 
57.75 



$23,374.26 



$126.04 
2,813.67 



226.00 



4,270.00 



155.00 



3,611.50 
75.00 



1,502.00 



238.00 
90.00 



912.25 
2,554.00 
1,035.00 
1,060.00 



9,842.52 



300.00 



406.61 
212.92 



3,151.00 

80.00 

8,060.70 



984.90 
7, 880 .00 



10,000.00 



975.00 



1, 481 .50 

200.00 

1, 162 .00 



1,507.64 



6,510.19 
50.00 



25.00 



378,106.80 
1,203.38 



4,044.64 
36, 133 .87 



1,227.-56 

264.28 

38,523.49 

179.50 

103.63 



12.00 
4,680.00 

27,856.75 

1,318.00 

472 .06 



2,822.13 

'"'eog'.is' 



9,000.00 I 
233,825.06 j 278.; 



2,755.00 
195.00 



59.00 
1,081.00 
1,426.00 



90.96 



12,000.00 



80.00 



51.96 



Total I 472,520.81 



129,850.93 



771,842.23 



40.00 
500.00 
500.00 
231 .57 

75.00 
471 .06 



2,012.45 



301 .00 
350.00 



$21,a32.31 

17,152.90 

11,572.20 

3,361.91 

4,401.82 

7,310.97 

7,155.66 

14,226.28 

4,151.60 

4,613.40 

21,588.61 

7,187.41 

7,755.37 

7,933.46 i 

4.227.25 ; 
3,891.37 I 

10,082.69 I 
3,932.53 I 

11,078.51 I 
4,471.95 , 

3.187.65 ''■ 
16,666.77 ' 

3,707.40 I 
2,386.76 \ 

7.635.66 I 

2.004.26 I 
5,735.00 
4,563.82 ! 

50,135.01 
1,591.37 j 
3,554.88 
8,850.78 

29,109.94 
3,035.26 i 

18,249.51 ; 

8.901.45 ; 
99,279.08 i 

3,443.59 
9,434.37 ' 
11,206.13 

3.399.39 1 

6.790.40 I 
3,795.36 I 

10,198.57 

7.911.46 : 
10,095.58 
12,105.06 i 

4,430.36 ! 
10,374.72 I 

7.162.67 I 



$46,840.24 
36, 697 .02 
11,316.47 

7.966.96 
li; 198.13 
12,537.44 

7,981.92 
34,234.82 
10,199.49 

9,744.48 
27,706.14 
16,058.02 
15,016.78 
18,931.77 
10,878.10 

9,827.19 
25,083.29 

8,826.89 
26,652.38 
10,912.20 

7,460.47 
53,000.04 

7,099.18 

6,806.05 
18,618.15 

3,7«>0.82 
11,260.59 

9,907.27 
122,075.35 

6.060.38 

8,448.22 
16,273.83 
39,441.41 

6,533.88 

31,030.51 

21,. 557. 34 

272,730.91 

9, 104 .84 
14,556.55 
17,093.38 

7.148.89 
17,754.07 

8,406.27 
22,233.97 
14,969.52 
19,253.45 
27,242.77 

5,984.27 
28,024.51 
22,1.51.34 



70,371.74 753,421.09 



1,075,110.36 



Municipalities. 



Operation 
of public 



Industrial 
and com- 
mercial 
licenses. 



Repay- 
ments. 



Use of 
municipal 
property. 



Miscel- 
laneous. 



Total. 



Adjuntas 

Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Aguas Buenas.. 
Aibonito....'... 

Anasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta 

Barranquitas... 

Barros 

Bayamon 

Cabo Rojo 

Caguas 

Camuy 

Carolina 



$4,027.27 



2, 514. 25 

1, 663. 00 

• 23,574.14 

4, 703. 12 



947.00 



10.32 



$1, 804. 82 
872. 34 
7, 268. 54 
1, 753. 50 
2,225.22 
2,054.75 

14, 852. 59 
2, 255. 83 
1, 693. 71 
1,436.11 
1,111.74 

14,087.12 
2, 820. 27 

22, 214. 34 
1,25L45 
3,360. 16 



$136. 35 

83.30 

30.60 

41.28 

74.04 

73.14 

902.07 

58.12 

278. 63 

102. 05 

191. 64 

1, 516. 28 

101. 89 

280.77 

37.93 

86.94 



$353. 40 
113. 75 

1. 215. 05 
272. 60 
228. 25 
186. 50 

7. 719. 06 
1, 558. 09 

152. 00 

290.60 

138. 75 

1, 841. 35 

1,473.25 

12, 188. 43 

25.44 

563.00 



$120. 01 
100.32 

1, 206. 12 

114,56 

233. 36 

89.01 

2, 160. 02 
358.06 
674. 96 
523, 91 
195. 76 

3,327,30 
570. 66 

1,024,45 
148. 83 
678. 75 



$26,371.12 
27, 528, 43 
44,449.83 
14,047.97 
22, 268. 52 
31,561,62 

203, 802, 63 
36,337.49 
39, 240. 76 
12, 107. 97 
12, 534, 27 

106,488.97 
38,215.76 
97, 705. 33 
20,446.25 
51,913.49 



EEPOET OF THE AUDITOR. 



187 



Table No. 1. — Statement of receipts of the various municipalities of Porto Rico for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Municipalities. 



Operation 
oi" public 



Industrial 
and com- 
mercial 
licenses. 



Repay- 
ments. 



Use of 
municipal 
property. 



Miscel- 
laneous. 



Total. 



Cayey 

Ceiba 

Ciales 

Cidra 

Coamo 

Comerio 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Fajardo 

Guanica 

Guayama 

Guayanilla 

Guaynabo 

Gurabo 

Hatillo 

Hormigueros 

Humacao 

Isabela 

Jayuya 

Juana Diaz 

Juncos 

Lajas 

Lares 

Las Marias 

Las Piedras 

Loiza 

Luquillo 

Manati 

Maricao 

Maunabo 

Mayaguez 

Moca 

Morovis 

Naguabo 

Naranjito 

Patillas 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas 

Rincon 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

Sabana Grande . 

Salinas 

San German 

San Juan 

San Lorenzo 

San Sebastian... 

Santa Isabel 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

TrujilloAlto.... 

Utuado 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

Vieques 

Villalba 

Yabucca 

Yauco 



$7,412.1 



1,291.90 



3, 591. 50 

1,355.14 

855. 96 



10, 463. 04 
* 17 '620.' 93 



2, 222. 78 



5, 404. 71 



422. 43 

209. 50 

3,299.17 



439. 86 

539. 75 

7, 890. 00 



9.50 

457.83 

523. 00 

63, 802. 12 



3,474.80 



126,910.10 



Total. 



1, 896. 39 
14.19 



2,036.90 
3, 150. 16 



2, 588. 99 



306, 524. 67 



$7, 455. 95 

695. 32 

2, 906. 94 

1, 632. 56 

2, 554. 73 

2, 845. 06 

2,219.23 

750. 19 

5, 991. 43 

2, 105. 87 

7, 535. 20 

1, 148. 83 

858. 55 

1,484.91 

1. 135. 16 
613. 55 

12,320.45 
2, 388. 67 
1,337.27 
2; 784. 28 
4,369.42 
1,381.17 
3,43L75 
543. 94 

1. 234. 17 
2, 491. 66 

647. 65 
7,320.70 
1,146.41 
2,027.15 

28,221.81 
396. 44 
1, 049. 69 
4, 143. 49 
1,04L00 
1,374.59 
1, 077. 82 

35,493.93 
1,214.22 
1, 020. 57 
2,377.52 
8,547.11 
3,024.11 
3, 053. 63 
5, 973. 02 

98,295.63 
2, 519. 02 
2,680.42 
1,360.51 
2,004.28 
1, 132. 38 
799. 79 
4, 283. 26 
1, 908. 79 
5, 185. 83 
3,409.04 
890. 86 
4,033.05 
5,942.51 



$233. 80 

34.00 

46.68 

61.92 

111.88 

46.70 

54.96 

27.20 

687. 00 

34.56 

325. 35 

1L28 

31.16 

73.70 

47.40 

70.30 

152. 47 

58.10 

67. 56 

161. 66 

89.64 

44.40 

200. 76 

60.28 

8.75 

147. 49 

56.80 

218. 12 

90.12 

300.17 

190.16 

176. 16 

32.93 

95.42 

55.68 

164.27 

99.24 

26, 894. 89 

73.58 

29.26 

155. 12 

136. 95 

102. 96 

112. 92 

161.01 

7,253.17 

100.99 

159. 29 

34.80 

39.23 

59.01 

27.51 

135,36 

797. 49 

201. 73 

466. 89 

40.78 

230. 04 

297. 27 



$2,205.20 

201. 90 

541. 25 

529. 95 

1,048.68 

1, 203. 39 

377. 30 

124. 40 

2, 030. 00 

514. 75 

2, 164. 38 

344. 52 

56.00 

410.32 

82.35 

129. 75 

4,820.08 

36. 00 

60.00 

795. 35 

1,135.05 

258. 29 

2, 887. 26 

120. 50 

330. 17 

804. 27 

279. 50 

1,681.41 

85.98 

522. 75 

15, 943. 55 

167. 25 

635. 75 

1,266.68 

148. 52 

580.50 

228. 09 

20,845.50 

38.94 

22.25 

1, 151. 80 

5,614.30 

130. 90 

720. 40 

2, 199. 35 

31,979.02 

479. 35 

1, 542. 42 

399. 25 

555. 45 

123. 75 

66.75 

1,020.10 

882. 55 

288. 80 

325.50 

165.50 

1,817.44 

6,206.58 



$1,052.86 
287. 80 

521. 34 
184.84 
467. 66 
364. 09 
178.00 
380. 52 

1, 719. 54 
948. 67 
759. 89 
399. 93 
149. 04 
683.48 
335. 91 

2, 554. 71 

1, 156. 28 
174. 86 
200. 56 
494. 43 

1, 190. 58 
311. 60 
487. 42 
9L56 
444. 33 
472. 74 
293. 50 

1,074.93 
105. 11 
155. 06 

3,4.30.08 
125.11 
92.35 
566.23 
117. 16 
227. 40 
300. 30 

5, 737. 58 

58. 4S 

91.09 

230. 51 

5, 666. 39 
238. 07 
460.48 

1, 848. 32 
84,62L31 
240. 92 
210. 93 
398. 86 
170. 73 
324. 73 
311.48 
471.83 
315. 80 
762. 71 
757. 65 

219. 35 
1, 505. 89 
2,947.51 



$69,075.20 
13,058.36 

31. 181. 98 
14,261.03 
29, 405. 79 

34. 134. 45 
13,913.27 
25,926.10 
90,92L95 

112,112.20 
97, 105. 30 
32, 794. 60 
14,435.47 
22,25L61 

• 29, 840. 76 
20, 349. 94 

83. 156. 46 
19,096.01 

19. 392. 99 
57, 690. 17 
49,704.97 
27, 315. 12 
41, 570. 89 

17. 194. 43 
20,87L24 
48, 817. 22 
17, 781. 65 
58, 584. 20 
19, 569. 96 
19,811.61 

158,947.21 
12, 680. 48 

11. 154. 82 

36. 378. 44 
8, 082. 52 

25,836.72 
17, 593. 70 

756,118.85 
10, 746. 24 
15,011.16 
34, 867. 29 

214,379.63 
15,200.29 
69,987.24 
55,959.17 
1,055,948.66 
18,047.63 
31,700.19 
37,900.76 

17. 804. 03 

28. 141. 04 
20,306.23 
44, 658. 55 
29, 568. 58 
54,372.18 
66,069.43 
14,763.15 

54. 517. 83 
62, 574. 78 



398,874.98 



45,873.35 



149, 646. 31 



141,616.57 



4,915,662.04 



188 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 2. — Statement of disbursements of the various miinidpalities of Porto Rico 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920. 





Cash bond 
deposits. 


Education 
fund. 


Other trust 
funds. 


Repayment of loans. 


Salaries. 


Municipalities. 


Principal 


Interest. 




$105. 25 
2,931.03 

15.00 
2,345.00 

25.00 

53.00 
1,707.73 

44.00 
515.00 

33.00 


$4,267.02 








$9,737.83 


Aguada 






$2.48 

4, 533. 04 

75. 52 

390. 68 

304.79 

3,347.50 

350.00 

90.00 

146.92 


9,303.81 


Aguadilla 


5,551.06 

1,392.35 

2,621.33 

3, 671. .54 

18,312.08 

3,967.80 

3,688.38 

1,460.02 

2,097.18 

11,289.42 

4,762.35 

11,654.82 

2,615.96 

7, 144. 81 

5,125.97 

999.97 

3,949.19 

2,138.86 

3,657.56 

4,234.09 

1,418.16 

2,558.99 

7, 882. 02 

12,254.12 

8,484.82 

3,454.24 

3,008.38 

1,960.42 

1,858.06 

6, 080. 30 

7,087.68 

2,5.^)5.22 

2,965.14 

10,532.51 

3,668.32 

2,779.71 

5,188.87 

2,632.36 

1,930.30 

3,980.31 

1,108.32 

5,838.96 

3,617.03 

2,15L50 

9,553.39 

2,774.95 

1,430.75 

2,580.66 

826. 61 

5,040.98 

4,020.27 

31,691.50 

2,165.12 

2, 136. 83 

3,057.77 

10,257.23 

1, 800. 52 

7,969.17 

6, 702. 49 

44,691.86 

1,987.35 

4, 136. 35 

8,273.05 

1,421.59 

6, 070. 47 

1,255.95 

7,527.87 

4, 137. 22 

0,530.28 

7,329.72 

959. 24 

5,503.51 

6,733.22 


$1,567.45 


$7,950.00 

300.00 

2,047.50 

500.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 


12,452.28 


AE;uas Buenas 


3, 720. 55 


Aibonito 




7,608.56 


Anasco 




10, 132. 89 


Arecibo 


25.86 

8.02 

214. 87 


56, 779. 39 


Arroyo 


10,244.18 


Barceloneta 


10, 106. 80 


Barranquitas 


4,114.11 


Barros . 






5, 106. 94 


Bayamon 


898.00 


519. 52 


9,851.09 


180.00 


24,111.21 


Cabo Rojo 


11,207.78 


Ca^as. . . : V. 


118.16 
110.00 
2, 818. 00 
2, 115. 75 
150.00 
188.00 


47.48 


5,000.00 
500.00 


3, 150. 00 
180.00 


29,038.87 


Camuv 


8,156.96 


Carolina 




11,615.26 


Cayey 


216.91 


3,952.28 


2,274.32 


16,336.03 


Ceiba . 


4,998.43 


dales 


117*58' 

1,075.86 


2,475.00 


1,041.53 


8,029.89 


Cidra.. 


5,908.34 


Coamo 


210.00 

1,984.00 

321.61 


2,500.00 

1,250.00 

500.00 

500.00 

750. 00 

4,355.22 

2,000.00 

1,837.50 


225.00 
484.97 
169. 39 
202.50 
140.00 
1,695.34 
180.00 
360.00 


10,319.21 


Comerio 


11,212.79 


Corozal 




4,. 503. 35 


Dorado 




4,976.86 


Fajardo 


863.15 


6,924.47 


20,545.04 


Guanica 


13,135.00 


Guayama 


191.00 
57.75 


946.63 


27,625.21 


Guayamilla 


7,681.48 


Guaynabo . . 


138.81 


4, 818. 55 


Gurabo .'.'.'. 


82.00 
25.00 


2,460.45 


730.72 
93.00 


8,070.92 


Hatillo 




6, 806. 09 


Hormigueros.. . 






4,486.15 


Humacao 


3,661.50 
85.00 




5, 500. 00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

2, 500. 00 


2,809.13 

174. 80 

67.50 

245.00 

1,759.58 


28,819.96 


Tsabela 


30.00 


6,000.16 


Jayuya 


6, 093. 66 


Juana Diaz 


912. 25 
2,488.00 
1,053.00 
1, 139. 80 

100.63 




15,161.97 


Juncos 


562. 20 


11,518.66 


Laias 


8,664.18 


Lares 


79.95 
42.37 


1,000.00 


232. 17 


•10,734.84 


Las Marias 


6,116.40 


Las Piedras 






5, 171. 82 


Loiza 


3,172.00 

80.00 

8,341.70 








12,004.49 


Luquillo 




250.00 


43.16 


5,397.89 


Manati 




16, 191. 82 


Maricao 




1,000.00 


45.00 


5,415.28' 


Maunabo 


1,024.90 
8,294.00 




6,794.75 


Mayaguez 


816.04 


4, 533. 81 


1,122.93 


54,237.66 


Moca 


4,492.49 


Morovis 










4,269.86 


Naguabo . . 


1,055.00 




750.66 
266. 67 
500.00 
600.00 
50,500.00 
470.00 
254. 92 


270.00 

31.34 

147. 96 

506. 25 

20, 867. 33 

89.73 

26.61 


12, 189. 61 


Naranjito 




2, 873. 76 


Pati;as 


1,551.50 
9.00 
63.00 


682. 7i 

244.36 

66, 885. 08 

179. 50 


8, 117. 79 


Penuelas 


6, 137. 04 


Ponce 


124,596.07 


Quebradillas 


4,164.74 


Rincon 


132. 12 
4,020.50 
35,930.75 


4,301.65 


Rio Grandp 




8,255.65 


Rio Piedras 




7, 168. 12 


414. 25 


24,376.73 


Sabana Grande 




5,343.74 


Salinas.... 




49.81 


3,000.00 

1,000.00 

116,636.78 

763.25 

1,500.00 

i56.'66" 

1,000.00 
112.50 
2,750.00 
1,225.00 
3, 169. 86 
2, 500. 00 


877. 50 

423.50 

20,272.39 

60.08 

405.00 

47.* 26' 

315.00 
5.66 
942.84 
191.27 
389. 33 
1,677.50 


16,292.21 


San German . . 


4,700.00 

26,586.67 

1,363.00 

335.00 


13,192.27 


San Juan 


139. 26 


233,450.49 


San Lorenzo . . . . . . - 


4,970.36 


San Sebastian 




8,735.92 


Santa Isabel 


moo" 

80.06 


11,176.51 


Toa Aita 


2,980.00 

279.00 

10.00 

55.00 

981.00 

1,463.00 


5,102.33 


Toa Baja 


8,968.87 


Trulillo Alto 


5,213.40 


Utuado 


616.09 


16,029.77 


Veaa Alta 


7,319.26 


Vega Baja 


1,667.28 
9,621.39 


12,015.47 


Vieques 


12, 146. 13 


Villalbft 




3, 169. 08 




80.00 


281. 50 






17,378.15 




8,956.22 


4,332.50 


14,649.15 










Total 


129,853.75 


407,162.92 


94,281.06 


271,786.17 


79,150.27 


1,180,140.80 







BEFOBI OF THE AT7DIT0B. 



189 



Table No. 2. — Statement of disbursements of the various municipalities of Porto Rico 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Municipalities. 



Purchase 
of unex- 
pendable 
property. 



Purchase 
of supplies. 



Wages and 
per diems. 



Miscella- 
neous. 



Total. 



Adjuntas 

Aguada 

Aguadilla 

AguasBuenas. 

Aibonito 

Anasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta 

Barranquitas.. 

Barros 

Bavamon 

CaooRojo 

Caguas... 

Camuy 

Carolina 

Cayey 

Ceiba 

Ciales 

Cidra 

Coamo 

Comerio 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Fajardo , 

Guanica , 

Guayama , 

Guayanilla 

Guajmabo 

Gurabo 

Hatillo , 

Hormigueros . . . 

Humacao 

Isabela 

Jayuya 

JuanaDiaz 

Juncos 



Lares 

Las Marias 

Las Piedras 

Loiza 

Luquillo 

Manati 

Maricao 

Maunabo 

Mayaguez 

Moca 

Morovis 

Naguabo 

Naranjito 

Patillas 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas 

Rincon 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

Sabana Grande. 

Salinas 

San German.... 

San Juan 

San Lorenzo 

San Sebastian . . 

Santa Isabel 

ToaAlta 

ToaBaja 

TrujilloAlto.... 

Utuado 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

Vieques 

Villalba 

Yabucoa 

Yauco 



Total. 



14748—20- 



180.55 

90.75 

191.40 

48.00 

53.80 

5,531.26 

37,526.63 

725. 74 

452. 25 

194.34 

61.75 

17,721.89 

272. 69 

1,029.03 

81.62 

662.39 

2,654.82 

58.55 

1,65L25 

561.05 

165.50 

858.87 

139.06 

675.44 

5,405.74 

1,318.84 

2,823.39 

1,805.18 

650.45 

718. 55 

3,333.08 

39.05 

601.39 

1,048.47 

517. 86 

2,960.47 

12,502.21 

393. 01 

33.57 

10.50 

1,461.60 

463.36 

289. 95 

736. 93 

106.01 

226.50 

3,028.13 

91.49 

126. 62 

192. 18 

188.00 

1,363.47 

216.00 

23,922.70 

487. 12 

120.85 

602.86 

63,340.07 

18.70 

6,892.00 

5,364.64 

39,288.33 

601.36 

409.66 

1, 168. 44 

173.60 

1,086.76 

442.26 

723. 11 

2,774.48 

8, 118. 52 

6,304.60 

343.25 

990.80 

439. 67 



266,744.17 



$2,677.42 

2,660.17 

3,362.24 

931.39 

1,939.88 

2, 123. 02 

26,290.66 

9,770.38 

6,640.68 

1,612.06 

2,161.44 

14,060.82 

4,757.92 

20,280.69 

6,476.92 

2,792.82 

12,505.37 

1,230.54 

3,426.01 

664.19 

3,763.38 

6,324.89 

1,212.85 

1, 691. 84 

7,494.82 

15,837.68 

15,933.76 

6, 146. 16 

2,016.18 

2,002.90 

2,467.93 

1, 110. 84 

16, 116. 45 

1,290.19 

2,626.06 

8,040.23 

4,666.35 

3,456.96 

6,652.62 

2,621.69 

2, 172. 27 

3,633.37 

1,715.32 

6, 765. 60 

3,069.63 

2,655.07 

42,694.12 

1, 995. 23 

2,626.21 

2,494.31 

697. 92 

4,618.44 

1,407.41 

138,290.37 

1,543.38 

3,263.05 

5,901.23 

11,256.15 

2,467.50 

9,811.33 

8,883.49 

219, 116. 44 

926.68 

3,610.42 

6,358.76 

1,739.43 

3,376.10 

1,654.82 

5,814.11 

3,280.32 

6,602.22 

7,093.52 

626. 67 

10,416.88 



769,686.80 



$2, 147. 82 
2,486.21 
2,702.82 
1,067.67 
1,'413. 99 
3, 112. 90 

14, 106. 14 
1,933.75 
2,619.13 
932.66 
72.36 
5,944.55 
2,645.66 

12,32L46 



2,778.36 
8,379.27 

762.60 
2,713.49 

954.46 
3,496.43 
3,453.81 
1,269.64 
2,199.01 
7,446.07 
12,332.65 
9,300.84 
2,876.08 
1,738.38 
2,612.40 
2,219.57 
1,268.93 
3, 139. 85 
1,633.61 

307. 62 
4,809.46 
1,321.33 
3,730.77 
4,289.25 
2,488.86 
2,863.67 
6,425.07 
2,957.36 
6,409.33 
1, 161. 97 

608.59 
9,209.61 

963.87 

950.00 
4,188.67 

659.06 
1,991.99 
1,029.52 
7,079.60 
1,464.60 
1,526.80 
4,611.92 
6,233.76 
1,076.62 
4,693.23 
5,047.32 
95,834.30 
1,586.81 
3,861.61 
2,628.18 

688.44 
3,408.81 
2,231.60 
4,611.06 
2,361.66 
2,973.77 
3,263.11 
1, 162. 67 
3,283.41 
10,670.75 



349,426.16 



12,392.63 
1,738.36 
3,538.89 

475.47 
1,412.03 
3,331.17 
8,240.22 
1,643.42 
2,969.29 

731.83 

667.28 
10,369.07 
2,230.48 
3,364.89 

670.32 
9,032.66 
4,418.94 
1,444.32 
1,521.32 

968.42 

700.44 
1,334.87 

982. 15 

1,433.82 

6,399.33 

4,982.21 

12, 180. 62 

697.09 
1,132.06 
1,862.87 

461.84 
3,057.71 
4,456.65 
1,844.53 

207.36 
1,453.23 
2,069.77 

866.75 
1,483.60 

274.85 
3,752.79 
3,610.07 
1,069.98 
4,281.60 
1,016.74 

684.13 
8,023.33 

609.41 

294.14 
f, 694. 26 

406.76 
1,040.67 

821. 21 
206,736.98 

979.44 
635.90 

426. 22 
23,770.30 

410. 18 
1, 126. 64 
2,715.75 
74,610.80 
2,736.32 
1,701.93 

486. 14 
1,308.20 
1,139.43 

817.60 
2, 118. 89 
2, 169. 84 
2,483.02 
1, 114. 33 

813. 28 
2,428.92 
1,260.36 



470,914.11 



121,408.42 
19,212.81 
41,854.18 
10,365.96 
17,510.77 
28,760.67 
166,836.21 
29,687.29 
26,796.40 
9,224.83 
10,056.94 
94,945.47 
26,876.87 
86,995.40 
17,690.78 
36,844.30 
67,979.66 
9,634.41 
24,996.«8 
11,312.40 
26,113.38 
30,138.29 
10,516.21 
14,138.46 
63,850.64 
65,911.06 
79,666.26 
24,813.47 
13,502.81 
20,6ui.23 
17,264.57 
16,042.98 
72,192.61 
15,661.98 
13, 186. 19 
44,616.11 
43,065.42 
20,943.37 
29,834.57 
14,287.66 
17,362.46 
33,288.67 
12,901.98 
4^.665.94 
16,431.66 
14,145.44 

141,613.02 
10,827.44 
9,697.58 
29.414.69 
6,960.12 
26,056.41 
14,991.06 

669,631.63 
11, 643. 53 
12,397.73 
26,776.16 

171,746.36 
11, 117. 16 
60,710.89 
48,029.36 

870,627.32 
14,994.20 
24,686.88 
30,080.08 
14,110.86 
26,724.49 
11,643.78 
41, 188. 74 

24,440.04 

44,312.76 

60,050.30 

7,074.09 

40,363.17 
66,636.64 



4,019,046.20 



-13 



190 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. S.— Statement of unexpendahle property owned by the municipalities of 
Porto Rico, for the period from July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920. 



Municipalities. 


Balance July 
1, 1919. 


Increase dur- 
ing period. 


Decrease dur- 
ing period. 


Balance June 
30, 1920. 


Adjuntas 


$6,711.28 
2,146.62 
5,573.47 
4,411.01 

54,360.14 

3, 489. 24 

210,713.00 

51,354.46 

12,334.94 

19,556.66 
6,729.90 

48,073.65 

28,624.29 
105,526.20 

12,579.22 
6, 835. 45 

87,506.78 
2,904.19 

45,739.76 
3, 185. 15 

79, 896. 81 

30,907.88 

4,663.90 

5,066.81 

132,896.92 

22, 134. 62 
169,217.46 

22,063.35 
1,247.76 

40, 559. 66 

4,333.05 

5,076.24 

217, 134. 76 

6,510.97 

937.35 

33,372.85 

65,353.59 

20,417.60 

74,563.62 
4, 176. 50 
3,022.67 

30,884.88 
1,365.80 

16,885.34 

29,922.61 
14,983.29 
341,446.50 
3,329.68 
3,525.75 
11,301.52 
6,89L48 

26,127.96 
18,787.53 
2,048,355.23 
5,814.13 
9, 140. 45 
8,489.10 
55,592.11 
3,856.35 
67,913.48 
48,967.21 

713,216.05 

13,794.05 

45,702.87 

17,748.78 

9,644.74 

9,24.3.96 

3,908 87 

55,236.70 

15,406.96 

44,059.7.:$ 

61,265.58 

189.25 

55,770.88 

1.50,284.65 


$21,986.18 

18,886.77 

40,534.29 

8,681.86 

20,750.30 

36,593.07 

203,294.08 

25,390.91 

23,044.82 

14,562.84 

18,107.99 

49,146.28 

24,259.36 

53,909.92 

30,545.26 

30,057.96 

74,816.06 

3,962.95 

22,842.03 

9, 861. 45 

34,602.32, 

22, 191. 28 

13,558.45 

8,174.35 

86,889.20 

30,253.12 

69, 773. 65 

21,059.72 

6, 193. 65 

10,005.33 

14,975.77 

3,980.13 

66,573.48 

12,459.87 

4,283.01 

61,346.79 

28,921.73 

29,294.33 

22,883.30 

19,041.34 

10,036.47 

20,352.34 

23,551.35 

38,063.29 

20, 161. 84 

10,615.54 

195,395.16 

12,407.11 

5,919.64 

33, 156. 96 

6,243.25 

14,330.48 

10,074.85 

633,713.39 

13,412.09 

11,707.28 

34,279.43 

80,859.63 

17,759.87 

54,984.05 

39,720.93 

1,019,557.29 

12,296.96 

21,422.59 

51, 810. 44 

19,502.75 

20,395.04 

9,610.89 

41,033.29 

21, 196. 73 

19,469.91 

48,441.27 

1,569.99 

28,038.25 

70,271.54 


$8.50 


$28,688.96 


AsTuada 


21,033.39 


Aeuadilift 




46,107.76 


Aguas Buenas 


7.40 
2.00 
595.85 
884.28 
793.86 
2.00 
259.00 


13,085.47 


Aibonito. . 


75, 108. 44 


Anasco 


39,486.46 


Arecibo 


413, 122. 80 


Arroyo. 


75,951.51 


Barceloneta 


35,377.76 


BJEuranquitas 


33,860.50 


BaiTos 


24,837.89 


BayftTnon . . . 


165. 61 
196.26 
747. 70 
1,084.62 
179. 11 
183.19 
166.00 


97,054.32 


Ca6o Roio 


52,687.39 


Caguas '. 


158,688.42 


Camuy. . . 


42,039.86 


Carolina 


36, 714. .30 


Cavev.. 


162, 139. 65 


Ceiba 


6, 701. 14 


Ciales 


68,581.79 


Cidra.. . 


351. 29 

57.00 

949.86 


12,Q95.31 


Coamo 


114,442.13 


CoTTierio . . . . 


52,149.3a 


Corozal 


18,222.35 


Dorado 


8.50 

868.69 

18.00 

120.83 

2.00 


13,232.66 


Fajardo 


218,917.43 


Guanica 


52,369.74 


Guftyarna . . 


238,870.28 


Guayanilla 


43,121.07 




7,441.41 


Gurabo 


972.06 
101.00 


49,592.93 


Hatillo 


19,207.82 




9, 056. .37 


HuTnacao 




283,708.24 


Isabela. 


161.34 


18,809.50 




5,220.36 


Juana Diaz 


388.29 


94,331.35 




94,275.32 


Ij^ias. J^V.V//.' V^V/ "".... .......... . 


97.83 


49,614.10 




97, 446. 92 


Las Marias 


186.50 
133.98 
304. 24 

27.72 

213. 94 

1, 190. 15 

76.20 
580.72 

80.97 
167.90 
343.95 


23,031.34 


Las Fiedras 


12,925.16 


Loiza 


50,932.98 


Luquillo 


24,889.43 


Manati 


54,734.69 


Maricao 


48,894.30 


Maunabo 


25,522.63 


Mayaguez 


536,260.94 


Moca 


15,655.82 


Morovis • 


9,277.49 


Naguabo 


44,114.53 


Naranlito 


13, 134. 73 


Patillas 




40,458.44 


Penuelas 


108.50 

11,000,026.00 

17.65 

155.95 

5.60 

151.00 


28,753.88 


Ponce . 


1,582,042.62 


Quebradillas 


19,208.57 


Rincon 


20,691.78 


Rio Grande - • 


42,762.93 


Rio Fiedras 


136,300.74 


aoVkona Grandp 


21,616.22 


Salinas 


451.90 
20.00 
. 8,988.16 
161. 18 
141.33 
276.20 


122,445.63 


San German 


88,668.14 


San Juan 


1,723,785.18 


San Lorenzo 


25,929.83 


San Sebastian 


66,984.13 


Santa Isabel 


69,283.02 


Toa Alta 


29, 147. 49 


Toa Baja 


97.70 


29,541.30 


Tniiillo Alto 


13, 519. 76 


Utuado 


39.49 


96,230.50 


VAffft Alta 


36,603.69 


Va<7A BniA 




63,529 64 


Vieques 


59.00 


109,647.85 


Villalba 


1,759.24 
8:^,436.40 


Yabucoa 


432. 73 
622. 26 


Yauco 


219,933.93 






Total 


5,610,963.25 


3,869,117.09 


1 1,024,432.99 


8,455,647.35 







1 Of this amount, $1,000,000 represents the correction of an error in addition in the original inventory. 



REPORT OF THE AUDITOR. 



19X 



Tablp: No. 4. — Statement of receipts and disbursements of the various school boards of 
Porto Rico for the period from July 1, 1919, to Oct. SI, 1919. 



RECEIPTS. 



School boards. 



Balance 

Julyl, 

1919. 



School 
fund. 



School tax. 



Miscel- 
laneous. 



TotaL 



Adjuntas 

Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Aguas Buenas... 

Aibonito 

Afiasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Bayamon 

CaboRojo 

Caeuas 

Camuy 

Carolina 

Cayey 

Coiba 

Ciales , 

Cidra 

Coaino 

Comerio 

Corozal , 

Dorado 

Fajardo 

Guanica 

Guayama 

Giiayanilla 

Guaynabo , 

Gurabo 

Hatillo 

Hormigueros 

Hiunacao 

Isabela 

Jayuya 

JuanaDiaz 

Juncos 

Lajas 

Lares 

Las Marias 

Las Piedras 

Loiza 

Luquillo 

Manati 

Maricao 

Maunabo 

Mayaguez 

Moca 

Morovis 

Naguabo 

Naranjito 

Patillas 

Pefiuelas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas 

Rincon 

Rio Grande 

RioPeidras 

Sabana Grande. 

Salinas 

San German 

San Juan 

San Lorenzo — 
San Sebastian . . 
Santa Isabel — 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

TrujilloAlto.... 

Utuado : . . 

Vega Alta 

Veea Baja 

Vieques 

Villalba 

Yabucoa 

Yauco 



13,841.10 
2, 176. 71 

437. 56 
' 676.31 
1,194.51 
1,533.28 
9,557.41 
2,328.02 
4,093.10 

954.30 

384.72 
3,207.33 
1,407.18 
1,22L31 

967. 19 

3. 172. 85 
2,505.61 
1,171.58 
1,523.90 
1,016.36 
1,514.98 
1,973.30 

737.41 

6. 892. 86 
6,225.65 

33,153.31 
5,436.57 
2, 886. 43 

644.09 

218.59 
3, 199. 55 
6,256.49 

936.81 

683.80 
1,135.22 
12, 732. 18 
1,901.89 
4, 173. 06 
3,411.70 
4,039.07 
2,103.12 
3, 153. 65 

926.97 
1,721.05 

540. 50 

598. 78 
2,719.27 
1,540.15 

295. 29 
1,507.20 

581.69 
2, 155. 26 
1,105.57 
9,879.58 

531.81 

515. 23 
3,831.62 
14,220.18 

694.90 

8,257.01 

2, 125. 19 

73,476.77 

543.71 
5, 124. 04 
6, 132. 12 
1,953.72 
1,897.71 
1,875.24 
3,289.06 
2,578.87 
3,046.95 
4,010.61 
2,204.81 
1, 143. 68 

856. 29 



S2,022.54 

1,043.02 

1,659.04 

760. 62 

1,303.82 

1,574.78 

7, 195. 12 

1,260.27 

1,073.92 

762. 71 

1,064.54 

2,889.38 

2, 832. 19 

4,630.21 

1,584.58 

1,859.17 

2,300.30 

755. 58 

2,296.95 

952. 02 

2,017.55 

2, 135. 33 

592. 20 

1,087.26 

717.06 

686.96 

3,584.76 

868. 33 

549.09 

754. 07 

1,482.02 

850.48 

1,564.48 

1,716.74 

1,088.54 

1,845.82 

673. 27 

1,837.75 

2,274.44 

933.04 

460.20 

1,794.22 

821.02 

2, 894. 02 

650. 11 

859. 73 

6,966.39 

517. 72 

998.69 

1,364.11 

507. 14 

i; 670. 19 

1,498.98 

13,270.27 

921. 06 

379.24 

1,688.62 

3,795.96 

630.83 

2,309.07 

2,695.97 

28,303.82 

1,408.14 

1,037.21 

1,348.60 

677. 82 

1,336.48 

1,068.36 

2, 743. 96 

674.20 

722. 70 

628. 45 

596. 04 

2,159.13 

2,544.61 



$900. 63 

900. 05 
578. 58 
338. 10 
608. 75 
730. 72 

3,271.88 

278. 31 

493. 28 

333. 28 

490.64 

1,349.89 

1,309.36 

2,033.35 

704.69 

442.06 

1,022.99 

362. 10 

1,018.16 

430. 82 

936. 13 

959. 69 
263. 80 
483.22 

736. 60 
305. 31 

1,601.11 
395. 41 
255. 46 
51.67 
755.11 
379. 52 
739. 39 

777. 27 
491. 90 
821.96 
327. 10 
916. 82 

1,080.07 
376. 01 

205. 70 

796. 45 
501.99 

1,286.38 
256. 31 
382. 10 

3,734.77 
240. 59 
443.86 
913. 48 

260. 46 
742. 34 
666.21 

6,340.70 
409.36 

236. 28 
750.49 

1,852.62 

306.09 

1,027.53 

1,199.62 

12,691.99 

394. 71 
531. 01 
606.14 
313. 88 

594. 06 
355.17 

1,273.43 

306. 72 
349. 92 
234. 86 
2fi4. 89 

959. 61 
1,182.40 



$46. 10 

12.09 

1,497.85 

7.11 

14.93 

98.46 

100.61 

19.67 

40.27 

5.26 

2.27 

60.36 

7.14 

100.86 

9.71 

34.33 

230. 07 

16.34 

19.01 

10.90 

86.88 

9.67 

92.73 

34.24 

71.98 

330. 06 

739. 17 

34.38 

6.72 

4.21 

33.27 

38.64 

9.80 

3.78 

16.36 

159. 13 

9.60 

41.79 

106.96 

84,79 

20.41 

39.13 

11.78 

23.10 

9.49 

8.49 

233. 16 

32.11 

3.77 

16.42 

6.91 

30.00 

63.47 

373. 63 

16.66 

65.03 

36.87 

145. 33 

8.03 

44,26 

19.71 

1,324.44 

30.29 

54.71 

41.30 

20.40 

36.41 

19.38 

106.89 

26.28 

34.83 

395. 52 

14.83 

53. 04 

154. 46 



$6, 810. 37 
4, 133. 37 
4, 173. 03 
1,782.24 
3, 122. 01 
3,937.24 

20, 126. 02 
3,886.17 
6,700.57 
2,065.65 
1,942.17 
7, 606. 96 
6,556.87 
7,986.73 
3,266.17 
6,508.41 
6,068.97 
2,306.60 
4,867.92 
2,410.10 
4,656.64 
6,077.99 
1,686.14 
8,497.68 
7,751.29 

34,476.64 

11,361.61 
4, 184. 65 
1,466.36 
1,028.64 
6,469.95 
7,525.13 
3,260.48 
3, 181. 59 
2,731.01 

15,559.09, 
2,911.86 
6,969.42 
6,872.16 
6,433.81 
2,789.43 
6,783.45 
2,261.76 
5,924.65 
1,466.41 
1,849.10 

13. 653. 68 
2,330.67 
1,741.60 
3,800.21 
1,366.19 
4,697.79 
3,324.23 

29,864.18 
1,877.88 
1,185.78 
6,307.60 

20,014.09 
1,639.86 

11,637.87 
6,040.49 
116,797.02 
2,376.86 
6,746.97 
8,128.16 
2,966.82 
3,864.65 
3,318.15 
7,413.34 
3,686.07 
4,164.40 
5, im. 44 
3,080.67 
4,316.46 
4,737.75 



Total 308,660.89 



158, 924. 61 72, 863. 17 I 7, 744. tO 



648,193.47 



192 



EEPORT or THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 4. — Statement of receipts and disbursements of the variom school boards of 
Porto Rico for the period from July 1, 1919, to Oct. 31, iPiP— Continued. - 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



School boards. 


Salaries. 


Rent of 
school 
houses. 


Purchases 
of unex- 
pendable 
property. 


Purchases 

of 
supplies. 


Miscella- 
neous. 


Total. 


Adjuntas. ,..,. 


$322.77 
210.34 
451. 10 
136.03 
196.93 
376.22 

1,460.29 
283.04 
434.45 
115.44 
191.72 

1,057.39 
611.08 
9n.83 
405. 44 
368.94 
4U.40 
96.43 
377.34 
164.27 
388.83 
532.83 
160.40 
206.20 

1, 181. 68 
470. 46 

1,005.43 
388.45 
181. 49 
248.58 
230.09 
217. 01 
491.92 
212.94 
167. 64 
658.84 
478. 42 
388.48 
554.81 
420. 41 

• 201.26 
482.02 
147. 38 
624.68 
284.60 
208.31 

1,921.75 
195.92 
125.20 
279.98 
51.58 
310.04 
229.22 

3,027.89 
112.29 
226.89 
317.84 
876.96 
160.21 

1,108.60 
666.66 

7,341.25 
153.69 
402.96 
945.38 
208.22 
486.69 
220. 74 
456.84 
320.20 
428.23 

1,098.17 

31.93 

441. 46 

663.72 


$748.00 
376.00 
580.00 
190. 00 
400.00 
530.00 

1,292.00 
310.00 
615. 50 
248.00 
368.00 

1,567.00 

1,164.00 

2,539.00 
98.00 
656.00 
538.00 
320.00 
634.00 
412.00 
887.00 
488.00 
161.00 
489.30 
695.00 
489.24 

1,303.00 
457.60 
477.60 
412.00 
142.00 
262.00 
442.00 
502.00 
636.00 
414.00 
652.00 
426.00 
864.32 
416.33 
346.00 
792.00 
224.00 
960.00 
333.00 
264.00 
230.00 
380.00 
312.00 
436.00 
144.00 
642.00 
574.00 

2,126.00 
298.00 
312.00 
572.00 
610.00 
446.00 
288.00 

1,097.00 

1,840.00 
484.00 
846.00 
32.00 
226.00 
692.00 
260.00 

1,108.00 
188.00 
556.33 


$196.40 
429.73. 
689.42 
412.69 
27.60 
118.34 

2,343.19 
431.46 
682.74 
138.00 
420.65 

2,456.03 
433.65 
439.40 

1,37L65 
190.17 

1,004.89 
56.70 
942.32 
8L23 
796.26 
855.83 
193. 10 
898.20 

4,271.19 

8,428.72 

2,640.62 
648.65 
140. 75 
31.65 
779.91 

2,089.89 

909.25 

183.60 

97.53 

2,773.18 
3.40 

1,282.17 

1,108.68 

3,715.33 
547.97 

2,958.84 

626.58 

628.92 

251.65 

61.30 

6,692.90 
560.02 
593.26 

1,115.44 


$392.43 

84.69 
411.74 

43.07 
114.98 
409.55 
1,699.39 
187.61 
365.69 

81.70 
189.44 
626.57 
236. 72 
592. 50 
232. 50 
284. 12 
338.14 
105.48 
347.15 

69.05 
367.25 
160.21 
573. 40 
360.76 
413. 69 
674.37 
936.45 
325. 19 
232.86 
105.91 
138.64 
143. 40 
203.66 
330.72 
103. 68 
302.62 
196.16 
477.81 
325.83 
226.86 
162. 64 
652.22 
111.91 
517.98 
262.31 

41.23 
641.94 

55.99 
141.69 
124.41 

12.25 

229.60 

.84.10 

1,790.93 

71.70 

77.03 
267.06 
513.84 

71.16 

218.44 

628. 18 

2,020.06 

101.60 

468.09 

12L20 

494.30 

1,633.29 

134.86 

666.32 

280. 47 

297.40 

1,723.67 

47.45 
544.60 
617. 43 


$246.68 

548.18 

210.88 

394.93 

640.71 

1,689.77 

6,498.98 

321.82 

557.11 

182. 70 

231.83 

880.23 

280.71 

1,096.48 

1,08L16 

1,329.25 

2,725.45 

102.58 

568.66 

213. 13 

448.84 

947. 52 

399. 61 

158.74 

607.82 

1,277.65 

954.10 

331.65 

112.95 

222.25 

769. 46 

281.81 

1,203.05 

238.98 

234. 87 

497. 52 

1,156.94 

1,215.71 

1,705.28 

621. 21 

197. 76 

303.00 

385.99 

812.92 

293. 42 

449.62 

5,230.09 

150.57 

154.94 

1,221.06 

119.63 

200.77 

228.39 

14,032.02 

m.83 

347.43 

267.99 

1,085.28 

167.16 

1, 175. 30 

655.24 

22,690.85 

534.40 

649.61 

1, 152. 50 

138.48 

613.62 

212. 13 

1,563.94 

1,001.21 

608.48 

638.02 

107.37 

416. 12 

962.99 


$1,906.28 


Aguada 


1,648.84 


Aeaadilla 


2,343.14 


Aguas Buenas 


1,176.72 


Aibonito 


1,280.22 


Afiasco 


3,023.88 


Arecibo 


12,293.85 


Arroyo 


1,533.93 


Barceloneta 


2.655.49 


Barranqiiltas 


765.84 


Barros 


1,401.64 


Bayamon - 


6,487.22 


Cabo Rojo 


2,626.16 


Caguas 


5,679.21 


fJftniiiy ...-. 


3,188.65 


Carolina 


2,828.48 


Cayey 


6,017.88 


Ceiba 


681. 19 


dales 


2,869.47 


Cidra 


929.68 


Coamo 


2,888.18 


Comerio 


2,984.39 


Corosal 


1,487.51 


Dorado 


2,113.20 


Fajardo 


7,169.38 


Guanica 


11,240.44 


Ouayama . 


6,839.60 


Guayanilla 


2, 151. 54 


Guaynabo 


1,145.55 


Gurabo 


1,020.29 


Hatillo 


2,060.10 


HonnJgueros 


2,994.11 


Humacao 


3,249.88 


Isabela 


1,469.24 


Jayuya 


1,239.62 


Jiiana Diaz 


4,646.16 


Juncos 


2,486.92 


Lajas.... 


3,790.17 


Lares 


4,558.92 


Las Marias 


5,400.14 


Las Piedras 


1,455.63 


Loiza 


5,188.08 


Luquillo 


1,495.86 


Manati 


3,644.50 


Maricao 


1,424.98 


Maiinabo 


1,014.46 


Mavaeniez 


13,686.68 


Moca 


1,342.50 


Morovls 


1,327.09 


Naguabo 


3,176.89 


Naranlito 


327.46 


Patillas 


608.42 

253.81 

2,627.77 

150. 53 

189. 96 

1,439.67 

1,332.16 


1,890.83 


PoQuelas 


1,369.52 


Ponce 


23,604.61 


Onebradlllfts ...,.,,-,-.- 


804.35 


^incon 


1,153.31 


"Rio Grande -.-t-- 


2,854.66 


Hio Piedras 


4,418.24 


fiaKan A Grande 


844. 13 


"Salinas 


2,217.52 
879.04 
12,014.43 
20.00 
467.60 
981. 15 
995.87 
343.10 

1,203.76 
417.74 
118.35 
602.76 

2,809.68 
89.81 

1,648.42 

1,819.46 


5,007.86 


"flan German ....,.-.., -^-- 


3,626.11 


San Juan 


45.806.69 


'San Lorenzo 


1,293.59 


San Sftbastivi. ...^ 


2,834.26 


Santa Isabel 


3,232.23 


Toa Alta 


2,062.87 


Toa B aja 


3,668.60 


Trujillo Alto 


2,031.48 


Utuado 


4,112.84 


VegaAlta 


1,908.23 


VegaBaja 


2,293.19 


Vieques 


5,169.44 


VlUalba II!.! 


394.00 

1,213.00 

660.00 


670.56 


Yabucoa 


4,263.50 


Yaaco 


4,603.60 


Total... 


41,727.01 


43,977.12 


90,74L64 


27.619.04 


90,617.23 


294,582.04 







REPORT OF THE AUDITOR. 



193 



Table No. 6.— Statement of unexpendahle property owned by the school boards of Porto 
Ricojor the period from July 1, 1919, to Oct, SI, 1919, 



School boards. 


Balance July 
1, 1919. 


Increase dur- 
ing period. 


Decrease dur- 
ing period. 


Balance Oct. 
31, 1919. 


Adjuntas 


$21,873.43 
18,819.52 
25, 578. 54 

7,954.52 
20,230.27 
29,387.37 
145,910.13 
23,067.48 
16,072.48 
14,215.58 
17,411.08 
18, 138. 81 
23, 615. 50 
49,506.62 
29, 172. 83 
28,091.83 
62,388.18 

3, 803. 00 
19,663.85 

7,64L00 
33,490.90 
20,213.77 
12,261.99 

6,550.38 
60,981.95 
27,502.68 
57,904.82 
18,490.41 

4,654.55 

8,024.93 
13, 558. 13 

1, 653. 21 
65,640.67 
12,217.85 

2,973.41 
52,673.73 
13,633.22 
27,576.80 
21,641.02 
15,249.34 

7,352.54 
16, 577. 67 

3,895.94 
36, 119. 15 
19,459.07 
10,553.57 
197,651.67 
10, 682. 71 

4,985.46 
27,275.24 

6, 144. 20 
12,5^.77 

7,604,43 

505, 969. 56 

12, 179. 85 

11,027.08 

32,509.12 

73. 842. 27 
17,311.22 
47,229.15 
39,013.40 

796,498.71 
12,013.49 
20,670.46 
50,367.53 
17, 928. 75 
16,096.41 
8, 663. 15 
35,582.88 
16, 638. 40 
8, 745. 03 

43. 632. 28 
1,100.01 

25,667.29 
60, 760. 62 


$47.40 


$25.65 


$21,895,18- 


Aguada . . . 


18, 819. 52 


Aguadilla 




6.50 


26, 572. or 


A^uas Buenas 


412. 14 
253.37 

1,302.55 

3,934.38 
333. 52 

5, 676. 44 
142.00 
411.40 
28,066.85 
211.97 
441.40 

1,269.49 


8, 366. 66* 


Aibonito. 




20, 483. 64t 


Anasco. 




30, 689. 92.' 


Arecibo... 




149, 844. Bt 


Arroyo 




2.3,401.00 


Barceloneta . . 




21, 748. 92 


Barranquitas 




14,357.58 


Barro.s 


37.86 
117.00 


17, 784. 62 


Bavamon 


46,088.66 


Cabo Rojo 


23, 827. 47 


Caguas :. ... 


2.00 
402.01 

4.50 
581. 45 
60.35 


49,946.02 


Camuy 


30,040.31 


Carolina 


28,087.33 


Cayev. . . 


1,576.79 
45.25 
845. 72 
81.23 
743. 51 
852.33 

1, 103. 80 
537.36 

1,431.25 

1, 549. 52 

2, 692. 52 

1,113.18 

163. 95 

31. 55 

706. 20 

318.00 

1, 139. 70 
163.55 
308. 74 

2, 773. 18 

3.40 

924.85 

861.35 

3,629.00 
512. 46 

2, 822. 71 

18,965.69 

796. 71 

186.65 

28.00 

6,305.04 
539. 66 
527. 40 
237.05 

437.'1!6' 


63,383.52 


Ceiba 


3, 787. 90 


Ciales . . . 


20, 509. 57 


Cidra... 




7, 722. 23 


Coamo 


24.00 


34,210.41 


Coinerio. . 


21, 066. 10 


Corozal . 




13,365.79 


Dorado 




7,087.74 


Fajardo. 




62, 333. 20 


Guanica 


228. 14 
50.00 


28,824.06 


Guayama 


60,547.34 


Guayanilla.. .... 


19, 603. 59 


Guaynabo 




4,818.50 


Gurabo . 




8, 056. 48 


Hatillo... 




14,264.33 
1,971.21 


Hormigueros 




Humacao ... ... 


1,121.23 

'""135.92' 

5.00 


65, 659. 14 


Isabela 


12,381.40 


Jayuya . 


3, 146. 23 


Juana Diaz 


55,441.91 


Juncos - . 


13,636.62 
28, 428. 73 


Lajas . . 


72.92 
371.30 


Lares 


22,131.07 


Las Marias. 


18,878.34 
7, 703. 57 


Las Piedras 


161.43 


Loiza 


19, 400. 38 
22, 624. 65 


Luquillo 


236.98 
28.33 


Manati 


36,887.53 


Maricao.. 


19,645.72 
10,335.29 


Maunabo 


246. 28 
13,324.83 


Mayaguez.. 


190,631.88 


Moca. . . 


11,222 37 


Morovis 


2.00 

58.00 

262.40 

36.47 


5, 510. 86 


Naguabo 


27, 454. 29 


Naranjito 


. 5,882*40 


Patilla^ 


13,000.80 


Penuelas 


•7,604.43 

505,969.56 

12,290.09 

11,077.23 


Ponce 






Quebradillas 


110.24 

98.15 

1,244.21 

1,224.00 

162. 75 
2,098.75 

707.53 
316,438.05 

100.62 
7,354.01 
1, 103. 70 
1,123.05 
2,313.13 

491. 49 
3,567.42 

118.35 

468. 25 

3,717.25 

90.48 

1,70.T01 

697.50 




Rincon 


48.00 
403. 76 
545. 47 


Rio Grande 


33, 349. 57 


Rio Piedras.. 


74, 520. 80 


Sabana Grande 


17, 473. 97 


Salinas 


si.is 


49,296.72 

39,720.93 

987, 402. 72 


San German 


San .Tuan 


125,534.04 


San Lorenzo. 


12, 114. 11 


San Sebastian 


7,607.25 
146.37 
27.25 
80.00 


20, 417. 22 


Santa Isabel ... .... 


51,324.86 
19,024.55 


Toa Alta 


Toa Baja 


18,329.54 


TrujilloAlto . . 


9, 154. 64 
39, 110. 75 


Utuado 


39.55 


Vega Alta . ... 


16,756.75 
9,213.28 


Vega Baja 




Vieques . 




47, 349. 53 


Villalba 




1,180.49 


Yabucfta . 


334. 49 


27,035.81 
61,458.12 


Yuaco 






Total 


3,273,704.46 


442,389.65 


152,399.91 


3,563,694.20 





194 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

The result of the audit and settlement of the accounts of the 68 collectors of internal 
revenue and the 7 stamp agents is incorporated in the consolidated statements which 
follow. 

DIVISION OP EXAMINATIONS. 

During the fiscal year 1919-20 this division was again considerably hampered in 
carrying on its functions, due to the difficulty in keeping all the positions of examiners 
permanently filled. Only two of the eight positions of examiners assigned to this 
division were kept continuously filled throughout the year. On March 26, 1920, 
one of the most efficient members of this division was promoted to the position of 
chief of the division of audits, and five other changes took place during the year in 
the staff of examiners, due to resignations to accept outside positions with better 
inducements. Under the circumstances the best possible has been done, but it is 
evident that the compensation paid to examiners is at present entirely inadequate, 
as compared with that paid to other positions of less importance and with practically 
no responsibility, this being the reason why the services of outside men fully qualified 
can not be secured to perform the work required. 

This division, however, during the fiscal year 1919-20 thoroughly examined the 
accounts of 75 school boards, 30 municipalities, 4 district courts, 30 municipal courts, 
68 offices of collectors of internal revenue, and 7 offices of internal-revenue stamp 



A considerable part of the time was devoted to the examination of the 75 school 
boards of the island, which, in compliance with section 74 of the new municipal law, 
had^to be liquidated in order to transfer to the respective municipalities all funds, 
accounts, and properties. Although this section of the law provided that the work 
was to be carried out by a commission, it was practically done in its entirety by the 
members of this division, who visited all the school boards and made examinations 
of the accounts, covering periods from the previous examinations to the date on 
which the school boards ceased in their functions as separate bodies by virtue of 
the law. In every case, of course, the result of the Uquidation was submitted to 
the approval of the representatives of the municipahties and of the school boards. 

All the offices of collectors of internal revenue and of the internal-revenue stamp 
agents were examined « s usual twice during the fiscal year. 

The new accounting system and regulations for the municipalities, the preparation 
of which was carried out by this division in cooperation with the division of audits 
during the last four months of the fiscal year, was put in operation on July 1, 1920. 
All recommendations made by this division, based on the actual experience obtained 
from the examinations of the accounts of the municipalities and school boards, were 
embodied in the new accounting rules and regulations. These recommendations, 
as already stated in previous reports, tend not only to eliminate considerable dupli- 
cation of work, and consequently unnecessary loss of time, but will also facilitate 
the periodic examinations made by this division. 

The examiners are at present engaged in giving necessary instructions to the vari- 
ous municipal officials in putting into operation the new accounting system, and it is 
hoped that with the cooperation of all concerned the best results will be obtained. 

DIVISION OP PROPERTY ACCOUNTS. 

During the fiscal year 1919-20, 102 accountable property clerks rendered accounts 
directly to this office. Two new accounts, that of the bureau of elections and that 
of the office of the Historical Archives of Porto Rico, were set up during the past year. 

The total book value of property carried by these property clerks on June 30, 1920, 
amounted to 11,814,551.33, which represents unexpendable articles of a more or less 
permanent nature, such as furniture, instruments, machinery, automobiles, etc. 
This property is charged to property clerks as bills for same are received and this 
fact causes a discrepancy, amounting to the value of the property charged, but not 
paid for, between the records of this division and the general ledger. 

In determining articles to be charged among the different branches 20,609 bills 
were examined, with the result that $292,688.99 worth of property was charged. 

Two hundred and iorty-six inspections and condemnations of unexpendable prop- 
erty were made and $194,541.03 worth of condemned articles were credited as a result. 

My recommendation for a traveling property inspector to pertain exclusively to 
this division for the purpose of traveling to different points of the island checting 
accounts and instructing and assisting inexperienced property clerks to perform 
their duties satisfactorily is here repeated. 



REPORT OF THE AUDITOR. 



195 



Balance of unexpendahle property June 30, 1920. 



Agriculture and labor, office of the 

commissioner $4, 314. 89 

Office of the auditor of Porto Rico. . . . 11, 997. 37 

Blind asvjum 5, 019. 51 

Bovs' Charitv School 23, 608. 65 

Bureau of agriculture 4, 188. 65 

Bureau of labor 3, 777. 38 

Bureau of elections 1, 227. 97 

Bureau of translation 2, 080. 71 

Carnegie Library 32, 974. 24 

<'ivil ser\ice commission 3, 064. 24 

€ulebra Island , 535. 43 

Department of education: 

Books $408, 978. 08 

Property 84,570.22 

493, 548. 30 

Board of examiners 781. 36 

Office of the CKecutive secretary 22, 946. 98 

Executive mansion 6, 865. 27 

Experiment station 17, 880. 36 

Department of finance 44, 328. 60 

Girls' Charit V School 14, 810. 95 

Office of the governor 11, 146. 37 

Harbor board 1, 934. 86 

Harbor board, bulkhead 3, 250. 38 

Department of health: 

Books $2,460.54 

Property 71 , 212. 36 

73,672.90 

Historical Archive 1, 695. 20 

House of representatives: 

Books $1,457.11 

Property 7,112.36 

8,570.03 

Insane Asylum 11, 000. 49 

Interior department 301, 040. 13 

Irrigation service 97, 279. 16 

Insular police department 67, 705. 47 

Uniform insular police 9, 631. 70 

Insular forest service 2,709. 44 

National Guard 1, 237. 04 

Public service commission 2, 71 8. 86 

Secretary-reporter, supreme court: 

Books $39,059.50 

Property 2,194.78 

41,254.28 

Senate of Porto Rico 6, 576. 25 

Insular telegraph 32, 836. 99 

Institute of Tropical Medicines 7, 265. 67 

University of Rio Piedras: 

Books $20, 198. 98 

Property 37,455.77 

57,654.75 

University of Mayaguez: 

Books $6,633.34 

Property 56,512.36 

63, 145. 70 

Workmen's relief commission 3, 51 1. 92 

Weight and measures 9, 946. 97 

Bureau of supply, printing, and trans- 
portation: 

Own property $85, 449. 73 

Surplus property 19, 881. 56 

105,331.29 

Office of the attorney general: 

Books $24,627.66 

Property 9,996.37 

34,624.03 

Respectfully submitted, 



The Governor of Porto Rico, 

San Juan, Porto 



Supreme Court of Porto Rico: 

Books $39,987.90 

Property 9,079.16 

149,067.06 

District courts: 

Aguadilla 7, 090. 07 

Arecibo , 5,632.82 

Guayama * 7,108.46 

Humacao 6, 709. 80 

Mavaguez 6, 250. 44 

Ponce 8, 242. 66 

San Juan 9, 985. 20 

Municipal courts: 

Adjuntas 663. 00 

Aguadilla 86Q. 72 

Anasco 517. 47 

Arecibo 894. 14 

Barros 688.03 

Bayamon 1, 370. 10 

Bayamonjo 61 6. 43 

Caguas 875. 05 

Camuy 708. 24 

Carolina 625. 26 

Cayey 779.56 

Ciales 569. 07 

Coamo 452.12 

Fajardo 701. 76 

Guayama 908. 21 

Humacao 761. 71 

Juana Diaz 569. 41 

Lares 511. 74 

Manati 803. 48 

Mayaguez 707. 73 

Patillas 503. 20 

Ponce 1,417.66 

Rio Grande 458. 80 

Rio Piedras 561. 56 

Salinas 657. 69 

San German 678. 56 

San Juan 1, 746. 70 

San Sebastian 642. 60 

Utuado 919. 32 

Vega Baja -. 680. 28 

Vieques 574. 66 

Yabocoa , 637. 27 

Yauco 698. 70 

Registrar of property: 

Aguadilla 798.76 

Arecibo 916. 44 

Caguas 892. 20 

Guayama 915. 49 

Humacao 915. 78 

Mayaguez 512. 94 

Ponce 807. 76 

San German 656. 08 

San Juan (Sec. I) 982. 66 

San Juan (Sec. II) 731. 98 

District jails: 

Aguadilla 764.11 

Arecibo 2, 564. 91 

Guayama 857. 67 

Humacao '. . . 1, 171. 80 

Mayaguez 1,988. 13 

Ponce 1,988. 48 

San Juan l, 705. 88 

Penitentiary of Porto Rico 9, 651. 79 

Reform school of Porto Rico 11, 667. 41 

Total 1,814,661.33 



J. W. Bonner, 
Auditor of Porto Rico. 



Rico. 



1,308,879.00 



$9,016,687.18 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 

Exhibit No. 1. — Statement of assets and liahilities as of June SO, 1920. 

Current assets: 

Cash in banks (see Exhibit No. 24) $4,916,684.03 

Remittancein transit (see Exhibit No. 24)...'. 989,675.55 

Municipal and school board bonds owned (see Exhibit No. 9) 1 1, 442, 000. 00 

Accounts receivable $228, 425.22 

Less reserve for departmental accounts payable to bureau 
of supplies 97,057.98 

131,367.24 

Bond-redemption fund: 

Cash in banks (included in "Cash in banks" above) 

(see Exhibit No. 14) 1,304,318.91 

Taxes uncollected - 4,560.09 

Materials and supplies '152,' 264. 65 

Delinquent taxes, fiscal years 1901-2 to 1919-20 (see Exhibit No. 19) 66, 712 03 

Outstanding collections in arrears 6,793.62 

Irrigation revenues 1,311.06 

Deferred assets: 

Loans to municipalities (see Exhibit No. 6) $75, 824 . 75 

Less reserve for municipal loan account 1,000.00 

74, 824. 75 

Loans to school boards (see Exhibit No. 7) 666 66 

School-building construction (see Exhibit No. 8) 23,876.09 

Invested assets: 

Road and bridge construction (see Exhibit No. 10) 9, 581, 978. 31 

Real estate (see Exhibit No. 11) 5,123,597.68 

Public buildings (see Exhibit No. 12) 1,923,530.14 

Irrigation works 4,929,426.57 

Harbor improvements 588,384.01 

Telegraph and telephone lines 161,466.02 

Furniture and equipment $1, 558, 250. 68 

Less reserve for depreciation 846,274.06 . 

711,976.62 

23, 020, 369. 35 

Trust-fund reserve account: 

Road bond fund of 1916 700,236.67 

Irrigation fund 136, 711.30 

Construction of harbor improvements at San Juan 3, 704 . 05 

San Juan Harbor fund 11,615.99 

Securities, refunding bonds fund 1, 179, 500. 00 

Securities, loan fund 301, 000. 00 



99,367.50 



2,332,768.01 



100,249.55 



Discount on bonds: 

Public improvement bonds 33, 657. 00 

Refunding bonds 18,852.77 

Road bonds of 1916 47,739.78 

University of Porto Rico (see Exhibit No. 15) 372,'69Lid 

Total 34,941,122.75 

Current liabiUties: 

Audited vouchers 1,262,223.98 

Unclaimed wages 1,649.93 

Franchise deposits 1, 395. 57 

Bureau of supplies, accounts payable 131,042.65 

Notes payable 300,000.00 

Surplus of irrigation service from operation under provisions of temporary 

irrigation districts 350,473.68 

Deferred liabilities: 

Expenses accrued not pa id 4, 884. 85 

Municipalities, tax account 408, 707.92 

Special deposits 79,836.49 



'2,046,785.81 



Contingent liabilities: 

Cash bond deposits 5, 684. 86 

Taxes paid under protest 68,344.08 



493, 429. 2& 

74,028.94 

Trust-fund liabilities (see Exhibit No, 13) 4,553,692.26 

Bonded debt (see Exhibit No. 14) 10,264,000.00 

Premiums on bonds 36,804.63 

Trustees, University of Porto Rico (see Exhibit No. 16) 372,691.1ft 

Excess of assets over liabilities (see Exhibit No. 2) 17,099,690.70 

Total 34,941,122.75 

1 Carried as cash by treasurer in accordance with act No. 120, approved July 26, 1913. 
196 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 197 

Exhibit No. 2. — Account of the People of Porto Rico for the fiscal year ending June 30y 

1920. 

Surplus of July 1, 1919 116,297,644.83 

Net surplus for current year (see Exhibit No. 3) f 259,379.60 

Additions to real estate 120,180.77 

Additions to inventory of miscellaneous property 645.06 

Addition to insular bond redemption 220, 268. 95 

Sale of Insular government property 9,454.87 

Income of previous years 176, 236. 53 

Sundry adjustments 112,999. 71 

Surplus, Insular police uniform 38. 36 

Total 17,196,748.68 

Departmental accounts due bureau of supplies, printing and transportation, expenses un- 
distributed 97,057.98 

Excess of assets over liabilities 17,099,690.70 

Total 17,196,748.68 

Exhibit No. 3. — Income account for the year ending June SO, 1920. 

Insularrevenues (see Exhibit No. 4) $7,026,316.73 

Insular expenses (see Exhibit No. 5): 

Current year expenses 16,329, 408. 49 

Depreciation of lumiture and equipment, current year 163, 661. 86 

6,493,070.35 

Surplus of current year 533, 246. 36 

Reduction of surplus: 

Interest on 11,000,000 of 4 per cent road bonds of 1916, plus amortization . . 32, 941. 22 

Interest on 51,225,000 of 4 per cent refunding bonds, plus amortization 47,530. 10 

Interest on $1,000,000 of 4 per cent public Improvement bonds, plus amorti- 
zation 41,164.53 

Interest on loans 23, 918. 60 

Expenses of previous years charged out in current year 128, 312. 33 

^ 273, 866. 78 

Net surplus 259,379.60 

Exhibit No. 4. — Comparative statement of accrued insular revenues for the fiscal years 
ending June SO, 1920, and June SO, 1919. 



Source. 



Year ending June 30 — 



1920 



1919 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



United States internal revenue 

Customs 

Excise taxes 

Property taxes, insular proportion 

Proportion of municipal income for sanitation. 

Registration of documents 

Inheritance taxes 

Taxes on insurance premiums 

Royalties on franchises 

Court fees and fines 

Harbor and dock fees 

Miscellaneous fees »k 

Foreign corporation license fees 

Rent of property. 



Telegraph and telephone receipts 

Interest on loans to municipalities and school 

boards 

Interest on bank deposits 

Canon on mines 

Income tax 

Miscellaneous 



$286,503.53 

300,000.00 

2,864,997.80 

430,274.92 

46,683.45 

114,521.13 

41,9^2.30 

68,283.65 

9,422.63 

49,817.37 

24,001.91 

2,340.00 

3,075.00 

20,014.33 

141,560.45 

73,250.91 

U07,502.49 

792.86 

2,431,276.66 

10,055.34 



$929,571.03 

355,000.00 

2,262,452.78 

819,103.85 

122,479.88 

96,339.50 

42,411.05 

33,896.26 

8,013.04 

40, 778. 22 

22,545.82 

1,517.00 

4,200.00 

17,803.08 

109,591.26 

83,369.10 

85,800.23 

792.86 

802,311.56 

4,952.67 



$602,545.02 



18,181.63 



34,387.39 

1,409.59 

9,039.15 

1,456.09 

823.00 



2,211.25 
31,969.19 



21,702.26 



1,628,965.10 
5,102.67 



7,026,316.73 5,842,929.19 1,183,387.54 



$643,067.50 
55,000.00 



388,828.93 
75,796.43 



-468^5 



1,125.00 



10, 118. 19 



i Does not Include Interest on irrigation fund and university agricultural fund. 



198 



KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June 30, 1920, and June SO, 1919. {Not to be con* 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27.) 



Description. 


Year ending June 30— 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1920 


1919 


LEGISLATIVE. 

Senate and Porto Rico: 

Salaries 


$19,023.83 

6.00 

211.11 

1, 608. 18 

2,282.00 
385.60 


$27,259.91 




$8, 236. 08 


Furniture, books, and library equipment... 
Legislative printing 


i$6.00 




575. 54 
3,840.90 

1,260.00 

425. 20 

1,953.56 


364.43 


Incidentals 




2,232.72 


Compensation to members when in special 
session 


1,022.00 




Mileage for members 


39.60 


TfiTTipnrftry fimplnyftPis . 




1,953.56 










Total, Senate of Porto Rico 


23,504.72 


35,315.11 




11,810.39 








House of representatives: 

Salaries . 


19,759.60 

613.40 

36.24 

1,763.17 


40,843.95 

1,229.30 

271. 04 

3,821.78 

10.00 

1, 975. 63 




21,084.35 


Mileage for members 




615.35 


Legislative printing 




234.80 


Incidentals 




2,058.61 


Furniture, books, and library equipment 




10.00 


Temporary employees 






1, 975. 63 










Total, house of representatives 


22, 172. 41 


48, 151. 70 




25,979.29 








Total legislative 


45, 677. 13 


83,466.81 




37,789.68 








EXECUTIVE. 

Governor: 

Salaries 


17,695.00 

12, 151. 41 

2,576.97 

380.76 

313.40 

708. 17 


15,207.50 

10,960.02 

1,283.91 

767.54 

186. 95 

599.65 


2,487.50 
1,191.39 
1,293.06 




Expenses, fixecnt-ivp. nmnsioTi 




Stationery and printing 




Telegraph and telephone 


386.78 


Postage and freight 


126. 45 
108,52 




Incidentals 








Total, governor 


33,825.71 


29,005.57 


4,820.14 








Executive secretary: 

Salaries 


33,089.70 
625. 42 


32, 188. 82 
505.59 
185.50 
213. 82 
6.82 
698.04 
88.76 

11,641.86 
414. 73 
3,515.94 
24.91 
113. 73 
1,296.55 
248.02 


900.88 
119.83 




Stationery and printing 




Furniture 


185.50 


Postage and freight 


164.34 

11.53 

668.96 




49.48 


Telegraph and telephone 


4.71 




Incidentals 


29.08 


Printing and publication of laws 




88.76 


Bureau of weights and measures: 

Salaries 


15,939.29 

515. 06 

3,735.86 

38.07 

1 367. 86 

1,087.19 

164.01 

12.00 

34,554.19 

7,814.81 

304.33 


4,297.43 

100.33 

221.92 

13.16 




Stationery and printing ; 




Traveling expenses 




Telegraph and telephone 




Equipment of weights and measures 


481. 59 


Postage and freight 




209.36 


Incidentals 




84.01 


Purchase of apparatus for testing gas . . . 


12.00 

8,824.50 
632.86 
304.33 




Bureau of supplies, printing, and transporta- 
tion: « 
Salaries 


25,729.69 
7, 181. 95 




Contingent expenses 




Traveling expenses and delivery 










Total, executive secretary 2 


98,356.90 


84,052.73 


14,304.17 








mstorical Archive of Porto Rico: 

Salaries 


2,712.50 
466.95 




2,712.50 
466.95 




Miscellaneous expenses 












Total, Historical Archive of Porto Rico. . 


3,179.45 




3, 179. 45 










Public service commission: 

Salaries 


10,063.16 

995.64 

3, 174. 75 


7,816.67 

656.05 

4,335.70 


2,246.49 
339.59 




Incidentals 




Miscellaneous expenses 


1,160.95 






Total, public service commission 


14,233.55 


12, 808. 42 


1,425.13 

•• 





1 Credit balance. 

« Bureau of supplies, printing and transportation, "Working capital fund'' not included, as it is self- 
supporting. 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



199 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June 30, 1920, and June 30, 1919. {Not to he con- 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 


Year endmg June 30— 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1920 


1919 


EXECUTIVE— continued . 

Attorney general: 

Salaries - .. .. 


151,213.24 

1,298.86 

193.20 

1, 671. 00 

300.00 

556.68 


$45, 128. 10 
1,807.03 


$6,085.14 




Incidentals 


$508.17 


Purchase of law books 


193.20 




Litigation fund 


4, 103. 13 

400.00 

1,945.35 


2,432.13 


Postage . . 




100.00 


Traveling expenses 




1,388.67 








Total - . . 


55,232.98 


53,383.61 


1,849.37 








Penal institutions: 
Reform school- 
Salaries 


17,494.27 
16,880.15 
4,735.29 
2,019.09 


14,047.56 

12, 271. 64 

4,351.16 

1,428.61 

26.77 

448.73 

188.03 

2,145.94 


3,446.71 

4,608.61 

384.13 

590.48 




Subsistence 




Eciuipment 




Lighting, power, and water ... 




Telegraph and telephone 


26.77 


Transportation and care of animals 

Postage and freight 


' 437.10 

209.74 

3,152.55 




11.63 


21.71 
1,006.61 




Incidentals 








Total 


44,928.19 


34,908.44 


10,019.75 








Penitentiary- 
Salaries 


28,458.36 

27,202.09 

10,412.37 

1,673.15 

731.14 

284.95' 

2,699.02 

948.91 

1,552.49 


22,623.56 

26,370.53 

10,133.34 

2,366.31 

910.78 

462.95 

3,669.51 

953.05 

1,507.67 

73.43 

91.65 


5,834.80 

831.56 

279.03 

H 




Food for prisoners . 




Clothing 




Paving fund . . 


693.16 


Medicines 


179.64 


Fuel 




178.00 


Incidentals 




970.49 


Water 




4.14 


Lighting ... 


44.82 




Telegraph and telephone 


73.43 


Postage and freight 


101.69 


10.04 








Total 


74,064.17 


69,162.78 


4,901.39 








San Juan jail- 
Salaries 


3,285.00 

15,783.01 

711.72 


2,814.83 

16,024.20 

821.94 

19.52 

50.23 

2,698.56 


470.17 




Food for prisoners 


241.19 


Lighting and water 




110.22 


Telegraph and telephone . 




19.52 


Postage and freight 


4.00 
1,131.75 




46.23 


Incidentals 




1,566.81 








Total 


20,915.48 


22,429.28 




1,613.80 








Arecibo jail- 
Salaries 1 


8,146.79 

5,014.94 

549.99 


7,043.66 
15,100.29 

1,242.90 
101.17 
171.62 

7,367.70 


1,103.13 




Food for prisoners 


10,385.35 


Lighting and water 




692. 91 


Telegraph and telephone . 




101.17 


Postage and freight 


40.60 
1,217.43 




131.02 


Incidentals 




6,150.27 








Total 


14,969.75 


31,327.34 




16,367.69 








Ponce jail— 

Salaries : . . 


7,876.33 

8,038.25 

511.91 


6,629.16 

18,888.05 

795.57 

27.59 

117.24 

7,089.17 


1,247.17 




Food for prisoners 


10,849.80 


Lighting and water. 




283.66 


Telegraph and telephone 




27.59 


Postage and freight 


44.25 
417.22 




72.99 


Incidentals 




6,671.95 








Total # 


16,887.96 


33,546.78 




16,668.82 








Mayaguez jail- 
Salaries ... 


7,866.04 

2,779.13 

178.92 


5,984.67 

2,642.38 

201.40 


1,881.37 
136.76 




Food for prisoners 




Lighting and water 


22.48 



200 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June SO, 1920, and June SO, 1919. (Not to he con- 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 


Year ending June 30— 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1920 


1919 


EXEcunvE--contmued. 

Penal insritutions— Continued. 
Mayaguez jail— Continued. 

Telegraph and telephone 




121.98 

171.52 

3,017.16 




121.98 


Postage and freight 


1 75.99 
348.67 
736.00 




95.53 


Incidentals 




2,668.49 


Rent 


$736.00 










Total 


11,984.75 


12,039.11 




54.36 








Humacao jail- 
Salaries 


7,111.01 

5,086.13 

622.82 


5,987.98 

6,280.74 

776.57 

60.77 

47.93 

910.18 


1,123.03 




Food for prisoners 


1,194.61 


Lighting and water 




153.76^ 


TeY^^ph and telephone 




60.77 


Postage and freight 


38.09 
683.81 




9.84 


Incidentals 




226.87 








Total 


13,541.86 


14,064.17 




522.31 








Guayama jail- 
Salaries : 


6,652.12 

4,410.88 

431.22 


4,982.33 

4,804.29 

457.23 

58.45 

33.43 

708.11 


1,669.79 




Food for prisoners 


393.41 


Lighting and water . . 




26.01 


Telegraph and telephone 




58.45^ 


Postage and freight 


36.04 
504.75 


2.61 




Incidentals 


203.36- 








Total 


12,035.01 


11,043.84 


991.17 








Aguadilla jail- 
Salaries 


5,934.17 

3,063.06 

598.66 

118.39 


4,540.26 

2,638.08 

437.00 

62.87 

10.08 

42.76 

688.64 


1,393.91 
424.98 
161.66 
55.52 




Food for prisoners 




Rent....:. 




Lighting and water 




Telegraph and telephone 


10. oa 


Postage and freijjiit 


35.94 
336.73 




6.82 


Incidentals 




351.91 








Total ... 


10,086.95 


S.41Q fiQ 


1,667.26 










Miscellaneous- 
Transportation of prisoners 


902.97 
8,263.48 


1,435.03 

8,883.34 

130.00 




532.06^ 


Maintenance of prisoners in municipal 
jails 




619.86- 


Reimbursement to Ramon Labiosa for 
house rent 














Total 


9,166.45 


10,448.37 




1,281.92^ 








Total, penal institutions 


228,580.57 


247,389.80 




18,809.25 








Total, attomev general 


283,813.55 


300,773.41 




16,959.86- 








Treasurer: 

Salaries 


247,053.97 
9,168.34 
95.55 
1,243.72 
3,024.91 
4,113.38 

8,360.01 

228.26 

2,614.76 

14,489.15 
5,621.70 
3,244.50 

1,521. CI 


1212,282.04 
6,978.05 
98.78 
1,353.38 
7,858.32 
5,814.96 

7,957.93 


34,771.93 
2,190.29 




Stationery and printing 




Lighting and water 


3.2$ 


Telegraph and telephone 




109.66 


Incidentals 




4,833.41 


Postage and freight 




1,701.58 


New engraving plates and printinginternal- 
revenue stamps 


402.08 

228.26 

1,667.58 

1,232.57 




Cigar guaranty stamps 




Traveling expenses 


947. 18 

13,256.58 
5,838.30 
2,237.00 

4,933.85 
1,184.17 




Traveling expenses, internal-revenue agents 
and assessors 




Care of horses, internal-revenue agents 


216.60 


Care of horses, assessors' 


1,007.50 




Levying additional taxes on income ofl tii» 
fiscal year 1917-18 


3,411.94 


Inspiection of Porto Rican tobacco 




1.184.17 



1 This amount includes 185,436.53 for "Salaries, collectors of internal revenues" and 1989. 42 for "Compen- 
«ation to.stamp agents." 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



201 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June SO, 1920 y and June SO, 1919. (Not to be coH' 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 


Year ending June 30— 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1920 


1919 


EXECUTIVE— continued. 

Treasurer— Ck)ntinued. 

Premiums on bonds of employees of the in- 
sular government 


14,941.20 

3,907.04 

162.50 

1,903.70 

13,893.74 
360.96 


$4,958.39 




$17.19 


Preparation of property-tax receipts 


13,907.04 

162.50 

1,903.70 

13,893.74 
360.96 




Unexpendable property 






Rent of collectors' offices ^. . 






Levying of income taxes provided by act 
«|No. 80, laws of 1919 






Expenses, sale of bonds for roads 






Reimbursements to municipalities for influ- 
enza expenditures 


22, 187. 03 


22,187.03 








Total treasurer 


325,724.30 


297,885.96 


27,838.34 








Auditor: 

Salaries 


81,095.71 

1,637.68 

151.90 

4,757.98 

453. 08 

719.98 


75,724.39 

1,484.36 

52.12 

4,533.56 

461.41 

996.38 


5,371.12 
153.32 
99.78 
224.42 




Stationery and printing 




Telegraph and telephone 




Traveling expenses 




Postage and freight 


8.33 


Incidentals 




276. 40 








Total auditor 


88,816.33 


83,252.42 


5,563.91 








Department of the Interior: 
Office of the commissioner- 
Salaries ' .. 


130,975.55 
1,694.69 
1,491.87 
2,298.68 

3. 542. 04 
1,772.03 

219. 27 
2,566.15 

986.92 

3. 168. 05 


92,692.02 
10,786.01 
1,585.84 
2,048.86 
2,778.98 
1,720.93 
179.23 
2,473.92 


38,283.53 




Incidentals 


9,091.32 
93.97 


Traveling expenses 




Postage and freight 


249. 82 
763.06 
51.10 
40.04 
92.23 

986.92 
3, 168. 05 




Stationery and printing 




Automobile expenses 




Telegraph and telephone 




Purchase of automobile plates 




Division of public lands- 
Traveling expenses 




Field work 












Total 


148,715.25 


114,265.79 


24,449.46 








Maintenance and repair of public roads and 
bridges- 
Construction, maintenance, and repair 
of public road s and bridges 


735,310.26 
299.93 


615,397.89 


119,912.37 
299.93 




Maintenance of roads, experimental sta- 
tion 










Total 


735,610.19 


615,397.89 


120,212.30 








Maintenance, repairs, and reconstmction of 
public buildings- 
Maintenance, repairs^ and reconstruc- 
tion of public buildings 


48,522.95 
1,002.71 
2,923.24 


60,010.16 
1,030.94 
2,893.23 

26,415.00 

4,461.57 
7,283.53 




11,487.21 


Water for public buildings 




28.23 


Electric light for public buildings 


30.01 




Construction of two dormitories, Boys' 
and Girls' Charity School 


, 26,415.00 

4,461.57 
7,283.53 


Maintenance, repair, construction of 
buildings and improvements of public 
lands, College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanical Arts, Mavaguez 






Alteration, repair, and construction of 
reform school building 






Reconstruction and repair of buildings, 
reform school 


3,214.91 

241,60 

2,998.16 


3,214.91 

241.60 

2,998.16 




Repairs to high school, Stop 4, Puerta 
de Tierra 






Repairs to building for anemia hospital 
at Utuado 







» Credit balance. 

2 This amount includes $749.25 for "compensation to pilots acting as captains of ports." 



202 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June SO, 1920, and June 30, 1919. (Not to be con- 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 



EXECUTIVE— continued. 

Department of the Interior— Continued. 
Maintenance, rep^rs, etc.— Continued. 
Construction and repair of buildings, 

quarantine hospital 

Improvements to buildinR, insane asy- 
lum 



Total. 



Maintenance and repair of harbor improve- 
ments- 
Repairing bulkhead and sea wall in San 

Juan Harbor 

Maintenance and reconstruction of har- 
bor structures 



Year ending June 30— 



Total. 



Miscellaneous — 

Plans for construction of public service 

railroads 

Survey, sa'.e, or lease of certain Govern- 
ment lands at Boqueron, Cabo Rojo. . 
Survey and sale of certain Government 

lands , 

Promote the cultivation of new crops 

and for forest reserves 

Line of communication between Fajardo 
and Vieques, and Vieques and Cule- 

bra 

Construction of an iron fence in front of 

the Girls' Charity School Building 

Construction of tank for eradication of 
ticks, experimental station and field 

force 

Irrigation system ai Isabela and Agua- 

dilla 

Equipmeni of the Historical Archive of 

Porto Rico 

Installation of water-supply system, 

insular sanatorium 

Forestry plantings and nursery division 

of forestry 

Aiding the victims of Arecibo fire 

Earthquake relief fund- 
Repair and partial reconstruction of 
tnebullding, Arecibodistrictcourt 
Repairsto Ponce district court build- 
ing 

Repairs to the building of the blind 

asylum at Ponce 

Repairs to the building for the office 

of the captain of the port in Ponce . 

Repairs to the building for the Girls' 

Charity School in Santurce. ..:... 

Repairs to the building for the Boys' 

Cnarity School in Santurce 

Aiding poor persons who by reason 
of the earthquake shall have lost 
either partially or totally their 

homes 

School board of A nasco for repairs of 
the Ramirez de A rellano and De 
Hostos school buildings, at S2,000 

each 

School board of Lares, for the repair 

of the Clay school building 

Repairs to the reform school build- 
ing 

Reapir of Caminero houses, at not to 

exceed S300 each 

Repairing bridges and culverts 



$4,399.59 
1,050.47 



64,353.63 



4,856.91 



4, 856. 91 



1919 



$102,094.43 



11.23 

484.28 
123.86 

2,994.46 
196.15 

4, 108. 98 

1,284.57 

373. 93 

5,607.97 

1,638.87 
119. 25 



7,885.44 


1,294.37 


22,243.58 


950.08 


8,429.62 


687. 76 


1,038.30 


743.42 


8,048.93 


3,708.57 


4,979.71 


4,494.06 



91,994.00 

3,273.14 

2,301.01 

3,422.00 

4,948.73 
21,55L53 



Increase. 



$4,399.59 
1,050.47 



712. 73 



712. 73 



761. 41 

78.47 

287. 96 

2,086.10 



4,856.91 



4,144.18 



Decrease. 



196. 32 



440. 89 

265. 48 

25.09 

1,187.11 

773. 21 
416. 11 



2,994.46 
196. 15 

4,108.98 

1,284.57 

372.93 

5,607.97 

1,638.87 
119.25 

6,591.07 
21,293.50 
7,741.86 

294. 88 
4,340.36 

485.65 

91,553.11 

3,007.66 

2,275.92 

2,234.89 

4,175.52 
21,135.42 



$37,740.60 



712. 73 



761.41 
67.24 



1,962.24 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



203 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the yeass ending June 30, 1920, and June 30, 1919. (Not to be con- 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 


Year ending June 30— 


Increase. 


Decrease 


1920 


1919 




EXECUTIVE— continued. 

Department of the Interior— Continued. 
Miscellaneous— Continued. 

Earthquake relief fund— Continued. 
Aidlne; the municipality of Aguado 
in the reconstruction and repair of 


$4, 819 95 

274.79 

2, 180. 32 

2,831.73 

2,516.92 

3,572.44 

325. 11 
2,307.39 
8,418.14 
1,500.00 
12,916.25 
3,605.45 

16,950.00 


10.13 
497. 12 
21.28 

41.34 

22.90 

.25.00 


$4, 819. 82 




chool board of Aguadilla for repan- 
of Lafaj^ette school building 

School board of Moca for the repair 
of M. Quinones school building.. . 

School board of San German, for the 
repair and reconstruction of An- 
tnnia Martinez school building. . . 


S222. 33 


2,159.04 
2,790.39 
2,494.02 
3,547.44 

325. 11 
2,307.39 
8,418.14 
1,500.00 
12,916.25 
3,605.45 

16,950.00 






School board of San Sebastian, for 
the repair and reconstruction of 
Whittier School Building 




School board of Sabana Grande, for 
the repair and reconstruction of 




Repairs and reconstruction of the 
building for the College of Agri- 
culture and Mechanical Arts, 




Aiding the municipality of Agua- 
dilla in the reconstruction and re- 
pair of municipal buildings 

Aiding the municipality of Maya- 
guez in the reconstruction and re- 
pair of municipal bmldings 

Belief of Josefa Alvarez, widow of 
Irizarry, for the death of her 
daughter, Emilia Irizarry . . . ... . . 

School board of Aguadilla, for the 
construction of a 6-room school 


















School board of San German, for tlie 
construction of a 6-room school 
building 






Mortgage loans to persons whose 
houses by virtue of the recent 
earthquake have suffered dam- 
ages of such import as to make 
them uninhabitable and whose 
owners have absolutely no means 
for the repair and reconstruction 












Total 


259,277.03 


18, 807. 86 


240,469.17 





Total, department of the interior 


1,212,813.01 


851,278.70 


361,534.31 







Bureau of insular telegraph: 
Salaries i 


104,876.31 


76,956.39 
21,235.15 

901.52 

71.12 
.62 


27,919.92 




Incidentals . ........•••.-•. 


21, 235. 15 


Repayment to Porto Rico Telephone Co. of 
25 per cent on telegraph busmess 

Rent for new quarters where free quarters 
werfi dflstroved -- 


947.49 


45.97 




71.12 


nonstrnotion of frame buildinET. AfiTuadilla. . 






.52 


Lines between San Juan, Cayey, and En- 
senda in connection with wireless service. . 
Extension of telegraph and telephone lines.. 
RfiTit rf officfts 


2,468.19 

919.75 

4, 190. 80 

1,443.91 

2.898.48 

2,955.59 

3,057.67 

579.84 

340.04 

428.30 


2,468.19 

919.75 

4, 190. 80 

1,443.91 

2,898.48 

2,955.59 

3,057.67 

579.84 

340.04 

428. 30 












Iviclitin? ' 






Stfttionprv and nrintinff 






Purcl.a eof material 

Trflvpliiiff pxnensps 
















Tplpnliorfi rPiitals and t' 11*n 


















Total, bureau of insular telegraph 


125,100.37 


99, 164. 70 


25, 941. 67 







» This amount inclides $2,934.?>3 f )r additional employees to relieve the sick or absent, and J2,096.44 for 
extra compensation f jr extrajrdinary work. 



204 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June SO, 1920, and June SOy 1919. (Not to belcon- 
fu^ed with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 



EXECXJTIVK— continued. 

Department of Education: 

Office of the commissioner- 
Salaries 

Incidentals and traveling expenses. 

Postage 

Printing 

Office supplies 

Telegrapn and telephone 

Traveling expenses 

Transportation 

Incidentals 

Furniture 



Total.. 



Public schools — 

Salaries, common schools 

Contingent expenses, common schools., 

Textbooks and school supplies 

Common-school equipment 

Salaries, high schools 

Contingent expenses, high schools 

Summer school and institutes 

Night schools - 

Rent, equipmentjand supplies for rural 
schools ■ 

Aiding school boards in the mainte- 
nance of school lunch rooms 



Total., 



Miscellaneous — 

Magazine publishing fund. 

Total 



Year ending June 30— 



1920 



$46,494.24 



1919 



Increase. 



1,500.00 

2,469.81 

1,197.07 

1,196.70 

2, 714. 80 

999.90 

373.93 

129.45 



57,075.90 



1,964,503.38 

7,883.28 

41,618.40 

1 15, 061. 99 

122,791.09 

3, 763. 10 

1,730.50 

4,638.75 



8,708.18 



2, 140, 574. e 



$41, 602. 79 
9,628.65 
1, 292. 13 



52, 523. 57 



1,377,408.93 

6,483.22 

30,664.59 

1 13, 389. 63 

91, 117. 76 

4,752.01 

1,946.30 

4,618.00 

1,976.27 



1,505,577.45 



$4,891.45 



207.87 

2,469.81 

1,197.07 

1,196.70 

2,714.80 

999.90 

373.93 

129.45 



4,552.33 



587,094.45 
1,400.06 
10,953.81 
11,672.36 
31,673.33 



20.75 



8, 708. 18 



Total, department of education.. 



University of Porto Rico: 

Expenses, University of Porto Rico 

Purchase and maintenance of supplies in 
the laboratories. College of Agriculture and 
Mechanical Arts, Mayaguez 

University fund, indefinite 

Total, University of Porto Rico 

Carnegie Library: 



Incidentals 

Total, Carnegie Library. 



Government of the island of Culebra: 

Salaries 

Rent 

Public lighting 

Street cleaning 

Office supplies and medicines 

Stationery and printing 

Postage and freight 

Medicmes for poor 

Incidentals 

Repair and maintenance of roads 

Total, goverment of island of Culebra. 

Department of agriculture and labor: 
Office of the commissioner- 
Salaries 

Traveling expenses 

Lighting and water 

Stationery and printing 

Postage and freight 

Telegraph and telephone 

Incidentals , 



Total.. 



2,197,650.59 



64,996.79 



6, in. 98 

1,825.88 



72,934.65 



7,257.17 
4,724.92 



11,982.09 



4,793.17 

60.00 

420.00 

300.00 



7.77 
16.61 
84.61 
12.47 
238.50 



5,933.13 



18,128.86 
242.83 
55.45 
163.80 
72.15 
59.95 
1317.35 



115. 17 



634,997.24 



115. 17 



1,558,216.19 



49,762.83 



49,762.83 



5,786.66 
3,320.82 



9,107.48 



4,002.00 

60.00 

420.00 

300.00 

67.81 



4,849.81 



18,405.69 



15,023.34 
171.85 
58.20 
297.86 
87.97 
45.14 
135.00 



15,849.36 



639,434.40 



15,233.96 



6,111.98 
1,825.88 



1,470.51 
1,404.10 



2,874.61 



791. 17 



7.77 
16.61 
84.61 
12.47 
238.50 



1,083.32 



3,105.52 
70.98 



14.81 



2,556.33 



1 Credit balance. 



Decrease. 



$9,628.65 



988.91 
215.80 



1,976.27 



115. 17 



115. 17 



67.81 



2.75 
134.06 
15.82 



482.35 



CONSOLIDATED ri]SrANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



205 



Exhibit No. b.— Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June SO, 1920, and June 30, 1919. (Not to be con- 
futed with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 



EXECUTIVE— continued. 

Department of agriculture and labor- 
Bureau of agriculture- 
Salaries 

Traveling expenses. 
Printing and stationery 
Telegraph and telephone 
Exhibition supplies 

Incidentals 

Lighting and water 
Postage and freight. 



Total.. 



Division of forestry- 
Salaries 

Traveling expenses 

Equipment 

Maintenance of motor vehicle 
Stationery and printing 
Telegraph and telephone 
Incidentals 



Total 

Bureau of labor- 
Salaries 

Stationery and printing 
Telegraph and telephone 
Traveling expenses. 
Postage and freight. 
Incidentals 



Total.. 



Experimental station and field force- 
Salaries 

Farm labor 

Traveling expenses 
Printing and stationery 

Incidentals 

Supplies 

Postage and freight. 
Telegraph and telephone 

Lighting and water 

• Maintenance of buildings. 

Farming expenses 

Equipment and accessories. 

Eradication of ticks 

Care of cattle - - — 

Purchase of specimens of caprine, ovine, 
and porcine cattle. 



Total.. 



Miscellaneous- 
Insular forest fund . _ 
Industrial and agricultural exhibitions 
in the city of Ponce 



Insular police: 

Salaries ..-• 

Stationery and prmtmg 

Lighting and water 

Telegraph and telephone 

Rent of^quarters 

Transportation ..- 

Automobile supplies and repairs 
Unexpendable property 




Total ■ 

Total department of agriculture 
and labor 161,059.50 



I Credit balance. 



14748—20 14 



206 



REPORT OF THlii GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June SO, 1920 j and June SO, 1919, (Not to be con- 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No, ;?7)— Continued. 



Description. 


Year ending June 30— 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1920 


1919 


EXECUTIVE— conttQued. 

Insular police— Continued. 

Car© of aniTTifils, ,., , 


$6,111.52 
1,077.90 
1,549.90 
3,519.34 

11,564.94 
226.26 

2,000.00 

1,830.64 


16,262.46 

1,416.91 

, 1,500.00. 

4,192.11 

7,041.44 

359.26 

2,000.00 




$160. 94 


Postage and freight 




339.01 


Secret and confidential services 


$49.90 




Incidentals . 


672. 77 


Pay for reenlistments 


4,523.50 




Bicycle repairs and supplies 


133. 00 


Compensation for the lives of members of 
the insular police 






Traveling expenses of guardsmen and their 
families in cases of transfers 


1,830.64 










Total insular police 


614,183.73 


488,676.15 


125,607.58 






Department of health: 

OflBce of the commissioner- 
Salaries 


81,770.57 
4,197.74 
31.45 
444.18 
1,399.92 
4,823.90 

1,466.64 

927.59 

1,063.48 

675.53 

4,740.96 

1,409.08 

4,140.09 

3,124.66 

7.00 

557. 77 

1,. 555. 95 


75,210.26 


6,560.31 
4,197.74 




Automobile supplies and repairs 

Chemicals and disinfectants 




60.91 

572.57 

2,789.62 

355. 75 

3,644.16 

1,331.04 

2,194.62 

849.14 

15,588.68 

1,436.67 

3,456.80 

7,113.28 

7.50 


29.46 


Lierhtine and v^ater 





128. 39 


Postage and freight 




1,389.70 


Purchase of vaccine, virus, and serums. . 


4,468.15 


Stationery, printing, and publication 
of Medical Bulletin 


2,177.52 


Supplies and equipment, bacteriologi- 
cal laboratory 




403. 45 


Supplies and equipment, chemical labo- 
ratory 




1,131.14 
173.61 


Telegraph and telephone 




Traveling expenses 




10, &47. 72 
27.59 


Incidentals 




Labor 


683.29 




Rent 


3,988.62 
.60 


KilUne and burvine animals 




Unexpendable property 


557. 77 
1.555.95 




Care an4 maintenance of animals 












Total 


112,336.51 


114,611.00 




2,274.49 








Leper colony- 
Salaries 


5,559.99 
7,906.33 
2,508.87 
2,349.46 
455. 87 


5,101.33 
6,016.53 
1,099.11 
2,671.65 
4.00 


458.66 
1,889.80 
1,409.76 




Subsistence 




C'othing and bedding 




Incidentals .. .. 


322. 19 


Unexpendable property 


451. 87 


« 






Total 


ie,:80.62 


14,892.62 


3,887.90 








Quarantine hospital: 

Salaries 


3,443.30 

1,996.57 

400.77 

383.25 


1,806.35 
620.48 
280.58 
322. 02 

4,785.43 


1,636.95 

1,376.09 

120. 19 

61.23 






Subsistence 




Liehtine and water 




Incidentals T 




Building construction and repairs 


4,785.43 






Total 


6,223.89 


7,814.86 




1,590.97 








Field force, salaries 


34,192.02 
15,036.64 

17,167.73 

11,080.80 

7,237.65 

614. 14 

797. 43 

836.40 

1,194.92. 

161. 18 

173. 48 

L66 


84,162.39 
15,560.03 

21,261.91 

9,954.67 
6,070.70 
285.67 
324.51 
587.50 
1,370.47 
144.73 
253.35 




49,970.37 
623. 39 


Suppression of anemia 




Mosquito extermination and control and 
suDDression of malaria 




4,094.18 


Blindasylum— 

Salaries 


1,126.13 

1,166.95 

328.47 

472.92 

248.90 


Subsistence 




Clothing and bedding 




Medicines and sunnlies 




Fuel 




Incidentals 


176.55 


Water and liehtine: 


16.45 




Transnortation of natients 


79.87 


Unexoendable property 


L66 










Total 


22,097.66 


18,99L60 


3,106.06 









CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS: 



207 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses pay able from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June 30, 1920, and June SO, 1919. (Not to he con- 
fused with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 21) — Continued. 





Year ending June 30— 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Description. 


1920 


1919 


EXECUTIVE— continued. 

Department of health- Continued. 
Insane asylum- 
Salaries . 


$34,918.27 

50,883.96 

2,272.72 

2,685.19 

2,153.01 

1,362.45 

389. 04 

11,218.38 

119.76 


$27,061.08 
32,049.47 
1,610.81 
2,263.95 
1,685.61 
2,123.47 
^ 670.38 
1^,070.73 


$7,857.19 

18,834.49 

661.91 

421.24 

467.40 




Subsistence 




Fuel 




Incidentals .. ....... 




Water and lighting 




Medicines and supplies 


$761.02 


Transportation of patients 




281. 34 


Clothmg and bedding 




11,852.35 


Unexpended property 


119.76 










Total 


93,426.50 


64,394.04 


29,032.46 








Girls' Charity School- 
Salaries 


21,307.63 

27,259.33 

7,806.89 

113. 03 


16,420.50 
13,449.01 
10,767.97 


4,887.13 
13,810.32 




Subsistence 




Contingent expneses 


2,96L08 


Purchase of typewriters and supplies... 


113. 03 








Total 


56,486.88 


40,637.48 


15,849.40 








Boys' Charity School- 
Salaries 


34,310.65 
33,616.76 
15, 607. 58 


26,907.53 
20,472.08 
14, 171. 77 


7,403.12 
13, 144. 68 
1,435.81 




Subsistence . 




Contingent expenses 








Total 


83,534.99 


61,55L38 


21,983.61 








Miscellaneous- 
Emergency fund for control and sup- 
pression of epidemics 


5, 182. 09 

907.50 

29,263.72 

1,200.00 
10,975.11 


30,280.05 

827. 13 

39,999.20 

1,200.00 

257, 178. 20 




25,097.96 


Rat extermination . 


80. 37 




Care of tuberculosis patients 


10,735.48 


Education of deaf and dumb children . . 




Suppression of influenza 




246,203.09 






Total. 


47,528.42 


329,484.58 




281,956.16 




.. - 


Total, department of health 


500,811.76 


773,361.89 




266 550 13 








Civil-service commission: 

Salaries 


6,805,96 
49.14 

769. 79 
19.75 
103. 32 


. 5,74L17 

47.82 

550.51 
13.50 
106.48 


1,064.79 
L32 

219. 28 
6.25 




Incidentals 




Stationery, printing, and additional per- 
sonnel 




Telegraph and telephone 




Postage and freight 


3.16 








Total, civil-service commission 


7,747.96 


6,459.48 


1,288.48 








Institute of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene of 
Porto Rico: 
Salaries 


19,205.01 
192. 17 
422. 40 

74.94 

12.25 
176. 86 

64.39 
272.54 

75.25 
479. 20 
1 162. 25 
146. 48 
262.53 
113.00 
766.40 


9,898.33 
110.17 
417. 25 
79.07 


9,306.68 
82.00 
5.15 




Stationery and printing 




Lighting, gas, and water 




Tleegraph and telephone 


4.13 


Traveling expenses 


12.25 
19.99 




Care of experimental animals 


156.87 
147. 29 
159. 12 

29.50 
869.39 

18.34 
141. 00 
166.05 

17.18 
1, 151. 83 




Postage and freight 


82.90 


Incidentals 


113. 42 

45.75 




Purchase of experimental animals 




Instruments, reagents, apparatus 


390.19 


Unexpendable property 




180.59 


Library 


5.48 
96.48 
95. 82 




Culture, media, and ice 




Medicines 




Miscellaneous expenses 


385.43 








Total, Institute of Tropical Medicine and 
Hygiene of Porto Rico 


22, 101. 17 


13,36L39 


8,739.78 









1 Credit balance. 



208 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 5. — Comparative statement of accrued expenses pay able from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June 30, 1920^ and June SO, 1919. {Not to be con- 
futed with cash disbursements on Exhibit No. 27) — Continued. 



Description. 



Year ending June 30— 



1920 



1919 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



EXECUTIVE— continued . 

General miscellaneous: 

Miscellaneous expenditures subject to the 

approval of the governor 

Salary of historian 

Exi)enses of elections in Porto Rico , 

National Guard of Porto Rico fund 

National Guard of Porto Rico, miscellaneous 

exi)enses 

Board of medical examiners \ 

Board of dental examiners 

Board of pharmaceutical examiners 

Insular board of elections- 
Salaries , 

Ck)ntingent expenses, 1919-20 and 1920- 

21 

Medical, dental, and pharmaceutical boards, 

tyi)ewriter for boards of examiners 

Relief of victims, Yagtiez Theater fire in 

Mayaguez 

Reimbursing Pedro Alfonso Rosso, amount 
paid for nonexisting property sold for 

collection of taxes 

Reimbursing Jose Ramon de Arce, amount 
paid for nonexisting property sold for 

collection o f taxes 

Board of the commissioners for the promo- 
tion of uniformity of legislation in the 

States and Territories of the Union 

Board of veterinary examiners 

Repayment of fees, fines, and moneys im- 
Koperly collected by secretaries and 

marshals of insular courts 

Workman's relief commission, salaries 

Translation bureau — 

Salaries and expenses 

Temporary employees 

Incidentals 

Board of commissioners for the promo* 
tion of legislation in the States and 

Territories of the Union 

Entertainment fund for Members of 
Congress of the United States guests 

of the Legislature of Porto Rico. 

Repayment of loans made to the insular 
government during emergency due to 
earthquake of October, 191*— 

Banco Gomercial 

Royal Bank of Canada 

American Colonial Bank 

Banco Territorial y Agricola 

Expenses of the banquet tendered the 
French Navy by the legislature 



Total, general miscellaneous . 
Total, executive 



JUDiaAL. 

Insular courts: 

Supreme court- 
Salaries 

Incidentals 

Purchase of law books . . 

Water 

Lighting , 

Miscellaneous expenses. . 



Total. 



19,418.87 
1,650.00 



468.45 

9,425.02 
956.07 
422.91 
704.59 

3,000.00 

25,746.41 

1,081.67 

3,800.00 

32.29 

24.69 



617.97 
19.92 



22.09 
466.67 

11,209.99 
523.80 
310.56 



69,901.97 



5,846,175.72 



59,071.67 
11.20 
10.00 
40.45 
80.72 
836.95 



60,038.59 



$12,484.40 

1,500.00 

364.08 

3,519.53 



789. 71 

273.44 

1,341.58 



10,430.00 

3,56L90 

426.99 



123.60 



24,747.20 



19,286.65 
11,998.04 
8,838.45 
4,999.63 

900.00 



$150. 00 



9,425.02 
166.36 
149.47 



3,000.00 

25,746.41 

1,08L67 

3,800.00 

32.29 

24.69 



617.97 
19.92 



22.09 
466.67 



779.99 



105,585.20 



4,854,824.34 



61,195.80 

1,001.10 

2.50 

31.45 

73.74 



52,304.59 



991,351.38 



7,876.87 



7.50 
9.00 



836.95 



7,734.00 



13,065.53 



364.08 
3,051.08 



636.99 



2,038. 10 
116.43 



123.60 
24,747.20 



19,286.65 
11,998.04 
8,838.45 
4,999.63 

900.00 



35,683.23 



1,002.30 



1 Credit balance. 



CONSOLIDATED TINANOIAL EXHIBITS. 



209 



Exhibit No. b.— Comparative statement of accrued expenses payable from insular revenue 
appropriations for the years ending June 30, 1920, and June SO, 1919. {Not to be con- 
fussed with cash disbursements on Exhibit No, 27) — Continued. 



Description. 


Year ending June 30— 


Increase. 




1920 


1919 




JUDICIAL— continued. 

Insular courts— Continued. 

Publications of the decisions of the supreme 
court- 
Salaries 




16,118.33 
105.58 
498.09 

12.00 

8.18 




16, 118. 3? 


Incidentals 






105.58 


Advance sheets 






498.09 


Publication of the decisions of the 
snpreiTie court r - , 






12.00 


Digest of the '^Decisions de Puerto 
Rico" 






8.18 


Publication of the advance sheets of the 
decisions of the supreme court 


11862.58 




862.58 








Total -i 


1862.58 


6,742. 18 




7,604.76 




, 




District courts- 
Salaries 


132,174.65 

666.94 

5,235.56 

157. 50 

338.62 

3,894.00 

3,072.41 

1,437.72 

160.33 

773.00 

16,904.77 

1,341.98 

17,657.59 

28.80 

62.50 

3,603.50 


124,396.72 

.724.69 

4,694.63 

104.79 

277.18 

2,821.38 

1,705.84 

1,372.84 

31.10 

669.00 

7,466.44 

1,221.00 

10,362.68 

20.40 


17,777.93 




Postage 


57. 65 


Incidentals . . - 


641.03 

52.71 

61.44 

1,072.62 

1,366.67 

64.88 

129.23 

114.00 

9,439.33 

120.98 

7,294.91 

8.40 

62.50 

3,603.50 




Water 




Lighting 




Rent 




Traveling expenses, judges and fiscals. . 
Care of horses 






Traveling expenses, marshals 




Autopsies and exhumations 




Fees of jurors 




Fees of witnesses in cases of lunacy 




Fees of witnesses 




Fees of defense witnesses in criminal 
cases 




Purchase of law books 




Fees of iurors srand iurv ^ 












Total 


187,499.87 


156,867.49 


31,642.38 








Municipal courts- 
Salaries 


103,242.49 
3,993.02 
8,228.00 
3,672.02 
3,337.60 
1,632.65 
3,100.05 


99,877.67 
3,608.74 
7,263.03 
3,568.97 
3,345.60 
1,622.32 
1,679.82 


3,364.92 
484.28 
964.97 
113.05 




Incidentals 




Rent 




Traveling expenses, court officials 

Care of horses 




8.00 


Traveling expenses, marshals 




89.67 


Fees of witnesses 


1,420.23 








Total 


127,105.83 


120,856.05 


6,249.78 








Total, insular courts 


173,781.71 


335,760.31 


38,021.40 








Registrars of property- 
Salaries 


57,605.41 

2,178.52 

3,276.00 

714.00 


51,666.01 

2,329.46 

3,161.03 

600.00 


6,039.40 




Incidentals ... 


150.^ 


Rent 


114.97 
114.00 




Clerk at large for registries of property. . 






Total , registrars of property 


63,773.93 
437,555.64 


67,666.50 
393,416.81 


6,117.43 
44,138.83 








Total, judicial 









RECAPITULATION. 



Legislative. , 
Executive . . 
Judicial 



Total. 



145,677. 13 

5,846,176.72 

437,665.64 



183,466.81 

4,854,824.34 

393,416.81 



6,329,408.49 5,331,707.96 997,700.53 



1991,351.38 
44,138.83 



$37,789.68! 



I Credit balance. 



210 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 6. — Loans to municipalities as of June SO, 1920} 



Munioipality. 



Balance 
July 1,1919 



Loans 
made dur- 
ing year. 



Amount 
repaid dur- 
ing year. 



Converted 
into bond 
issues pend- 
ing execu 
tion.« 



Total amount of loans 
June 30, 1920. 



Loans not 
converti- 
ble into 
bond 
issues. 



Aguadilla 

AguasBuenas. 

Aibonito 

Corozal 

Fajardo 

Guayama 

Ouayanilla 

Ourabo 

Isabela 

Marioao 

Maunabo 

Mayaguez 

Naranjito 

PatiUas 

Fenuelas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas... 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo... 

ToaAlta 

Utuado 



$6,250.00 
1,678.20 
2,400.00 
4,200.00 
9,000.00 
4,000.00 
500.00 
1,130.00 
2,500.00 
7,000.00 

11,000.00 

8,703.84 

700.00 

2,405.75 

500.00 

52,500.00 

680.00 

3,000.00 

' 700.00 
1,050.00 

15,951.85 



1760.00 
300.00 



300.00 
1,500.00 
2,000.00 
500.00 
505.00 
500.00 



$5,500.00 
1,378.20 
2,400.00 
3,900.00 
7,500.00 
2,000.00 



$7,000.00 
11,000.00 



565.00 
2,000.00 



$1,510.11 



200.00 
500.00 
100.00 
52,500.00 
170.00 
1,500.00 



8,703.84 
500.00 

3,415.86 
400.00 



150.00 



15,951.85 



510.00 

1,500.00 

700.00 

900.00 



Total , 

Total amount of both classes , 

Less reserve for municipal loan account. . 



135,849.64 



1,510.11 



61,535.00 



33,95L84 



41,872.90 



75,824. 
1,000. 



74,824.75 



» Tbese loans are repayable to the indefinite no-flscal year appropriation "Relief of municipalities" as 
shown in Exhibit No. 32. 
> For details and explanations of these bond issues, see Exhibit No. 9. 

Exhibit No. 7. — Loans to school boards as of June 30, 1920 ^ 





Balance 
July 1, 1919. 


Loans 
made dur- 
ing year. 


Amount 
repaid dur- 
ing year. 


Total amount of loans 
June 30, 1920. 


School board. 


Converted 
into bond 
issues pend- 
ing execu- 
tion. 


Loans nc ' 

convertea 

into bond 

issues 


Naranjito 


$799 99 




$133. ii^\ 




$6(>6 66 











* Tnis loan Is repayable to the indefinite no-fiscal year appropriation '* Reliei oi school boards." 

Exhibit No. 8. — Loans from school building fund — amounts due from school boo ^as for 
construction of school buildings under acts of the legislative assembly, approved Mar. 
14, 1907. and Mar. 9, 1908. 



ohool board. 



Due Gov- 
ernment 
Julyl, 
1910. 



Total cost 
of improve- 
ments dur- 
ing year. 



Proportion 
assumed 
by insular 
govern- 
ment and 
charged to 
construc- 
tion of 
school 
buildings. 



Remainder 

chargeable 

to school 

boards. 



Repaid on 
loans dur- 
ing year. 



Balance 
due Gov- 
ernment 
June 30, 
1920. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla... 
Aibonito.... 

Ciales 

Comerio 

Corozal 

Ourabo 

Luquillo.... 

Rincon 

San Lorenzo. 
TrujlUoAlto 
VegaAlta... 

Total.. 



$660.00 
3,600.00 
2,799.99 

785.98 
2,093.42 

400.00 
9,319.83 
2,503.66 
2,357.03 
1,800.00 

550.00 

900.00 



$4,866.37 
55.98 



$2,433.18 
27.99 



$2,433.19 
27.99 



$330.00 
900.00 
600.00 
450.00 
600.00 
400.00 

1,150.00 
600.00 
400.00 
450.00 
225.00 
460.00 



$330.00 
2,700.00 
2,199.99 
336.98 
1,693,42 

02 

10,603... 

2,031.65 

1,957.03 

1,350.00 

326.00 

450.00 



27,769.91 



4,922.35 



2,461.17 



2,46L18 



6,365.00 



23,876,09 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



211 






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212 



KEFOBT OF THE QOTEBNOB OF FOBIO BICO. 



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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



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218 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 11. — Statement showing the location by municipalities and valuation of 
real estate owned by the insular government as of June SO, 1920. 



Municipalities. 



Adiuntas 

Aguadilla 

A^as Buenas.. 

Aibonito 

Anasco 

Arecibo 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta 

Barranquitas... 

Barros 

Bayamon 

Cabo Rojo 

Caguas 

Camuy 

Carolina 

Cayey 

Ceiba 

Ciales 

Cidra., 



Coamo 

Culebra 

Dorado 

Fajardo 

Guanica 

Guayama... 
Guayanilla. . 

HatiUo 

Humacao... 

Isabela 

JuanaDiaz.. 
Lajas 



Lares ... 

Las Marias.. 
Las Piedras. 
Loiza. 



Manati 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

Naguabo 

Naranjito 

Patillas 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas 

Rincon 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

Sabana Grande.. 

Salinas 

San German 

San Juan 

San Lorenzo 

San Sebastian- . . 

Santa Isabel 

ToaAlta 

Utuado 

Vega Baja 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

Yauco 



Total.. 



Valuation 

as of 
July 1, 1919. 



$2,785. 

1,540. 

381. 

1,885. 

912. 

103,957. 

200. 

20,400. 

220. 

4,458. 

4,355. 

14,044 

2,140. 

20. 

18,750. 

170, 



3,338. 

212. 

210. 

20. 

450. 

7,672. 

800. 

22,130. 

8,871. 

15. 

1,974. 

766. 

895. 

9,068. 

501. 

1,220. 

120. 

8,754. 

150. 

10, 180. 

55,643. 

100. 

1,012. 

720. 



31, 822. 

115. 

50. 

120. 

47,318. 

1,111. 

1,468. 

1,400. 

1,624,095. 

475. 

928. 

3,050. 

40. 

15,947. 

2,000. 

5,728. 

150. 

27,320. 



5,074,179.61 



Additions 
during year. 



$25,100.00 



9,750.00 



2,250.00 



1,500.00 



2,520.00 
5,100.00 



280.00 



Deductions 
during year. 



2,500.00 
50,910.00 



3,580.00 
4,450.00 
42,150.64 



1,340.00 
'2*566*66" 



13,080.00 



166,910.64 



$351.00 



21.00 
600.00 



30.00 



308.00 



100.00 



590.00 



114,218.77 

moo" 



117,592.57 



Valuation 

as of 

June 30, 1920. 



$2,785.00 

1,540.00 

381.00 

1,885.00 

912.00 

103,606.00 

200.00 

20,400.00' 

220.00 

4,458.00 

29,455,00 

14,023.96 

1,540.00 

20.00 

18,750.00 

170.00 

9,750.00 

3,338.00 

212.00 

180.00 

20.00 

450.00 

9,922.14 

800.00 

22,130.00 

8,563.70 

15.00 

1,974.00 

766.00 

895.00 

9,068.80 

2,001.00 

1,120.00 

120. 00 

8,754.82 

150.00 

10,180.00 

58, 139. 82 

5,200.00' 

422.00 

720.00 

280.00 

31,522.00 

115.00 

50.00 

2,620.00 

98,228.00 

1,111.00 

4,148.00 

5,850.00' 

4,552,027.44 

475.00' 

778.00 

4,390.00 

40.00 

18,447.00 

2,000.00 

5,728.00 

150.00 

40,400.00 



5,123,597.68 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



219 



Exhibit No. 12. — Statement showing locations and valuations of public buildings exclusive 
of real estate^ owned by the insular government as of June SO, 1920. 



Buildings and municipalities. 


Valuation as 

of July 1, 

1919. 


Additions 
during year. 


Deductions 
during year. 


Valuation as 

of June 30, 

1920. 


Adjuntas: Rural school, Barrio Pastillo 

Aguada: Rural school. Barrio Atalaya 


$250.00 
250.00 

250.00 
250.00 






$250.00 






250.00 


Aguas Buenas: 

Rural school , Barrio Jagueyes 






250.00 


Rural school, Barrio Mulas 






250.00 


Aibonito: 

Road house No. 21, Carretera No. 1 


400.00 






400.00 


Road house No. 22, Carretera No. 1 


1,200.00 
750.00 
250.00 

50.00 

1,400.00 
3,300.00 
16,590.00 
75,386.00 
5,080.00 
694.00 
250.00 

1,600.00 
250.00 

250.00 

750.00 

118,498.23 

2,000.00 
100.00 
50.00 
100.00 
500.00 
150.00 
750.00 
750.00 

250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 

1,000.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 

600.00 
750.00 
750.00 

3,396.61 
140.00 

1,060.00 
1,500.00 

5,000.00 
2,810.00 
12,448.17 
3,000.00 
750.00 

250.00 
250.00 

2.50.00 
250.. 00 
250.00 

2,200.00 

24,983.61 

250.00 

250.00 

750.00 

500.00 

25.00 






1,200.00 


Road house No. 23, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Rural school, Barrio Casey Abajo 






250.00 


Afiasco: Wooden house in parcel of land in Reg. 
3 of Afiasco 






50.00 


Arecibo: 

Sanitation office 






1,400.00 


Sanitation stable 






3,300.00 
16,590.00 
75,386.00 


District court and police quarters 






District jail building 






Municipal court building ^ 




$5,080.00 




A cement well 




694.00 


Arroyo: Rural school, Barrio Antigua 






250.00 


Barros: 

Frame building, town 






1,600.00 


Rural school . Barrio Barros 






250.00 


Bayamon: 

Road house No. 1, Carretera No. 2 






250.00 


Road house No. 2, Carretera No. 2 






750.00 


Cabo Rojo: Reform school 






118,498.23 

2,000.00 
100.00 


Caguas: 

Government building 






Road house No. 10, Carretera No. 1 






Road house No. 11, Carretera No. 1 






50.00 


Road house No. 12, Carretera No. 1 






100.00 


Road house No. 13, Carretera No. 1 






500.00 


Road house No. 14, Carretera No. 1 






150.00 


Road house No, 15, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Road house No. 16, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Camuy: 

Rural school, Barrio Camuy Arriba 






250.00 


Rural school, Barrio Piedra Gorda 






250.00 


Rural school, Barrio Puente 






250.00 


Rural school, Barrio Yeguada 






250.00 


Cayey: 

Road house No. 2, Carretera No. 4 






1,000.00 


Road house No. 17, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Road house No. 18, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Road house No. 19, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Road house No. 20, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Road house 






750.00 


Coamo: 

Road house No. 24, Carretera No. 1 






600.00 


Road house No. 25, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Road house No. 26, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Culebra: 

Public building and cistern 






3,396.61 


Rural school 






140.00 


Fajardo: 

Customhouse 






1,060.00 


Wooden house. . . 






1,500.00 


Guayama: 

Offices, irrigation service 






5,000.00 
2,810.00 
12,448.17 


Sanitation stable 






Districtjail .... 






Road house No. 3, Carretera No. 4 






3,000.00 
750.00 


Road house No. 4, Carretera No. 4 






Guaynabo: 

iRural school, Barrio Guaraguaos 






250.00 


Rural school. Barrio " Pueblo Viejo" 

Hatillo: 

Rural school, Barrio Bayanev 






250.00 






250.00 


Rural school, Barrio Yeguadilla Occidental. 






250.00 


Rural school. Barrio Pajuil 






250.00 


Humacao: 

Registrar of nroperty and post office building 






2,200.00 
24,983.61 


District iail 


1 


Rural school. Barrio Buena Vista 






250.00 


Jayuya: Rural school, Barrio Collores 






250.00 


Juana Diaz: 

Road house No. 27, Carretera No. 1 






750.00 


Road house No. 28, Carretera No. 1 




• 


500.00 
25.00 


Wooden house 







220 



BEPOBT OF THE GOVERNOB OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 12. — Statement showing locations andvaluations of public buildings exclusive 
of real estate, owned by the insular government as of June SO, 1920 — Continued. 



Buildings and municipalities. 


Valuation as 

of July 1, 

1919. 


Additions 
during year. 


Deductions 
during year. 


Valuation as 

of June 30, 

1920. 


Las Marias: Rural school,!Barrio Anones... . . . . 

Mayaguez: m^ m 

Captain of the port building 


$250.00 

5,500.00 

10,578.64 

2,749.50 

700.00 

19,042.27 

67,257.03 
590.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 

250.00 
250.00 

250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 

45,000.00 

109,000.00 

4,000.00 

1,380.00 

5,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

500.00 

750.00 

750.00 

3,600.00 
1,439.61 
21,206.53 
500.00 
150.00 
160.00 
160.00 
160.00 
600.00 






$250:00 






5,500.00 

10,578.64 

2,749.60 

700 00 


Buildings on United States experimental 
station grounds 






Sanitation stable 






Frame building, San Jose Street 






Laboratory building 






19,042.27 

67,257.03 
500 00 


Building for College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts 






Frame building, Mona Island 






Road houseNo.i,Carretera No.2,to Anasco. 
Road house No. 2,Carretera No.2, to Anasco 






750 00 






750 00 


Road house No. l,Carretera No. 2,to Yauco. 
Road house No. 2,CarreteraNo.2, to Yauco 






750 00 






750 00 


Moca: 

Rural school, Barrio Centre 






250 00 


Rural school. Barrio Aceituna Abajo 






256.00 


Morovls: 

Rural school. Barrio Guzman 






250 00 


Rural school. Barrio Perchas 






250 00 


Rurid school. Barrio Franquez • 






250.00 
250 00 


Naraniito: Rural school. Barrio Guadrana 

Ponuelas: Rural school, Barrio Coto 










250 00 


Ponce: 

Blind asylum 






45,000.00 

109,000.00 

4,000.00 

1,380.00 

5 000 00 


Insular courts and jails 






CantaiTi of the ■Dort bulldin? ...... r .. ^ .... . 






Sanitation ofQce 






Sanitation stable 






Road house No 29 Carretera No. 1 






500 00 


Road house No. 30, Carretera No. 1 






500 00 


Road house No 31 Carretera No. 1 






500 00 


Road house No. 1, Carretera No. 6 






750 00 


Road house No 2, Carretera No. 6 






750 00 


Rio Piedras: 

Police barracks 






3,600.00 

1,439.61 

23,023.75 

500 00 


Convalescencia Park 






Experimental station buildings 


$1,817.22 




Road house No 4. Carretera No. 1 




Road house No 5 Carretera No. 1 






150 00 


Road house No 6, Carretera No. 1 






160 00 


Road house No. 7, Carretera No. 1 






160.00 


Road house No. 8, Carretera No. 1 






160 00 


Road house No 9 Carretera No. 1 






600 00 


Insular sanatorium for tuberculosis 


48,553.09 
18,400.00 




48,553.09 
18,400.00 


Quarantine hosnital 






SabsiMi Grande: 

Framft hiiildlnflr 


40.00 
250.00 

203,240.00 
159,578.72 
159,340.58 
122,180.00 
92,279.96 
80,150.00 
5,340.00 
21,750.00 

11,760.00 
57,540 00 

34,209.00 

92,008.50 
2,300.00 

10,012.93 
6,000.00 

29,290.00 
7,070.89 
4,713.90 

88,400.00 
800.00 
920.98 

14, 416. 84 

262.66 

6,020.^ 

4,869.82 


140. OC 


Rural school. Barrio Rincon 




250 00 


Ban Juan: 

Insane asvlum 






' 203,240.00 
159,578.72 
159,340.58 
122,180.00 
92,279.96 
80,150.00 
5,340.00 
21,750.00 

11,760.00 
57,540.00 

34 209 no 


Governor's palace 






Bovs* Charitv School 






Mifltary hospital 






L^islative assembly building 






Intendencia buildincr 






Pabellon de San Juan 






Pabellones del Estado Mayor 






Office of the executive secretary of Porto 
Rico 






Pink palace 






Masonry building used for offices of the in- 
Qiilar covftmiTiftnt 






Penitentiary 






92,008.50 
2,300.00 

10,012.93 
6,000.00 

29,290.00 
7,070.89 
4,713.90 

88,400.00 
800.00 
920 98 


Cantain of the Dort building 






Sanitation stable 






Education warehouse 






Police headquarters 






TntftHor warehou.se .• 






Naval hosnital 






Girls' Charity School 






Police barracks, Seboruco 






Sanitary laundry 






Oiiarantl'ne hospital 






14,416.84 
262 66 


R\oV anf mals' nuarantine 






Qnart^^nhaster 8 dock r-. 






6,020.00 
4.869.82 
19,600.00 


Sanitation offices, lener colonv 






Historical Archive..". .' 


19,600.00 





CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



221 



Exhibit No. 12. — Statement showing locations and valuations of public buildings exclusive 
of real estate, owned by the insular government as of June SOy 1920 — Continued. 



Buildings and municipalities. 


Valuation as 

of July 1, 

1919. 


Additions 
duriug year. 


Deductions 
during year. 


Valuation as 

of June 30, 

1920. 


San Juan— Continued. 

Market dace Puerta de Tierra 




$2,682.70 
5,062.15 




$2,682.70 
5, 062. 15 


Barriada Obrera 






Road house No 1 Garret era No. 1 


$300.00 
990.00 
120.00 
245. 00 
250.00 

250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
500.00 
7,600.00 




300.00 


Road house No. 2, Carretera No. 1 






990.00 


Road house No 3, Carretera No. 1 






120.00 


San Lorenzo' Rural school, Barrio Florida 






246.00 


Vega Alta: Rural school, Barrio Cienegueta 

Vega Baja: 

Rural school, Barrio Almirante Norte .... 






250.00 






250.00 


Rural school, Barrio Almirante Sur . 






250.00 


Rural school, Barrio Rio Prieto 






250.00 


Rural school Barrio Sierra Alta....... .... 







500. 00 


Vieques: Vieques jail 






7, 600. 00 










Total 


1,832,534.98 


75,882.70 


$5,120.00 


1,923,530.14 





Exhibit No. 13. — Statement of accrued trust fund liabilities as of June 30\, 1920. 
[Receipts and expenditures not to be confused with those on cash basis, Exhibit No. 31 . 

REDEMPTION FUND-rROAD-IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 

Balanceasof July 1,1919 $1,121,521.93 

Property tax collections 284, 941. 49 

Delmquent taxes as of June 30, 1920 4,991.66 

Total 1,411,456.08 

Interest on $1,000,000 4 per cent bonds payable June 30, 1920 (6 

months) $20,000.00 

Interest on $875,000 4 per cent bonds payable Dec. 31, 1919 16, 500. 00 

Interest on $775,000 4 per cent bonds payable June 30, 1920 16, 500. 00 

Bonds retired under sinking fund requirements Dec. 31, 1919 50, 000. 00 

Repayment of taxes improperly collected 144. 51 

102,144.61 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 $1,309,310.67 

MUNICIPAL BOND FUNDS. 

Deduction from taxes collected for municipalities 67, 794. 66 

Interest on bonds for year 65, 314. 72 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 2,479. 83 

CONSTRUCTION OF HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS AT SAN JUAN. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 $40,966.44 

Income billed 146.27 

Total 41,112.71 

Construction work 29, 226. 72 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 11, 885. 99 

SAN JUAN HARBOR FUND. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 HI, 822. 38 

Miscellaneous receipts 30, 209. 70 

Transfers 20,070. 84 

Total • 162,102.92 

Interest on $600,000 4 per cent bonds for year 24, 000. 00 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 : 138,102.02 

SCHOOL BOARD BOND FUNDS. 

Deductions from taxes collected for school boards 20, 182. 60 

Interest on bonds for year 20, 182. 60 

14748—20 ^15 



222 REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOB OF PORTO MOO. 

STUDENT ARMY TRAINING CORPS. 

TJNIVEESITY FUND. 

Balanceasof July 1.1919 137,164.61 

Proportion of court fees and fines $49,220.04 

Proportion of sanitary fines 1,136.63 

Escneated inheritance 4,434.62 

Proportion of sale of Government lands 911. 25 

Rent of property 2,449.44 

Sale of farm products and supplies 8, 447. 16 

Reimbursed by the United States Government for moneys ad- 
vanced for the Student Army Training Corps 3, 584. 44 

Miscellaneous 8,306.78 

Transfers 1,311.50 

Repayments 294.77 

80,096.62 

Total 117,251.23 

Expenses 62,983.96 

Advances to special disbursing officer 2, 700. 00 

65,683.96 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 $51,567.27 

TJNIVEESITY INCOME FUND. 

Balance as Of July 1, 1919 171.59 

Income from securities owned 355. 56 

Total 530.15 

ESCHEATED INHEEITANCE FUND. 

Balance as Of Juljr 1, 1919 •. 476.65 

Transferred to university fund » 476.65 

UNIVEESITY AGEICULTUEAL FUND. 

Federal appropriation, Morril-Hatch Act 50, 000. 00 

Interest on bank deposits 548. 80 

Miscellaneous 10.08 

Total 60,558.88 

Expenditures 50,509.98 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 48.90 

PEEMANENT UNIVEESITY FUND. 

Balance as of July 1. 1919 151.16 

Interest on bank balances 138.51 

Total 289.67 

SCHOOL BUILDING FUND. 

Balance as Of July 1, 1919 30,396.76 

Interest on loans $782.49 

Repayments on principal of loans 6, 355. 00 

Miscellaneous receipts 23,876.09 

Transfers 4,800.00 

35,813.58 

Total 66,210.34 

Expenditures 4,922.35 

Transfers 4,800.00 

9,722.36 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 66,487.99 

SCHOOL EXTENSION FUND, 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 660.40 

lEEIGATION FUND. 

Construction: 

Balanceasof July 1.1919 $17,083.96 

Collections during tne year 362.29 

Repayments 6,500.00 

Transfers 120,000.00 

Total 143,946.25 

Construction expenditures $37,354.01 ^g 

Transfers 20,000.00 ^j 

Advances to special disbursing officer 6, 500. 00 

63,854.01 

BalaiuM $80,092.24 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 223 

Ol)eration: 

Balance as of July 1,1919 152,071.81 

Repayment of unexpended balances by special 

disbursing officers $4,500.00 

Revenues from taxation 358, 245. 81 

Interest on bank deposits 3, 014. 05 

Miscellaneous receipts 179, 242. 86 

Transfers 95, 000. 00 

Loan from insular government 170, 000. 00 

810,002,72 

* 

Total 862,074.53 

Operation expenses 142, 437. 07 

Bonds retired 150, 000. 00 

Interest on bonds 193, 680. 00 

Advances to special disbursing officers 4, 500. 00 

Loan returned to insular government 140, 000. 00 

Transfers 175,000.00 

805,617.07 

Balance $56,457.46 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 $136,649.70 

OUTSTANDING LIABILITIES. 

Balance as of July 1,1919 14,952.49 

Amounts outstanding transferred during the year 2, 631. 64 

Total 17,584,13 

Old accounts presented for payment 929. 10 

Balance as o f June 30, 1920 16, 656. 03 

REDEMPTION OF MUNICIPAL BONDS. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 66, 043. 78 

Deduction from taxes collected for municipalities 65, 456. 22 

Total 131,500.00 

Payments to redeem bonds 69, 500. 00 

Balance as o f June 30, 1920 62, 000. 00 

REDEMPTION OF SCHOOL BOARD BONDS. 

Deductions from taxes collected for school boards 62, 500. 00 

Payments to redeem bonds 62,500. 00 

SANITARY FUND. 

Balance as Of July 1,1919 2,256.50 

Sanitary fines collected during the year 1, 136. 63 

Transfers 14.83 

Total 3,407.96 

Transfers 600. 00 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 2, 807. 96 

INSULAR POLICE RELIEF FUND. 

Balanceasof July 1, 1919 2,190.12 

Fines imposed on policemen 609. 27 

Proceeds of securities sold 1, 916. 00 

Total 4,715.39 

Value of securities sold $2, 000. 00 

Repayments to beneficiaries 1, 131. 20 

3,131.20 

Balance as fo June 30, 1920 1 , 584. 19 

SALE OF ARTICLES, GIRLS' CHARITY SCHOOL. 

Balanceasof July 1, 1919 1,269.69 

Sale of articles 4.00 

Total 1,273.69 

Expenses 612.54 

Balanceasof June 30, 1920 661.15 

SALE OF ARTICLES AND WORK DQNE, BOYS' CHARITY SCHOOL. 

Balanceasof July 1. 1919 1,284.14 

Sale of articles, band concerts, etc 291. 72 

Total 1,575.86 

Expenses 1, 199. 50 

Balanceasof June 30, 1920 376.36 



224 REPOBT OP THE GOYESENOB OF POBTO BICO. 

SALE OP ARTICLES, PENITENTL\RY. 

Balanceasof July 1,1919 $4,144.60 

Sale of articles 591. 48 

Total 4,736.08 

Expenses * 544. 04 

Balance as o f June 30, 1920 $4, 192 . 04 

BOYS' CHARITY SCHOOL, RECREATION FUND. 

Balanceofas July 1, 1919 1,171.61 

50 per cent of receipts from band concerts 115. 00 

Total 1,286.61 

Expenses 471. 82 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 814.79 

SECURITIES REFUNDING BONDS. 

Balanceasof July 1,1919 1,260,500.00 

Transfers 133, 000. 00 

Balanceasof June 30, 1920 1,127,500.00 

SECURITIES LOAN FUND. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 401, 000. 00 

Transfers 100, 000. 00 

301,030.00 

WORKMEN'S RELIEF TRUST FUND. 

Balance as of July 1 , 1919 60, 108. 24 

Collections during year 275,499. 24 

Repayment of unexpended balance by special disbursing officer 1 , 000' 00 

Total 336,607.48 

Advances to special disbursing officer %l, 000- 00 

Expenditures 192, 559. 22 

193, 559. 22 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 143,048.26 

LA EGIDA DEL MAESTRO. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 1, 027. 12 

Transfer 1 , 027. 12 

ROAD BOND FUND OF 1916. 

Balanceasof July 1,1919 304,704.26 

Proceeds of the sale of bonds 955, 000. 00 

Repayment of unexpended balances by special disbursing officers 5, 086. 36 

Miscellaneous 1, 454. 84 

Transfers 716,999.40 

Total 1,983,244.86 

Advances to special disbursing officers $55, 723. 35 

Expenses 510,684.84 

Transfers 716, 600. 00 

1,283,008.19 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 700,236.67 

SAI-E OF ARTICLES AND WORK DONE, REFORM SCHOOL. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 *. 35.14 

Sale of articles 7. 95 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 43. 09 

RECREATION FUND, REFORM SCHOOL. 

Balance as of Jul5^ 1, 1919 26. 28 

60 per cent of receipts from sale of articles 7.94 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 34. 22 

WHARF AND HARBOR FUND. 

Collections during the year 40, 157. 31 

Repa3rraent of unexpended balance by special disbursing officer 801. 76 

Total 940,59.07 

Advances to special disbursing officer $3, 800. 00 

Expenses 17, 088. 23 

Transfers 20, 070. 84 

^>^59.07 

GENERAL INCOME, INSULAR EXPERIMENTAL STATION. 

Balance as of July 1,1919 4,875.75 

Sale of farm products, insular experimental station 19, 096. 13 

Repayment of unexpended balance by special disbursing officer 315. 88 

Transfers 1, 402. 73 

Total 25,689.49 

$7,047.27 

Transfers 3, 602. 73 

Advances to special disbursing officer 1, 725. 00 

12,375.00 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 13, 3 14. 49 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 225 

FUND FOR THE PROTECTION OF COFFEE. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 $5, 966. 87 

Collections during year 7,912. 77 

Total 13,879.64 

Expenses 2, 304. 07 

Balanceasof June 30, 1920 $11,575.57 

CAPITOL BUILDING FUND. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 11,145.20 

Sale of land 14,185.00 

Total 25,330.20 

Transfers : 25, 330. 20 

TEACHER'S PENSION FUND. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 24,141.91 

Collections during year 36, 065. 66 

Transfer 1, 027. 12 

Total 61,234.69 

Pensions paid during year . 1, 806. 11 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 ^9,428.58 

MAGAZINE PUBLISHING FUND. * 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 281. 87 

Collections during year 4, 200. 00 

Total 4,481.87 

SPECLAX FUND, SAN ANTONIO-MARTIN PENA ROAD. 

Collections during year 65, 874. 12 

Repayment of taxes $2. 15 

Transfers 50, 000. 00 

50,002.15 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 15,871.97 

FOREST FUND. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 62. 15 

Collections during year 2, 174. 93 

Total 2,237.08 

Transfer 400. 00 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 1, 837. 08 

CAPITOL CONSTRUCTION FUND. 

Collections during year 341, 916. 04 

Transfers 25, 330. 20 

Total 367,246.24 

Expenses $1, 845. 68 

Transfers 3, 000. 00 

4,845.68 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 362, 400. 58 

PAJARDO-VIEQUES-CULEBRA LINE. 

Collections during year. 832. 40 

Expenditures 98. 98 

Balance as of June 3C, 1920 733. 42 

CONSTRUCTION OF RURAL SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

Balance as of July 1, 1919 8, 103. 94 

Transfers 7, 416. 20 

Total 15,520.14 

Expenses $5, 058. 03 

Transfers 7,416. 20 

12,474.23 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 3, 045. 91 

MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUND. 

Food commission special fund 3,385. 25 

Expenses, sale of Government property 311. 04 

Las Casas police barracks 1, 050. 00 

Homestead trust fund 303. 42 

Juncos special tax 4, 757. 87 

San Lorenzo special tax : 2, 428. 07 

Balance as of June 30, 1920 12,236.65 

Total trust fund balance 4, 553, 692. 26 



226 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 






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228 



REPOBT or THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. Ib.— Univeraity of Porto Rico^Balance sheety June SO, 1920. 

ASSETS. 

Cash in hands of treasurer of Porto Rico: 

University fund $51,031.37 

University agricultural fund 48. 90 

University income fund 530. 15 

Permanent university fund 289. 67 

Purchase and maintenance of supplies in the laboratories, College of Agriculture 

and Mechanic Arts ^ 17, 062. 14 

Expenses, University of Porto Rico 3. 21 

$68,965.44 

Cash in hands of secretary-treasurer, University of Porto Rico 48. 85 

Investments: 

Liberty bonds 800. 00 

Penuelas bonds 10, 000. 00 

Porto tlico Fruit Exchange stock 20. 00 

10,820.00 

Real estate and improvements at Rio Piedras: 

Baldorioty, normal and practice buildings 121, 101. 98 

Campus and farm 38, 052. 75 

Farm buildings 14,907.60 

174,062.33 

Real estate at Mayaguez owned by The People of Porto Rico and used by the 
university: 

Buildings of the College of Agriculture 49, 640. 00 

Campus 5, 500. 00 

Farm and buildings 12, 350. 00 

67,490.00 

Miscellaneous equipment (see Schedule A) 120, 716. 43 

rPotal assets* 

Trustees, University of Porto Rico 374, 613. 05 

The People of Porto Rico 67,490.00 

442,103.05 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL. 

Universitv'of Porto Rico: 

Liability, Mimoz Rivera memorial fund 48. 85 

Capital (present worth) 374,564. 20 

374,613.05 

The People of Porto Rico (College of Agriculture) 67, 490. 00 

442, 103. 05 

Exhibit No. 15, Schedule A. — Ur.iversity of Porto Rico — Detailed statement of mis- 
cellaneous equipment. 



Rio 
Piedras. 



Mayaguez. 



Total. 



Library books 

Textbooks 

Scientific apparatus 

Athletic and military equipment 

Machinery and tools 

Livestock 

Vehicles and harness 

Furniture and fixtures 

Total 



$8,657.09 

11,510.47 

15,717.89 

1,003.32 

6,661.21 

300.00 

232.48 

13,821.99 



$4,613.14 
1,983.91 

22,046.51 
795. 42 

19,353.70 
2,272.51 
2,752.55 
8,994.24 



57,904.45 



62,811.98 



$13,270.23 

13,494.38 

37,764.40 

1,798.74 

26,014.91 

2,672.51 

2,985.03 

22,816.23 



120,716.43 



COJS^SOLIDATED FUSTANCIAL EXHIBITS. 229 

Exhibit No. 16. — University of Porto Rico — Surplus account as of June 30 y 1920, 

Balanceasof July 1,1919 J334,333.43 

Appropriations: 

Federal, Merrill-Nelson fund 160,000.00 

Insular- 
Expenses, University of Porto Rico 65, 000. 00 

Purchase and maintenance of supplies in the laboratories, Mayaguez 25, 000. 00 

140,000,00 

Revenues: 

Court fines and fees 50, 545. 67 

Sale of public lands 931. 25 

Escheated inheritances 4,*444. 15 

65,921.07 

Other income: 

Reimbursement from War Department account Students' Army Training 

Corps 3,684.44 

Students' fees, Rio Piedras 6, 492. 15 

Students' fees, Mayaguez 1, 476. 37 

Rent of farm and buildings, Rio Piedras 2, 449. 44 

Sale of farm produce, Mayaguez 2, 131. 05 

Interest on investments 474. 07 

Interest on Merrill-Nelson fund 648. 80 

Net gain on property sold 69. 56 

Property received by transfer 605. 17 

Miscellaneous 10. 50 

17,841.55 

548,096.04 

Operating expenses as per Exhibit No. 17: 

College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts 65, 918. 13 

Rio Piedras colleges 99, 100. 61 

Office of board of trustees 4,496.80 

169,514.54 

Balance of appropriation written off .01 

Property transferred to The People of Porto Rico 2, 044. 18 

Property condemned 1, 973. 11 

4,017.30 

Surplusasof June 30, 1920 374,664.20 

548,096.04 



230 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 17. — University of Porto Rico, 

A. OPERATING EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1920, CLASSIFIED. 



Mayaguez. 



Rio 
Piedras. 



San Juan 
ofl&ce. 



Repairs and improvements 

Salaries of instructors 

Teachers' pensiofffund 

Other salaries and wages 

Supplies, stationery, and printing . 

Light, water, fuel, and power 

Teleimone, telegraph, dind cable. . . 

Traveling expenses 

Freight and postage 

Insurance 

Incidentals 

Farm and grounds 

Student labor 

Student assistants 

Ordnance materials 



$41,502.61 

412. 11 

4,941.49 

7,353.35 

1,135.65 

126.14 

334. 02 

1, 790. 39 

421. 33 

426.76 

. 5,859.98 

1,466.65 



147.65 



Total 

Grand total. . 



65,918.13 



$7,415.00 

71, 444. 81 

731. 03 

10,492.11 

6,086.61 

1, 106. 29 

144. 27 

9.45 

667. 64 

212. 95 

140. 86 



354.30 

295.29 



99, 100. 61 



$3, 897. 78 
247.53 



20.11 
266.17 
51.21 



13.00 



4, 495. 80 
169,514.54 



B. OPERATING EXPENSES, MAYAGUEZ AND RIO PIEDRAS, AND EXPENDITURES FOR 
EQUIPMENT DISTRIBUTED BY COLLEGES. 



Equij)- 
ment. 



Salaries of 
instructors. 



Other ex- 



Total. 



College of agriculture. . 

Normal college 

College of liberal arts - . 
College of pharmacy. . . 

College of law 

University high school 

Total 



$7,485.17 
1,284.79 
800.70 
746. 40 
987.31 
926.95 



$38,314.72 
29,986^83 
8,157.52 
7,295.83 
10,048.33 
9,356.37 



$27,604.41 
14,483.19 
4,659.20 
5,026.60 
4,514.91 
5,571.83 



$73,404.30 
45,754.81 
13,617.42 
13,068.83 
15,550.55 
15,855.16 



12,231.32 



103,159.60 



61,860.14 



177,251.06 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



231 



Exhibit No 18 —University of Porto Rico— Additions to, and deductions from, capital 
accounts for the period from July 1, 1919, to June SO, 1920. 



A.— RIO PIEDBAS. 

Heal estate and improvemeiits, board of trustees. 

Miscellaneous equipment: 

Library books 

Textbooks 

Scientific apparatus 

Athletic and military 

Machinery and tools 

Live stock 

Vehicles and harness - 

Furniture and fixtures 



Total. 



B.— MAYAGUEZ. 

Real estate, The People of Porto Rico. 



Miscellaneous equipment: 

Library books 

Textbooks • 

Scientific apparatus 

Athletic and military. . 
Machinery and tools. . . 

Livestock 

Vehicles and harness. . - 
Furniture and fixtures . 



Total. 



C— TOTAL FOR THE UNIVERSITY. 

Real estate and improvements 

Miscellaneous equipment: 

Library books 

Textbooks 

Scientific apparatus 

Athletic and military 

Machinery and tools 

Live stock 

Vehicles and harness 

Fiuniture and fixtures 



Total July 
1,1919. 



$170,062.33 



7,440.65 

10,125.78 

13,904.88 

994.50 

6,619.38 

300.00 

247.23 

13,995.43 



53,627.80 



67,490.00 



Additions. 



Deductions. 



$1,303.67 

4,403.77 

1,933.20 

15.50 

140.88 



84.00 



7,881.02 



Total. 



,013.87 
,410.26 
,536.65 
799.85 
,278.62 
,412.51 
,027.18 
,560.00 



57,038.94 



241,552.33 



11,454.52 

11,535.99 

29,441.53 

1,794.35 

25,898.00 

2,712.51 

5,274.41 

22,555.43 



779.36 

2,585.32 

8,358.98 

20.50 

250.53 

650.00 

16.66 

434.24 



13,095.59 



110,666.74 



2,083.03 

6,989.09 

10,292.18 

36.00 

391.41 

650.00 

16.66 

518.24 



20,976.61 



$87.23 

3,019.03 

120.19 

6.68 

99.05 



14.75 
257.44 



Total June 
30,1920. 



$170,062.33 



8,667.09 
11,510.47 
15,717.89 
1,003.32 
6,66L21 
2,300.00 
232.48 
13,821.90 



3,604.37 



180.09 

2,011.67 

1,849.12 

24.93 

175.45 

790.00 

2,291.29 



7,322.55 



267.32 

5,030.70 

1,969.31 

31.61 

274.50 

790.00 
2,306.04 

257. 44 



10,926.92 



57,904.45 



67,490.00 



4,613.14 
1,983.91 

22,046.51 
795.42 

19,353.70 
2,272.51 
2,752.55 
8,994.24 



62,811.98 



241,552.33 

13,270.23 

13,494.38 

37,764.40 

1,798.74 

26,014.91 

2,572.51 

2,985.03 

22,816.23 



120,716.43 



232 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Exhibit No. 19. — Statement showing the amount of taxes pending on June 30 y 1920 , 



Municipality. 


1901-2 


1902-3 


1903-4 


1904r-5 


190S-6 


1906-7 


1909- 
10 


1910- 
11 


1911- 
12 


1912- 
13 


1913- 
14 


1914- 
15 


1915-16 


Adjuntas 




























Aguadilla 




























Aibonito 




























Anasco 


























$26.40 
16.26 
9.60 
7.32 
2.40 
36.60 


Arecibo 


























Arroyo 


























Barceloneta 


























Bayamon 


























Caguas 


























Camuy 


























Carolina 




























Cayey 


























51.00 


Ceiba 


























Cidra 


























4.80 


Coamo 


























Corozal 




























Culebra 




























Dorado 


























1.20 


Fajardo 


























Guanica 


























5.88 
2L76 


Guayama 


























Guaynabo 


























Gurabo 


























1.20 
9.24 


Hatillo 


























Hmnacao 


























IsabeJa 




























Juana Diaz 


























3.60 
1.80 


Lajas 


























Lares 


























Las Marias 




























Loiza 


























1.50 


Luquillo 


























Manati 




























Mayaguez 




















$313. 16 






39.60 


Moca 














' 










Naguabo 


























6.00 


Naranjito 


























Patillas 


























1.80 

139. 70 

7.20 

27.96 

12.00 


Ponce 


























Rio Grande 


























Rio Piedras 


























Sabana Grande.. 


























Salinas 


























San German 


























4.20 

1,006.22 

36.00 


San Juan 














$28.00 


i{3gg4ftirv>FA 


64.48 


$103.48 


$64.48 


San Sebastian 


















Santa Isabel 


























Toa Alta 




























Toabaja 




























TruJilloAlto 


























4.80 
18.36 
3.60 
2.40 


Utuado 


$13.52 


$56.42 


$42.60 


$30.90 


$3.24 
















Vega Alta 














VeeaBaja 


























Yabucoa 


























Yauco 


























** 


Corporaciones 
























724.54 


890.49 


























Total 


13.62 


56.42 


42.60 


30.90 


3.24 


3.54 


28.00 


139.84 


100.66 


377.64 


103. 48 


789.02 


2,400.89 



1 No amounts pending for 1907-1909. 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 233 

for fiscal years 1901-2 to 1919-^0^ percentage^ and reasons why they are pending,^ 



1916-17 


1917-18 


1918-19 


Total. 


1919-20 


Grand 
total. 


Per cent 
pending 
June 30, 
1920, 
for all 
fiscal 
years. 


Pending 
judicial 
action. 


Pay- 
ments 

ex- 
tended. 


Prob- 
ably 
uncol- 
lectible. 


In 
claims. 




$2.76 
2.40 


$2.40 
31.20 
9.00 
32.88 
549. 66 


$5.16 
33.60 
10.46 
59.28 

978. 18 
9.60 
42.52 

113.70 

237.58 
24.24 
2.16 

115.12 


$29.94 
52.08 
72.00 
12.36 

502.50 


$35. 10 

85.68 

82.46 

71.64 

1,480.68 

9.60 

76.18 

341.58 

272.08 

97.26 

13.68 

132.40 

9.60 

67.56 

45.30 

4.36 

1.00 

5.00 

89.56 

80.42 

75.10 

19.46 

14.40 

29.06 

43.18 

24.00 

40.66 

20.10 

5.10 

581.16 

28.76 

6.24 

51.18 

984. 73 

9.00 

20.02 

1.86 

5.54 

1,012.18 

29.40 

202. 15 

23.82 

6.60 

24.72 

13,108.56 

70.96 

57.36 

33.73 

34.06 

40.80 

209.78 

95.04 

24.24 

14.50 

61.56 

46,701.38 


0.01 
.03 
.05 
.03 
.13 

.06 
.05 
.04 
(2) 
.04 
.01 
.06 
.01 

.12 
.03 
.03 

.01 

«.oi 

.01 
.01 
.01 
.07 

(«) 

(«) 

.04 
.01 

K 

.03 
.01 
.03 
.01 
.04 
.04 
.07 


$15.12 


$14.82 
49.68 


$5.16 

33.60 

10.46 

41.64 

335.28 

9.60 

65.20 

151.98 

272.08 

86.10 

13.68 

131.20 

9.60 

41.40 

33.78 

4.36 

1.00 

4.10 

89.56 

80.42 

75.10 

2.18 

14.40 

25.22 

43.18 

24.00 

35.98 

20.10 






$2.40 


SI. 46 


72.00 






30.00 
1,122.84 




96.00 


316.26 


22.56 






4.36 
23.58 
11.62 


6.60 
40.74 
81.12 


24.24 
46.98 
108.24 
24.24 
2.16 
29.52 


33.66 
227.88 
34.50 
73.02 
11.52 
17.28 
9.60 
31.08 
19.38 






10.98 


98.04 


46. 18 


45.38 






11.16 












4.36 


30.24 






1.20 










12.00 
5.04 


19.68 
20.88 


36.48 

25.92 

4.36 




26.16 






10.08 


1.44 


4.36 












1.00 

.90 

84.76 

9.60 
17.68 
17.28 
10.80 

3.84 








2.90 






4.10 

4.80 

70.82 

57.42 

2.18 

3.60 

25.22 

43.18 

24.00 

35.98 

12.90 

2.40 

112.92 

11.96 

1.44 

51.18 

644.44 




.90 




3.00 
13.20 
24.42 


1.80 
33.60 

8.84 






18.14 
2.40 
2.18 



















17.28 




2.40 

2.40 

15.60 

24.00 

5.40 

2.40 

2.40 

112.92 

5.06 

1.44 

17.16 

263.40 









11.18 

8.86 


2.40 

18.72 




3.84 

















26.98 
8.70 




4.68 
7.20 
2.70 
468.24 
16.80 
4.80 






4.68 
















5.10 








464. 76 


5.40 
28.76 

6.24 
51.18 
174.24 


111.00 




5.40 














15.66 
28.28 


18.36 








340.29 
9.00 
9.00 




809.29 
9.00 


1.20 










2.52 


3.00 
1.86 

"'"si .'36 

7.56 

39.24 

8.40 

5.40 


11.52 

1.86 

5.54 

294.22 

21.72 

167.33 

20.40 

5.40 

4.20 

6,530.39 

63.76 

57.36 

33.73 

17.26 

40.80 

204.98 

72.96 

24.24 

14.50 

13,80 

27,699.87 




20.52 

1.86 

5.54 

985.52 

7.20 

202. 15 

23.82 

6.60 

9.60 

8,396.62 

66.16 

57.36 

33.73 

34.06 

4.80 

164.00 

72.96 

24.24 

14.50 

58.56 

3,571.25 












2.18 
60.80 


1.56 
42.36 

6.96 
60.60 










717.96 

7.68 

34.82 

3.42 

1.20 

20.52 

6,578.17 

7.20 




26.66 
3.60 






18.60 


39.53 


























1.80 
189.66 


13.32 

4,234.10 

4.80 




1,218.36 
21.76 


1,341.83 

6.00 
47.88 

2.40 
11.16 
12.00 

9.60 
12.36 

8.40 


2,463.04 


288. 18 


9.48 






31.33 
6.10 


""ie.'sc 
















24.00 
6.60 
57.00 
13.44 


36.00 






20.20 


4.80 
22.08 




45.78 






22.08 










14.50 










6.60 
8,942.44 


7.20 
15,615.06 


47.76 
19,001.51 


3.00 
41,136.26 






1,527.34 


1,993.87 






3,213.12 


11,097.33 


19,712.54 


38,112.74 


28,599.29 


66,712.03 


.21 


41,584.52 


8,853.82ll5,687.23 


586.46 



« Pending less than 0.01 per cent. 



234 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 






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236 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Exhibit No. 21. — Statement showing distribution of property tax collections for tlie year 
ending June 30, 1919, and June 30, 1920. 





1920 


1919 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Tax collections: 

Current year 


$3,471,009.00 
54,856.10 


$3,201,356.01 
22,649.89 


$269,653.59 
32,206.21 




Prior years 








Total collections 


3,525,865.70 
224,754.79 


3,224,005.90 
98,748.89 


301,859.80 
126,008.90 




Protested taxes collected in previous 
years distributed . . ... 








Total taxes distributed 


3,750,620.49 


3,322,751.79 


427,868.70 








Distribution: 

Insular government- 
General purposes 0.1 of 1 per cent. . 
General purposes 0.25 of 1 per cent . 
Bond redemption 


342,905.89 

4,119.05 

284,941.49 

40,605.46 

1 249,255.76 


254,916.40 

2,410.72 

252,922.09 

116,749.22 

571,871.32 


87,909.49 

1,708.93 

32,018.90 








Sanitation purposes 


$70,665.77 
321,815.56 


Excess over l^gal maxima trans- 
ferred to insular revenues- 
Municipalities 




School boards 




Total 


927,906.24 
2,822,714.25 


1,190,070.25 

2,017,207.98 

107,473.56 


121,717.32 
805,506.27 


391,881.33 


Municipalities and school boards 


Protested taxes 


107,473.66 




i 




Total distribution 


3,750,620.49 


3,322,761.79 


927,223.59 


499,354.89 





Exhibit No, 22. — Receipts and disbursements of the insular government for the fiscal 

year ending June 30, 1920. 
InAilar revenues: 

Balance July 1, 1919 $838,385.93 

Receipts^- 

Excessover legal municipal and school boards maxima (Law No. 70 of 

1916, see Exhibit No. 30) $249,255.76 

United States internal revenues 286, 503. 53 

Customs 300, 000. 00 

Internal revenues— 

Excise taxes i $2,985,239.11 

Property taxes, insplar proportion — 

0.1 of Ipercent $342,905.89 

0.25 of 1 per cent 4, 119. 65 

347,025.54 

Income taxes 2, 458, 575. 63 

Inheritance taxes 41, 933. 43 

Proportion of municipal income for sanitation 46, 683. 45 

5, 879, 457. 16 

Miscellaneous- 
Ordinary •. 523,353.72 

Municipal bond redeemed 107, 500. 00 

School board bonds redeemed 127,000.00 

Repayments is ee exhibit No. 26) 1, 517* 506. 39 

Transfers from trust funds 533, 590. 35 

9,524,166.91 

Total insular revenues receipts, including balance of July 1, 1919 10, 362, 662. 84 

Disbursements — 

Fiscal year appropriations 6, 641, 661 . 00 

No-flscal year appropriations 1, 786, 781 . 98 

Indefinite- 
Advances to municipalities $27, 756. 89 

Miscellaneous 320, 277. 09 

348,033.98 

Bonds redeemed— 

Municipal 107, 600. 00 

School boards 127,000.00 

234,600.00 

Transfers to trust fund 295, 161. 73 



9,306,138.69 
Balance, June 30, 1920 1, 056, 414. 16 



1 This amount includes $41,117.50 representing excise taxes protested during previous years and covered 
into insular revenues during 1919-20. 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 237 

Trust funds: 

Balance July 1, 1919 $4,183,930.43 

Receipts (see Exhibit No. 31) $6,866,453.82 

Transfers from insular revenues 295, 161. 73 

7,161,615.55 

Total trust fundSjincluding balance of July 1, 1919 11, 345, 545*98 

Expenditures (see Exhibit No. 31) 5, 782, 234. 18 

Transfers to insular revenues 533, 590. 35 

6,315,824.53 

Balance, June 30, 1920 6,029,721.45 

Total balance, insular revenues and trust fund 6, 086, 135. 60 

Insular revenues: 

Cash 1,047,414.15 

Bonds unpledged 9, 000. 00 

1,056,414.15 

Trust funds: 

Cash 3,600,721.45 

Bonds pledged 1,429,000.00 

5,029,721.45 

6,086,135.60 

Exhibit No. 23. — Comparative statement of excise stamp sales detailed by sources ^ fiscal 
years 1917-18, 1918-19, 1919-20, 

SCHEDULE A— EXCISE PROPER. 





1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


Distilled spirits: 

Domestic 


$209,423.21 
15,280.46 
7,979.56 


$147,910.77 
16,450.61 


$182,222.06 


Imported ... 


18.271.71 


Alcohol in medicine, cosmetics etc 










Total . 


232,683.23 


164,361.38 


200,493.77 






Near beer: 

Domestic 


50,775.53 
34,569.64 


45,996.66 
11,833.89 


21,445.52 


Imported 


4,139.87 






Total 


85,345.17 


57,830.55 


25,585.39 






Wine: 

Imported 


18,201.08 
1,071.20 


566.95 
64.40 


372.80 


Sparkling wine 


102.30 






Total 


19,272.28 
4,225.47 


631.35 


475. 10 


Champagne 










Cigars 


321,325.97 
725,100.38 


304,418.12 
917,553.29 


336,846.74 


Cigarettes 


1,152,849.14 






Total 


1,046,426.35 


1,221,971.41 


1,489,695.88 






Picadura and fine-cut chewing tobacco: Special stamps 


4,873.74 


3,729.18 


3,522.« 


Perfumery: 

Domestic 


6,448.68 
10,689.87 


14,292.85 
18,512.24 


26,503.23 


Imported 


48,654.79 






Total 


17,138.55 


32,805.09 


75,158.02 






Patent medicines: 

Domestic 


3,110.60 
62,822.86 


5,051.50 
94,004.26 


6,354.68 


Imported 


149,903.53 






Total 


65,933.46 


99,055.76 


156,258.21 






Cosmetics, lotions, toilet matter, etc.: 

Domestic 


5,909.47 
5,985.99 


14,477.74 
10,472.37 




Imported 








Total ... 


11,895.46 


24,950.11 









Cards ,. 


12,661.60 

9,568.87 


9,978.25 
4,401.76 


20,367.50 
9,740.25 


Arms and ammimition 




Total 


22,230.37 


14,380.01 


30, 107. 75 






14748—20 ^16 









238 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 23. — Comparative statement of excise stamp sales detailed by sources^ fiscal 
years 1917-18, 1918-19, 1919-20~Contm\iQd. 



SCHEDULE A— EXCISE PROPER— Continued. 





1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


Matches: 

Domestic 






$100. 00 


Imported 


$56,343.39 


$44,506.30 


37,407.71 






Total . . . 


56,343.39 


44,506.30 


37,507.71 




Total, excise proper 


1,666,367.47 


1,664,221.14 


2,018,804.62 





SCHEDULE B-LICENSE TAXES. 



Manufacturers: 
Distilleries.. 
Rectifiers. . . 
Perfumery.. 

Cigars 

Cigarettes... 
Medicines... 
Strippers... 

Dealers 

Near beer... 



Total. 



Wholesale dealers: 
DistiUed spirits.. 
Malt beverage . . . 



Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Arms and ammunition 

Perfumery 

Denatured alcohol 

Leaf tobacco 

Chewing tobacco 

Cigars and cigarettes in vehicles.. 



Total. 



Retail dealers: 

Malt beverages 

Cigars and dfgarettes 

Arms and ammunition . 

Perfumery 

Peddlers' perfumery 

Denatured alcohol 



Total. 



Opium licenses , 

Gamekeepers , 

Physicians 

Intoxicating drinks 

Nonlntoxicating drinks. 
Billiard or pool tables..., 



Total 

Total, Schedule B . 



1,325.00 
5,700.00 
1,385-00 
4,098.75 
3,300.00 

355. 00 

3,590.00 

20.00 

100.00 



19,873.75 



857.50 
810.00 
855.00 
103.00 
356.00 
455. 00 
803. 00 
125.00 
172.50 
270.00 
25.00 



41,832.00 



46,987.25 
60,653.25 
1,962.50 
9,958.75 
736.75 
607.50 



120,906.00 



658.62 

4,830.00 

203.00 

506.00 

4,019.50 



10,217.12 



192,828.87 



1,155.00 



1,400.00 
3,474.50 
4,400.00 
370.00 
13,650.00 
17,140.00 
100.00 



41,689.50 



775.00 
3,136.00 



4,054.75 
7,544.00 
1,095.00 
3,687.50 
195.00 



12,885.00 
100.00 



33,422.25 



14,326.00 
63,763.25 

1,637.50 
11,548.75 

1,051.50 
737.50 



93,064.50 



623.72 
4,920.00 

129.00 
1,721.00 



7,393.72 



176,569.97 



2,125.00 



3,665.00 
4,211.25 
4,200.00 
1,396.00 
11,116.00 
12,015.00 
60.00 



38,776.25 



6,213.50 



6,040.00 

9,479.50 

310.00 

8,842.50 

365.00 

19,312.50 

10,425.00 

203.00 



0,181.00 



16,240.00 

77,473.00 

3,176.00 

36,866.25 



1,480.00 



135,234.26 



3,127.49 
'i, '079 .'66 



10,159.34 



14,366.83 



248,657.83 



SCHEDULE C-DOCUMENTARY. 



Notarial instruments 

Tax certificates 

Registrars of property . . . 

Blank books 

Law pamphlets 

Administrative fines 

Stamp sales unclassified . 

Total, Schedule C. 



221,935.12 

1,369. 00 

94,367.04 

1,541.61 

171.04 

2,215.85 



321,699.66 



270,202.91 

1,276.50 

96,310.00 

628.59 

70.64 

3,044.88 



371,433.42 



320,805.35 

1,304.50 

114,175.43 

764.46 

200.00 

3,649.80 



440,889.64 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



239 



Exhibit No. 23. — Comparative statement of excise stamp sales detailed by sources, fiscal 
years 1917-18, 1918-19, 1919-20— QontimxQ^, 



SCHEDULE D— LUXURIES. 





1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


Motor vehicles and accessories, etc 


$28,354.58 

375.88 

699.92 

1,049.49 

.47 


194,446.40 

1,466.97 

1,596.25 

4,007.80 

981.41 

2.62 

46.22 


1141,266.78 


Phonographs 


3,502.99 


Pianos and pianolas 


2,976.29 


Films !!^. .!:..::. ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


33,297.32 


Diamonds, precious stones 


35,285.61 


Photographic cameras and accessories 


2,308.24 


Billiards 




, 946.31 








Total 


30,480.34 


102,547.67 


219,583.54 






Guaranty for cigars 


28,267.25 
5,332.15 


38,220.56 
33,135.50 


7,507.21 


Stamps for leaf tobacco 


8,725.75 






Total 


33,699.40 


71,356.06 


16,232.96 






Total, Schedule D 


64,079.74 


173,903.73 


235,816.50 






Foreign coffee 






183.00 


Protection of coffee 




6,679.97 


7,808.39 








Total 




6,679.97 


7,991.39 








Fertilizer, guaranty stamps 






7,299.63 










Grand total 


2,144,875.64 


2,391,808.23 


2,959,358.91 







Exhibit No. 24. — Funds of the insular government June SO, 1920, 

Depositaries: 

American Colonial Bank, San Juan, P. R $1,876,106.27 

Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico, San Juna, P. R 318, 000. 00 

Banco Territorial y Agricola de Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R 388, 000. 00 

Credito y Ahorro Ponceno, Ponce, P. R 125, 000. 00 

The Mechanics & Metals National Bank of the City of New York, New- 
York, N. Y 1,485,490.39 

The Fletcher- American National Bank of Indianapolis, Ind 65, 366. 86 

The Royal Bank of Canada, San Juan, P. R 398,720.51 

Banco de Ponce, Ponce, P. R 50, 000. 00 

National City Bank of New York, San Juan, P. R 200, 000. 00 

Banco Masonico de Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R 10, 000. 00 

Total cash in depositaries 4, 916, 684. 03 

Less outstanding vouchers and pay checks drawn against funds in Ameri- 
can Colonial Bank 1,262,223.98 



Cash in transit to American Colonial Bank $689, 675. 55 

Draft in transit drawn on the Mechanics & Metals National 
Bank of New York 300,000.00 



3,654,460.05 



989,675.55 



Total available cash $4, 644, 135. ( 

Municipal bonds: 

Collateral to part of loan of $300,000, from the Mechanics & Metals National 

Bank 197,000.00 

Collateral to part of $1,122,000 refunding bonds sold 859, 000. 00 



School board bonds: 

Collateral to part of loan of $300,000 from the Mechanics & Metajs National 

Bank 108,000.00 

Collateral to part of $1,122,000 refunding bonds sold 269, 000. 00 

Unpledged ; 9, 000. 00 



1,056,000.00 



386,000.00 



Total balance (see Exhibit No. 22) 6, 086, 135. 60 

Due from municipalities on loans from insular revenues (see Exhibit No. 6). . . 74, 824. 75 
Due from school boards on loans from insular revenues (see Exhibit No. 7). . . 666. 66 

Duo from school boards on loans from school building fund (see Exhibit No. 8) 23, 876. 09 

• 99,367.50 

Grand total 6,185,503.10 



240 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



lExHiBiT No. 28. — Statement of cash receipts and disbursements during the year ending 

June 30, 1920. 



Insular 
revenues. 



Trust funds. 



Total. 



T3ash balance as of July 1, 1919 

Excess over legal, municipal, and school board maxima 

(Law No. 70 of 1916) 

United States internal revenues 

Customs 

Excise and property taxes for municipalities and school 

boards 

Industrial and commercial license taxes 

Property taxes, insular proportion 

Income tax 

Inheritance tax 

Proportion of municipal income for sanitation 

Court fines and fees 

Harbor and dock fees 

Telegraph and telephone receipts 

Interest 

Royalties on franchises 

Taxes on insurance premiums 

Rent of property 

Sale of Government propertv 

United States Government (Morrill-Hatch Act) 

Proceeds from sale of bonds 

Municipal and school board bonds redeemed 

Miscellaneous 

Bureau of supplies, printing and transportation, repay- 
ments 

Repayments of loans by municipalities: 

Cash 

Bonds 

Repayments of loans by school boards: 

Cash 

Bonds 

Other repayments 

Transfers 



$639,589.93 



$4,169,990.43 



249,235.76 
266,903.68 
300,000.00 

2,985,239.11 



2,952,916.28 



347,025.34 
2,468,573.03 
41,933.43 
46,683.46 
40,644.00 
26,474.30 
141, 830. 46 
180,991.53 
11,535.28 
68,233.65 
21,139.58 
6,259.37 



50,063.27 
40,959.07 



13,587.55 



234,900.00 
20,064.96 

1,246,744.47 

35,281.84 
52,500.00 

133.33 



30,000.00 
2 955,000.00 



2,813,907.56 



122,046.75 
583,090.35 



295,161.73 



Insular government receipts. 
Total 



9,524,166.91 



7,161,618.58 



10,353,552.84 



11,348,545.98 



DISBUBSEMENTS. 

Appropriations: 

1917-18 

1918-19 

1919-20 

No-fiscal year 

Indefinite 

Relief of municipalities (loans) 

Relief of school boards (loans) , 

Miscellaneous 

Municipal bonds redeemed 

School board bonds redeemed , 

Transfers 

Municipalities, tax account 

School Doard, tax account 

Insular bond redemption tax : 

Irrigation fund: 

Construction of auxiliary electrical plant 

Construction 

Maintenance and operation 

Development and extension of water power... 

Workman's relief trust fund 

Road bond fund of 1916 

Insular police relief fimd 

Construction of schoolhouses 

Capitol construction fund 

Magazine publishing fund 

Construction of rural school buildings 

Teachers' pension fund 

Funds for the protection of coflee 

General income of the insular experiment station . 

Outstanding liabilities 

U ni versit y fund 



11,527.48 

130,883.04 

6,499,249.68 

1,786,781.98 

320.277.09 

27,756.89 



107,500.00 
127,000.00 
295,161.73 



533,590.35 

2,314,060.42 

276,985.46 

102,144.51 

1,189.49 

42,609.01 

466,689.04 

25,928.03 

193,559.22 

566,408.19 

1, 131. 20 

4,922.35 

1,845.68 



1 Includes interest on irrigation fund and university of agricultural fund. 
* Includes proceeds sale of $1 ,000,000 public improvement funds of 1919. 



5,058.03 
1,806.11 
2,304.07 
7,459.70 
929.10 
69,555.26 



$8,022,216.56 



249,256,76 
295,809.00 
300,000.00 

5,938,184.39 



347,025.54 

2,459,375.63 

41,933.43 

46,683.45 

99,707.87 

65,423.37 

141,589.45 

163,949.30 

11,535.28 

68,285.03 

21, 159. 00 

6,259.37 

30,000.00 

983,000.00 

234,500.00 

2,834,023.81 

1, 246, 766. 67 

35,281.04 
52,500.00 

133.33 



162,046.75 
828,752.03 



16,888,702.46 



21,708,098.62 



11,527.48 

130,883.84 

6,499,249.68 

1,786,781.98 

320,277.09 

27,756.89 



107,500.00 
127,000.00 
828,752.08 
2,314,060.42 
276,985.46 
102,144.61 

1,189.49 

42,609.01 

466,689.04 

23,928.03 

193,559.22 

566,408.19 

1,131.20 

4,922.35 

1,845.68 



5,058.03 
1,806.11 
2,304.0? 
7, 469.70 
929.10 
59,565.25 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



241 



Exhibit No. 28. — Statement of cash receipts and disbursements during the year ending 
June 30, 1920— Qontm\xed. 



Insular 
revenues. 



Trust funds. 



Total. 



DISBURSEMENTS— continued. 



Permanent university fund 

University agricultural fund 

University incMne fund 

Special fund, food commission 

Cash bond deposits 

Construction of harbor improvements at San Juan. 

San Juan Harbor fund 

Wharf and harbor fund 

Municipal bond fund 

School-board bond funds 

Redemption of municipal bonds 

Redemption of schoolboard bonds 

Unclaimed wages 

Miscellaneous 



150,509.98 



394,80 

9,277,92 

29,226.72 

24,000.00 

20,888.25 

65,314.72 

20,182.50 

69,500.00 

62,500.00 

1,194.16 

1,356,640.28 



Insular Government disbursements.. 
Balance as of June 30, 1920 



$9,306,138.69 
1,056,414.15 



6,315,824.53 
5,029,721.45 



Grand total., 



10,362,552.84 



1,345,545.98 



150,509.98 



394.80 

9,277.92 

29,226.72 

24,000.00 

20,888.25 

65,314.72 

20,182.50 

69,500.00 

62,500.00 

1,194.16 

1,356.640.28 



15,621,963.22 
6,086,135.60 



21,708,098.82 



Exhibit No. 26. — ^^ RepaymenV receipts, detailed, fiscal year ending June SO, 1919, 

Repayments to Bureau of supplies, printing, and transportation: 

By various departments- from msular revenues appropriations |I, 061, 397. 46 

By various departments from trust funds, by municipalities, school 

boards, and other sources 112, 825. 21 

By special disbursing oflftcers 72, 521. 80 

II, 246, 744. 47 

Payments by municipalities on account of loans 87, 781. 84 

Payments by school boards on account of loans 133. 33 

Payments by pay patients, insane asvlum ^ 16, 477. 27 

Amounts repaid by department of the interior for payments received from municipalities 

and school boards for services rendered 28, 548. 28 

Amounts repaid by department of insular police for payments received from sale of uniforms 

and other eq^uipment 15, 200. 25 

Amounts repaid by department of education for payments received from sale of equipment. . 17, 146. 99 
Amounts repaid by departments to various appropriations 105, 473. 96 

Total 1,517,506. 3» 



242 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 






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REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



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277 



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278 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF POBTO RI<30. 




CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 279 

Exhibit No. 32. — Estimated insular revenue cash income^ appropriation assets ^ and 
appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30^ 1921. 

ESTIMATED CASH INCOME AND APPROPRIATION ASSETS. 

Treasurer's estimate of cash income: 

Customs $300,000.00 

Excise taxes 2, 650, 000. 00 

Property taxes 375, 000. 00 

Income tax 2, 500, 000. 00 

Inheritance tax 40, 000. 00 

United States internal revenues 1,000,000.00 

Interest on bank deposits 100,000.00 

Court fees and fines 40, 000. 00 

Harbor and dock fees 20, 000. 00 

Telegraph and telephone receipts 140, 000. 00 

Interest on loans to municipalities and school boards 70, 000. 00 

Miscellaneous income : 120, 000.00 

Deferred revenues 1, 660, 000. 00 

Total 9,015,000.00 

Less reserve for income billed 12, 559. 68 

$9,002,440.32 

Appropriation assets at July 1, 1920: 

Loans to Irrigation Service i 50, 000. 00 

Ivoans to municipalities and school boards i $76, 491. 41 

Less reserve for municipal loan account 1, 000. 00 

75,491.41 

Cash available for insular expenditures with: 

Depositaries 1, 056, 414. 15 

Disbursing officers 1, 000. 00 

Excess of securities hypothecated i 6, 500. 00 

1,063,914.15 

Bills for collection: 

Repayable to appropriations 11, 764. 22 

Income billed 12, 559. 68 

24,323.90 

1,213,729.46 

10,216,169.78 
AFPROPEUTIONS. 

Appropriation balances at July 1, 1920: 

Fiscal year 1920-21 8, 079, 252. 15 

Fiscal year 1919-20— 

Unexpended balance $577, 062. 11 

Bills for collection 1, 246. 65 

578, 308^ 76 

Fiscal year 1918-19— 

Unexpended balance 215, 127. 00 

Bills for collection 16. 08 

215,143.08 

. No fiscal year: 

Unexpended balance 895, 877. 97 

Bills for collection 10,501.49 

Disbursing officers 1, 000. 00 

907,379.46 

Estimated nonreimbursable indefinite appropriation 30, 000. 00 

9,810,083.45 

Estimated surplus, June 30, 1921 406, 086. 33 

10,216,169.78 
» See June report. 



280 



REPOBT OF THE GOVEENOR OF PORTO RICO. 






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285 



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286 



BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RIGO. 



Exhibit No. 36. — Total cash receipts and expenditures, bureau of insular^ telegraph, 
for the year ending June 30, 1920. 



TELEGRAPH. 



Month. 



July 

August 

September. 

October 

November, , 
December . . 
January — 
February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Number 

of paid 

messages. 



24,881 
25,237 
25,734 
27,606 
26,927 
33,871 
28; 823 
24,806 
25, 152 
25,360 
24,948 
26,415 



Earnings. 



799.09 
970.32 
237. 10 
086.97 
579. 77 
490.72 
445.45 
116. 59 
198. 77 
265. 06 
326. 23 
483.93 



Mainte- 
nance and 
operation. 



10 



667. 75 
095.91 
649.53 
438. 37 
244.97 
962.26 
810. 24 
022. 98 
642.18 
663.06 
435.93 
486.60 



319,760 104,000.00 84,119.78 21,882.89 2,002.67 



Profits. 



$2,131.34 

874.41 

4, 587. 57 

1, 648. 60 

1,334.80 

528.46 

5, 635. 21 

1,093.61 

1.556.59 

602. 00 

1,890.30 



Losses. 



$2, 002. 67 



TELEPHONE. 



Month. 



Number 

of paid 

messages. 



Tolls. 



Rentals. 



Total. 



Mainte- 
nance and 
operation. 



Profits. 



Losses. 



July 

August 

September. 
October . . . 
November. 
December. 
January . . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



9,161 
9.818 
8,914 
7,928 
8,136 
9,162 
8,642 
7,556 
9,741 
8,900 
10,018 
14,954 



112,930 



$1, 263. 53 
2,385.91 
2, 139. 81 
2,091.58 
2,166.44 
2, 182. 88 
2, 195. 63 
2,053.60 
2,250.35 
2, 241. 02 
2,154.84 
2, 744. 21 



$898. 88 

902.88 

907.38 

937.54 

949.54 

966.54 

979. 69 

991.04 

995.04 

1,043.04 

1,057.04 

1,062.04 



$2, 162. 41 
3,288.79 
3, 047. 19 
3,029.12 
3,115.98 
3, 149. 42 
3, 175. 32 
3,044.64 
3, 245. 39 
3, 284. 06 
3,211.88 
3, 806. 25 



$2,833.88 
3, 547. 95 
1, 824. 77 
3,719.18 
3,622.49 
5 481. 13 
1, 905. 12 
3,511.49 
3, 321. 08 
3. 831. 54 
3; 217. 96 
5,243.30 



$1,222.42 



1,270.20 



25,869.80 



11,690.65 37,560.45 



42,059.89 2.492.62 



$671. 47 
259. 16 



690. 06 

506. 51 

2,331.71 



466. 85 

75.69 

547.48 

6.08 

1,437.05 



6,992.06 



COMBINED. 



Month. 



Number 
of paid 



Total 
number of 
messages. 



Earnings. 



Mainte- 
nance and 
operation. 



Losses. 



Deficit 

and 
surplus. 



July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . . 

January 

February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



492 

359 

433 

805 

412 

515 

778 

1,526 

1,033 

1,341 

1,425 

1,423 



10,542 



34,534 
35,414 
35,081 
36.339 
35,475 
43,548 
38.243 
33,888 
35,926 
35.601 
36,391 
42, 792 



$9, 961. 50 
11,259.11 
11,284.29 
12, 116. 09 
11,695.75 
14, 640. 14 
12,620.77 
11,16L23 
11,444.16 
11,549.12 
11, 538. 11 
12,290.18 



$8, 501. 63 
10,643.86 

5,474.30 
11, 157. 55 
10,867.46 
16,443.39 

5,715.36 
10, 534. 47 

9,963.26 
11,494.60 

9, 653. 89 
15, 729. 90 



$2, 131. 34 

874. 41 

5, 809. 99 

1. 648. 60 
1, 334. 80 

528.46 
6,905.41 

1. 093. 61 
1,556.59 

602.00 
1,890.30 



$671. 47 
259. 16 



690. 06 

506.51 

2,331.71 



466.85 

75. 69 

547.48 

6.08 

3,439.72 



443,232 



141, 560. 45 



126, 179. 67 



24,375.51 



8, 994. 73 



$1,459.87 

615. 25 

5, 809. 99 

958. 4 

828. 29 

1,803.25 

6,905.41 

626. 76 

1,480.90 

54.52 

1,884.22 

3, 439. 72 



15, 380. 78 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



287 



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CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAIi EXHIBITS. 



289 



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8,064.37 

1,123.66 










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699.36 

1,019.29 

8,064.37 

1,123.66 








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290 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 38. — Porto Rico irrigation service — Financial statement June 30 y 1920. 

ASSETS. 
Investment accounts: 

Construction expenditures $4, 167, 702. 93 

Construction equipment $56,835. 94 

Less depreciation charged off 32, 249. 75 

24,586.19 

Supplies construction 47, 909. 19 

Total value equipment and supplies onhand 72,495.38 

4,240,198.31 
Less items in suspense 488. 11 

Total expenditures on constniction to date 4, 239,710. 20 

Interest on bonds to June 30, 1920 1,897,226.72 

Literest payable on temporary loan, insular government 5,996. 64 

Discount on bonds 48, 260. 50 

Depreciation reserve, irrigation system 422. 19 

Depreciation reserve, hydroelectric system 1. 50 

Bond amortization 225, 000. 00 

Operation during construction: 

Eastern division 5, 886. 38 

Western division 9,939. 28 

15,825.66 

Plant: 

Irrigation system— 

Guamani Canal 1, 129. 72 

Juana Diaz Canal 1, 420. 39 

Pumping stations 1,231. 80 

Hydroelectric system- 
Power plant 1 , 047. 15 

Substations 4,940. 41 

Transmission lines 7, 483. 40 

Distribution lines 51 , 805. 82 

General headquarters— 

Guayama office 958. 84 

Juana Diaz office 889. 06 

Telephone lines 10. 85 

Corral 892.48 

Garage 2,340.82 

Construction division 3. 75 

74, 244. 49 

Maintenance repairs: 

Irrigation svstem— 

Patillas Reservoir 2, 861. 76 

CariteDam 3,598.62 

Melania Reservoir 137. 43 

Guamani Canal 18,972. 53 

Carite Tunnel 25. 95 

Patillas Canal 57,734. 52 

Coamo Reservoir 1, 119. 23 

Toro Negro diversion 18. 62 

Guayabal Reservoir 1, 654. 74 

Juana Diaz Canal 34,488. 49 

Hydroelectric system- 
Power plant 9,901. 46 

Substations 1, 230. 95 

Transmission lines 781.72 

Distribution lines 3, 021. 71 

General headquarters— 

Guayama office 1, 655. 64 

Juana Diaz office 1, 021. 55 

Telephone lines 15. 09 

138,240.01 

Maintenance improvements: 

Irrigation system — 

Patillas Dam 1,153.80 

Guamani Canal 12, 415. 19 

PatiUas Canal 17,708.76 

Coamo Reservoir 924. 53 

Guayabal Reservoir 160. 87 

Juana Diaz Canal 7, 407. 91 

Hydroelectric system— 

Power plant , . . . 1, 437. 16 

Substations 175.05 

Transmission lines 117. 85 

Distribution lines 87. 25 

General headquarters— 

Guayama office 112. 62 

Juana Diaz office 866. 69 

Garage 937 . 87 

43, 505. 56 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 291 

Operation: 

Irrigation system— • 

Eastern Division $100, 242. 75 

Western Division 51, 523. 24 

$152, 765. 99 

Hydroelectric system- 
Power plant 54,872. 83 

Substations 11, 189. 86 

Transmission lines 5, 254. 14 • 

Distribution lines 5, 113. 59 

76,430,42 

General headquarters 34,774. 00 

. Administration 150, 760. 26 

Stores 28,252.09 

Total expenditures $7, 131, 416. 22 

Working accounts: 

Cash in hand of treasurer, San Juan 129, 704. 55 

Accounts collectible 18, 318. 75 

Tax levy $362, 231. 59 

Less taxes collected 360, 920. 53 

1,311.06 

149,334.36 

Less: 

Voucher payable 6, 232. 85 

Unpaid labor 135. 05 

Accrued expenses 699. 54 

1 — 7,067.44 

Total balances available for expenditures: 

Construction fund 20, 833. 24 

Construction of auxiliary electric plant 59, 295. 51 

Operation and maintenance fund 49, 808. 21 

Development and extension of water-power fund 12, 329. 96 

142,266.92 

7,273,683.14 

LIABILITIES. ' 
Investment accounts: 
Bond issue- 
Series of 1909 J $3, 000, 000. 00 

Series of 1913 1, 000, 000. 00 

Series of 1914 1, 100, 000. 00 

Series of 1915 400, 000. 00 

Series of 1916 200, 000. 00 

Series of 1918 117,000.00 

5,817,000.00 

Bonds paid— 

Jan. 1,1914 150,000.00 

Jan. 1,1915 150,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1916 150, 000. 00 

Jan. 1, 1917 150, 000. 00 

Jan. 1, 1918 150,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1919 150,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1920 150, 000. 00 

1,050,000.00 

4,767,000.00 

Premium on bonds 17,965. 46 

Interest on bank balance 233, 509. 04 

Receipt during construction: 

Eastern division 55, 887. 75 

Western division 34, 662. 20 

Irrig ation revenues 1, 564, 708. 35 

M w'cellaneous irrigation revenues 4,409.75 

Hydroelectric current revenues 314, 329. 94 

Miscellaneous hydroelectric current revenues 3, 388. 61 

Donation by M. Gonzalez and Martinez 2,821.20 

Treasury fund advanced 50, 000. 00 

Surplus irrigation system .84 

Invested surplus 225,000. 00 

• 2,506,683.14 

Total 7. 27'^, --> s\ 1 / 



292 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 39. — Porto Rico irrigation service — Statement of net charges to features 
during the fiscal year July J, 1919- June 30, 1920. 



Features. 



Construction: 

Patillas Dam 

Patillas Canal 

Patillas lateral, canals, and outlets 

Carite Dam 

Carite Tunnel 

Carite water power 

Guamani Canal 

Toro Negro diversion 

Guayabal Dam 

Juana Diaz laterals, canals, and outlets. 

General administration 

Juana Diaz Canal 

Melania Reservoir 

Hydrographic division 

Coiamo Dam 

Plant: 

Irrigation system— 

Guamani Canal 

Juana Diaz Canal 

Pumping stations 

■ Hydroelectric system — 

Power plant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

General headquarters— 

GuayaSna office 

Juana Diaz office 

Telephone lines 

Corral 



Garage 

Construction division. . 
Maintenance repairs: 
Irrigation system— 

Patillas Reservoir 

Carite Reservoir 

Melania Reservoir 

Guamani Canal 

Carite Tunnel 

Patillas Canal 

Coamo Reservoir 

Toro Negro Diversion.. 

Guayabal Reservoir. . . 

Juana Diaz Canal 

Hydroelectric system- 
Power x)lant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

General headquarters— 

Guayama office 

Juana Diaz office 

Telephone lines 

Maintenance improvements: 
Irrigation system— 

Patillas Dam 

Guamani Canal 

Patillas Canal 

Coamo Reservoir 

Guayabal Reservoir. . . 

Juana Diaz Canal 

Hydroelectric system- 
Power plant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

General headquarters— 

Guayama office 

Juana Diaz office 

Garage 

Operation: 

Irrigation system- 
Eastern division 

Western division 

Hydroelectric system- 
Power plant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 



Total 

to June 30, 

1919. 



Total July 1, 

1919, to 
June 30, 1920. 



1,127,023.12 
385,871.09 

27,655.48 
271,842.89 

60,853.19 
326, 293. 11 
112,415.91 
130,442.28 
642,053.99 

39,930.08 
338, 126. 56 
324,963.31 

43, 279. 17 

74,305.49 
295, 897. 15 



1,129.72 : 

1,345.06 I 

450.00 I 

681.89 I 
484.33 I 
3,645.89 
37,929.37 

512. 60 
292.99 

8.55 

1,002.33 

507.51 

3.75 



2, 105. 85 

3,598.62 

137. 43 

14,871.29 

25.95 

45,796.37 

1,109.21 

15.62 

1,497.48 

28,133.31 

7, 127. 44 
238.37 
713.37 

2,146.74 

457. 76 
271. 89 



1,059.70 
10,545.71 
17,708.76 
924.53 
160. 87 
5,937.81 

833.60 
175. 05 
117.85 
87.25 

112.62 
866. 69 
937.87 



81,977.27 
41,727.49 

41,275.79 
8,060.15 
3,834.77 
3,293.75 



S35, 467. 71 

8.57 



1 10. 80 



636.15 



13,000.00 



1 237. 83 
1,805.40 



75. 33 
781.80 

365. 26 
4,456.08 
3,837.51 
13,876.45 

446. 24 

596. 07 

2.30 

1 19. 85 

1,833.31 



755.91 




4,101.24 

4 


ii,938.i5 
10.02 



157.26 
6,355.18 

2,774.02 
992.58 
68.35 
874.97 

1,197.88 
749.66 
15.09 



1505.90 
1,869.48 



1,470.10 
603.56 



18,865.48 
10,195.75 

13,597.04 
3,129.71 
1,419.37 
1,310.84 



Total 

to June 30, 

1920. 



$1, 162, 490. 83 
385,879.66 

27,655.48 
271,832.09 

66,853.19 
326, 929.' 26 
112,415.91 
130,442.28 
639,003.99 

39,930.08 
337,888.73 
320,828.71 

43, 279. 17 

74,305.49 
293,975.33 



1,129.72 
1,420.39 
1,231.80 

1,047.15 
4,940.41 
7,483.40 
51,805.82 

958. 84 

889.06 

10.85 

982. 48 

2,340.82 

3.75 



2,861.76 

3,598.62 

137. 43 

18,972.53 

25.95 

57,734.52 

1,119.23 

18.62 

1,654.74 

34,488.49 

9,901.46 

1,230.95 

781.72 

3,021.71 



1,655.64 

1,021.85 

15.09 



1, 153. 80 
12,415.19 
17,708.76 
924.53 
160. 87 
7,407.91 

1,437.16 
175.05 
117.85 
87.25 

112.62 
866. 69 
937. 87 



100,842.75 
51,923.24 

54,872.83 
11,189.86 
5,254.14 
6, 113. 80 



CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL EXHIBITS. 



293 



Exhibit No. 39. — Porto Rico irrigation service— Statement of net charges to features 
during the fiscal year July 1^ 19 19- June 30, i9^0— Continued. 



Features. 



Operation— Continued. 

General headquarters- 
Telephone lines 

Corral 

Garage 

Construction division 

Administration — General headquarters: 

Executive division 

Engineering division 

Accounting division 

Property division 

Total 



Total 

to June 30, 

1919. 



$G, 207. 30 
6,087.75 
2,073.34 

20,355.45 

91,229.61 
20, 866. 01 
9, 583. 29 
4,095.80 



4, 744, 532. 59 



Total July 1, 

1919, to 
June 30, 1920. 



460. 11 
087. 75 
673. 34 

751. 14 

056. 15 
098. 68 
090. 45 
735. 27 



165, 898. 33 



Total 

to June 30, 

1920. 



$7,667.41 



27, 106. 59 

112,284.76 
22,964.69 
10,679.74 
4,831.07 



4,910,430.92 



1 Credit balances. 

Exhibit No. 40. — Porto Rico irrigation service — General balance sheet — Summary 
of accounts to June 30, 1920. 



Debits. 



Credits. 



Construction: 

Patillas Dam 

Patillas Canal 

Patillas lateral canals and outlets 

Carite Dam 

Carite Tunnel 

Carite Water Power , 

Guanmani Canals". 

Toro Negro diversion 

Guayabal Dam 

Juana Diaz lateral canals and outlets 

General administration 

Juana Diaz Canals 

Melania Reservoir 

Hydrographic division 

Coamo Dam 

Premium on bonds 

Interest on bonds 

Interest on bank balances 

Treasurer, San Juan 

Treasurer, San Juan, construction of auxiliary electric plant. 

Vouchers payable 

Treasurer, accounts collectible 

Accrued expenses 

Operation during construction- 
Eastern division 

Western division 

Receipts from operation during construction- 
Eastern division 

Western division : 

Discoimt on bonds .- - 

Interest payable on temporary loan, insular government .... 
Operation: 

Irrigation system— 

Guamani Canal 

Juana Diaz Canal 

Pumping- stations 

Hydroelectric system — 

Power plant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

General headquarters— 

Guayama office 

Juana Diaz office 

Telephone lines 

Corral 

Garage 

Construction division 



$1,162,490.83 
385,879.66 

27,655.48 
271,832.09 

66,853.19 
326,929.26 
112,415.91 
130,442.28 
639,003.99 

39,930.08 
337,888.73 
326,828.71 

43,279.17 

74,305.49 
293,975.33 



901,777.78 



20,837.24 
59,345.76 



100.56 



5,886.38 
9,939.28 



38,612.50 
955.55 



1,129.72 
1,420.39 
1,231.80 

1,047.15 
4,940.41 
7,483.40 
51,805.82 

958. 84 

889.06 

10.85 

982.48 

2,340.82 

3.75 



$8,559.50 



219,484.78 



146.71 

'"s'io 



55,887.75 
34,662.20 



294 



REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Exhibit No. 40. — Porto Rico irrigation service — General balance sheet — Summary 
of accounts to June 30, 1920 — Continued. 



Debits. 



Credits. 



Maintenance repairs: 
Irrigation system— 

Patillas Reservoir 

Carite Reservoir , 

Melania Reservoir 

Guamani Canal 

Carite Tunnel 

Patillas Canal 

Coamo Reservoir 

Toro Negro diversion >. . . 

Guayabal Reservoir 

Juana Diaz Canal 

Hydroelectric system — 

Power plant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

Genpral head nil art ers— 

Guayama office 

Tiiara Diaz office 

Telephone lines 

Maintenance improvements: 
Irrigation system— 

Patillas Dam 

G uamani Canal 

Patillas Canal 

Coamo Reservoir 

Guayabal Reservoir 

Juana Diaz Canal 

Hydroelectric system — 

Power plant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

General headquarters— 

Gnayama office 

Juaria Diaz office 

Garage 

Operation: 

Irrisration system- 
Eastern division 

Western division 

Hydroelectric system- 
Power plant 

Substations 

Transmission lines 

Distribution lines 

General headquarters— 

Telephone lines 

Construction division 

Administration, general headquarters: 

Executive division 

Engineering division 

Accounting division 

Property division 

Tax levy 

Treasurj" 

Treasury, development and extension of water power. 

Accounts receivable 

Stores. 



Stores^ Carite water power 

Unpaid labor 

Accounts payable 

Accrued expenses 

Bonded debt 

Invested surplus 

Depreciation reserve, irrigation system 

Depreciation reserve, hydroelectric system . 

Surplus, irrigation system 

Treasury funds advanced 

Irrigation revenue 

Miscellaneous, irrigation revenue 

Hydroelectric current revenue 

Miscellaneous hydroelectric revenue 

Interest on daily bank balances 

Donation br M. Gonzalez and Martinez 

Bond amortization 

Interest on bonds 

Other interest 

Discount on bonds 

Premium on V)onds 



Total.. 



18, 



,861.76 
,598.62 
137.43 
,972.53 

25.95 
,734.52 
, 119. 23 

18.62 
,654.74 
488.49 

901.46 
230.95 
781.72 
021.71 

655. 64 

021.95 

15. 00 



. 153. 80 
>, 41.5. 19 
' , 708. 76 
924. 53 
160. S7 
\407.9] 

,437.16 
175.05 
117.85 

87. 25 

112.62 
S66. 69 
937. 87 



100, 
51, 



112, 
22, 
10, 
4, 
1, 
35, 
14, 
18. 



842. 75 
923.24 

, 872. 83 
, ISO. 86 
, 254. 14 
,113.59 

,667.41 
, 106. 59 

284. 76 
964. 69 
679. 74 
831.07 
311.06 
460.17 
061.. 38 
218.19 
872.31 
379. 78 



122. 10 
1..50 



225, 
995 



000.00 
448.94 
041.09 
6i8. 00 



7, 280, 750. 58. 



$135. 05 

6, 086. 14 

691.44 

4, 767, 000. 00 

225, 000. 00 



.84 
50, 000. 00 
1,564,708.-35 
4, 409. 75 
314,329.94 
3,388,61 
14,024.26 
2, 821. 20 



9,405.96 



7, L'.SO. 750. 58 



Appendix V. 
REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

Department of Finance, 

Office of the Treasurer, 
San Juan, P. R., August 18, 1920, 
The Governor of Porto Rico, 

San Juan, Porto Rico. 
Sir: In compliance with your request of July 12, 1920, I have the honor to submit 
here^\ith the following report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, covering the 
activities of the Department of Finance. 

general remarks. 

The conditions of this department during the fiscal year which expired June 30, 
1920, have been quite normal. The estimated income for the fiscal year amounted 
to $7,121,347, and the total collections aggregated $7,238,570.17. 

The receipts from excise taxes were estimated at $3,426,000, which sum included 
$1,025,000 of estimated collections from United States internal revenue taxes assessed 
on goods shipped from Porto Rico into the United States. The actual revenue col- 
lected from this source by the United States deputy collector of internal revenue 
in this island amounted to $1,660,215.91, which sum has not as yet been deposited 
to the credit of the treasurer of Porto Rico, hence all expenditures of the insular 
government during the fiscal year had to be met out of revenues accruing from other 
sources and the cash balance available at the close of the preceding year. 

The delay in receiving the United States internal revenues in due time, as pointed 
out, created a feeling of uneasiness in the department, by reason of the impending 
menace of a shortage of funds; fortunately, as actual collections from other sources 
of revenue exceeded the total amount estimated, we were able to carry on our activities 
unhindered. The difficulties under which we have labored in the past, brought 
about by the delay in receiving the proceeds of United States internal revenue col- 
lections, will be solved by the recent decision of the Comptroller of the Treasury 
of the United States, directing that such revenues be turned over directly by the 
deputy collector of internal revenue of the United States to the treasurer of Porto 
Rico. 

The operations of the fiscal year 1919-20 have been closed with a surplus of 
$1,056,414.15 of insular revenues, this being the largest available cash balance ob- 
tained in any fiscal year since 1914-15. The next larger balance at the close of any 
fiscal year after 1914-15 was that for 1918-19, amounting to $838,385.93. 

Due to the high cost of living, the legislature at its last special session increased 
the salaries of all the employees of The People of Porto Rico, which measure will 
involve a total outlay of about $1,200,000. The legislature did not provide for addi- 
tional revenues to meet this expenditure, relying upon the admitted fact that there 
was available in the hands of the Treasurer of the United States a considerable sum 
of money from United States internal revenue collections, which was forthcoming. 

Attention has been called in two previous reports to the fact that the Legislative 
Assembly of Porto Rico had been for many years enacting laws for the construction 
of public w^orks, and for other purposes, and making no fiscal year appropriations 
therefor. As all such appropriations constituted obligations against the treasury and 
the regular receipts have not been sufficient to meet them, the accounts of the govern- 
ment have been for that reason showing an annual deficit in the public treasury. 
This matter was taken up at different times by the legislature, without arriving at 
any practical conclusion; however, during the last special session, and upon the 
recommendation of the acting governor, a joint resolution was approved, staying 
the execution of all public works theretofore authorized by the Legislative Assembly 
of Porto Rico, and for which no fiscal year appropriations had been made. For the 
purpose of carrying out said public works a trust fund was created under the designa- 
tion of "Trust fund for the construction of public works." One of the great advan- 
tages to be derived from this resolution is that all public works decided upon by the 
legislature will be carried out within no prescribed limit of time, and out of such 
funds, as may from year to year accumulate in said trust fund, and further, that the 
legislature will be at liberty to enact new laws creating appropriations for other 
essential purposes of the administration, and the provisions of section 34 of the arganic 
act will not be an obstacle thereto. 

295 



296 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO, 

NeiD legislation. — Due to the new legislation on income tax and excise taxes, several 
lawsuits were filed against the treasurer of Porto Rico in the course of the present 
fiscal year. This situation quite embarrassed the work of the department, as the 
legal questions involved required thorough study, so that adequate rulings could 
be made governing the points in controversy, tlnfortunately, in some instances, 
the law was so specific that no other construction than its own wording could be 
placed, and this rendered the situation more complex. Finally, the legislature at 
its last special session in May, 1920, through adequate legislation corrected the defi- 
ciencies noted in certain sections of the income tax and excise tax laws, thereby 
affording the relief sought for, in a way which will evince its good results in the work 
of the ensuing fiscal year. 

There was also another important law enacted in connection with taxes paid under 
protest. This new law provides that taxes paid under protest should be covered into 
the insular treasury in the same manner as if no protest had been made, and further, 
outlines the method of procedure by the complainants, by the collecting officers, 
and by the courts of justice in disposing of such claims. 

The recommendation made by the undersigned in his last annual report dwelling 
upon the inanifold duties imposed upon the treasurer of Porto Rico, outside of the 
official business of the department of finance, was embodied in the message of the 
Acting Governor of Porto Rico to the legislature, which caused the enactment of a law 
withdrawing the treasurer of Porto Rico as a member of the workmen relief commis- 
sion, to the advantage of both the commission and the treasury department. 

The act establishing a system of local government and reorganizing municipal 
services, approved July 31,*^ 1919, was also the subject of amendments, the details 
whereof are dealt with under the proper heading. 

Several other laws were enacted by the Legislature of Porto Rico, during the fiscal 
year under review, more or less related to this department, all of which laws have been 
very fruitful for the general conduct of the Government affairs. 

Personnel. — There occurred an important change in the personnel of this department 
during the past fiscal year. Upon the resignation of Mr. Luis Venegas Castro, as 
assistant treasurer of Porto Rico, to accept a more remunerative position with a local 
banking institution, Mr. Emilio M. Vassallo, formerly the executive secretary of the 
Porto Rico Food Commission, was appointed to fill the vacancy on August 1, 1919. 

During the protracted absence from office of the treasurer of Porto Rico, owing to 
his designation as acting governor of the island, Mr. Vassallo was appointed acting 
treasurer of Porto Rico, in which capacity he has served for the past seven months, 
with the greatest ability and efficiency. 

Earthquakes. — ^Mortgage loans: Under section 4, of act No. 80, of the Legislature of 
Porto Rico, approved December 12, 1918, the sum of $200,000 was appropriated for 
making mortgage loans to persons whose houses, in consequence of the recent earth- 
quakes had suffered damages of such import as to make them uninhabitable and whose 
owners had absolutely no means for the repair or reconstruction thereof. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions referred to, as well as other features 
of the law, a board was created consisting of the Governor of Porto Rico, the treasurer 
of Porto Rico and the commissioner of the interior. 

At a meeting of the board held on March 24, 1920, all the applications for mortgage 
loans, theretofore filed, were passed upon, with the following result: 

Thirty-two petitions were approved, the applicants having fulfilled the require- 
ments of the law. 

Twenty-six were denied on the ground that the properties affected were subject to 
previous liens, wherefore a first mortgage could not be laid in favor of The People of 
Porto Rico. Out of this number, one was subsequently granted, the petitioner having 
shown that he had lifted the encumbrance. 

Fourteen other petitions were denied because the properties did not appear recorded 
in the registry of property, thus rendering impossible to record a first mortgage in favor 
of The People of Porto Rico, as required by the law; three others, because the prop- 
erties did not appear recorded in favor of the petitioners. 

Another ground for denial which disposed of six applications was that the properties 
offered as security did not answer for the amounts of the loans requested. Finally, 
two petitions filed by the same party were denied because the board had knowledge 
that this petitioner owned other properties and could afiford to undertake the repairs 
out of his own pocket. 

After the meeting of March 24, 1920, when the board met for the purpose just noted, 
other meetings have been held, for the approval of deeds and documents submitted 
in connection with each loan. 

The treasurer of Porto Rico, drafted a special set of conditions to be inserted in the 
mortgage deeds, besides the general conditions governing mortgage contracts. 



KEPORT OF THE TREASURER. 297 

All of the loans granted bear interest at the rate of 4 per cent per annum, and the 
principal is reimbursable in 10 yearly installments. 

Up to June 30, 1920, the amount of $16,950 has been paid out on account of mortgage 
loans. 

Earthquake donations. — The relief work under this heading has been in charge of the 
commissioner of the interior, who is also a member of the earthquake board, and un- 
doubtedly will be the subject of comment in his report for the present fiscal year. 

BUREAU OF ACCOUNTS AND OF THE PAYMASTER. 

Financial condition of the insular treasury for the fiscal year 1919-20. — The gross receipts 
during the year amounted to $9,524,166.91, and the gross expenditures aggregated 
$9,306,138.69 — that is to say, an excess of the receipts over the expenditures amounting 
to $218,028.22. Adding to this sum the balance of $838,385.93 m the treasury, there 
was available at the close of business on June 30, 1920, a total balance of $1,056,414.15, 
as shown in Exhibit No. 22. 

There is a considerable amount of revenue accrued during the year, which had not 
been deposited prior to June 30, 1920. This is represented by the following items: 

The sum of $74,824.75, due by municipalities, and $666.66 due by school boards. 

The sum of $24,323.90, due from leases of public lands and other sources. 

The sum of $50,000, advanced to the ''Irrigation fund, trust fund," which will be 
reimbursed to the insular treasury out of irrigation revenues for the year 1920-21. 

The amount of $1,660,215.91, from taxes collected in the United States on articles 
produced or manufactured in the island and shipped to the United States. 

These various items of revenue which might be called "deferred and in transit'' 
make a total of $1,810,031.22. 

The total amount of cash available and revenues in transit at the close of business 
on June 30, 1920, is therefore, $2,866,445.37. 

In addition to the balance of $1,056,414.15 from the insular revenues above recited, 
there is a balance in trust funds of $5,029,721.45 for specific purposes, making up a 
total of $6,086,135.60 in the insular treasury, distributed as follows: 

Insular revenues: 

Cash / $1,047,414.15 

Bonds unpledged 9,000.00 

$1,056,414.15 

Trust funds: 

Cash 3,000,721.45 

Bonds pledged 1,429.000.00 

5,029,721.45 

Total 6,086,135.60 

The amount of bonds pledged is distributed as follows: 

Deposited in the American Colonial Bank of Porto Rico, as collateral security 

loan of $300,000, made by the Mechanics and Metals National Bank of New 

York, to The People of Porto Rice: 

Municipal bonds 103, 000. 00 

School board bonds 108,000.00 

301,000.00 

Held in trust and deposited in safety deposit vault of the Royal Bank of 

Canada, as collateral security $1,122,000 refunding bonds: 

Municipal bonds 859,000.00 

School board bonds 269,000.00 

1,128,000.00 

Total 1,429,000.00 

Exhibit No, 31, under the heading ''Disbursements," shows a distribution of the 
trust funds on hand at the close of the fiscal year. 

Estimated financial condition of the insular treasury for the fiscal year 1920-^1. — 
A conservative estimate of the insular revenues for the year 1920-21 is given in the 
following statement (see also Table No. 1, of this report): 

Customs * $300, 000. 00 

United states Internal revenues 1,000,000.00 

Property taxes 375,000.00 

Income taxes 2,500,000.00 

Excise taxes 2, 650, 000. 00 

Inheritance taxes 40, 000. 00 

Interest on loans to municipalities and school boards 70, 000. 00 

Interest on bank deposits 100, 000. 00 

Telegraph and telephone receipts 140, 000. 00 

Court fees and fines 40,000.00 

Harbor and dock fees 20, 000. 00 

Miscellaneous income 120, 000. 00 

Deferred revenues 1, 660, 000. 00 

9,015,000.00 



298 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



The total assets and liabilities for the fiscal year 1920-21 are as follows: 

ASSETS. 

Cash on hand, insular revenues, June 30, 1920 $1, 047. 414. 15 

Unpledged bonds 9, 000. 00 

Miscellaneous deferred revenues not taken up in Table No. 1 131 . 991 . 41 

Estimated income for 1919-20 9, 015, 000. 00 

$10,203,405.56 

LIABILITIES. 

Unexpended balances of fiscal vear 1918-19 215, 127. 00 

Fiscal vear 1919-20 ' 577, 062. 11 

Budi^etary appropriation, fiscal year 1920-21 8. 079, 252. 15 

No-flscal-year appropriations 895, 877. 97 

Estimated amount, required lor indefinite appropriations 30, 000. 00 

9.797,319.23 . 

Estimated surplus June 30, 1921 106. 086. 33 

The foregoing figures show that at the close of operations for the fiscal year 1920-21 
there will be a cash surplus in the treasury amounting to $406,086.33, provided that 
the different sources of revenue return the estimated income. 

Various sources of revenue. — The estimated income for the year 1920, the revenue 
actually collected during said year, and the estimated income for the fiscal year 
1920-21 are set forth in detail in the followdng statement: 



Sources. 



Customs 

United States internal revenues 

Property taxes '. 

Income taxes 

Excise taxes 

Inheritance taxes 

Interest on loans to municipalities and school boards.. 

Interest on bank deposits 

Telegraph and telephone receipts 

Court fees and fines 

Harbor and dock fees 

Miscellaneous income 

Sanitation, 6 per cent 

Deferred revenues 



Total 7,121,347.00 



Estimate 
for 1919-20. 



$370,000.00 

1, 025, 000. 00 

295,347.00 

2, 625, 000. 00 

2,401,000.00 

45,000.00 

80 000. 00 

70, 000. 00 

100,000.00 

30,000.00 

20,000.00 

60,000.00 



Actual collec- 
tions during 
1920. 



$300, 

286, 

596, 

2,458, 

2, 985, 

41, 

73, 

107, 

141 

49 

24, 

127, 

46 



000. 00 
.503. 53 
281.30 
575. 63 
239.11 
933. 43 
250. 91 
140. 62 
560. 45 
644. 60 
474.30 
282.84 
683. 45 



7,238,570.17 



Estimate 
for 1920-21. 



$300, 000. 00 

1,000,000.00 

375, 000. 00 

2,500,000.00 

2, 650, 000. 00 

40,000.00 

70,000.00 

100, 000. 00 

140,000.00 

40,000.00 

20,000,00 

120,000.00 

'i,*666,'666.'66 



9,015,000.00 



As shown in the preceding statement, the total collections during the fiscal year 
amounted to $7,238,570.17, or $117,223.17 in excess of the total estimated income, not- 
withstanding the fact that none of the United States internal-revenue collections, 
amounting to $1,660,215.91, had been covered into the insular treasury. The sum 
of $286,503.53, under the heading "Actual collections during 1920," corresponds to 
collections from previous years. The delay so far experienced in this respect will be 
avoided in the future as the United States deputy collector of internal revenues at 
San Juan has been instructed to deposit his collections with the local Government 
depository to the credit of the treasurer of Porto Rico, which measure will be very 
helpful to the department of finance. 

Further detailed data in connection with excise and inconxe taxes will be found 
under the captions ''Bureau of excise taxes" and "Bureau of income tax" elsewhere 
in this report. The various sources of revenue are also listed in Exhibit No. 30. 

Indebtedness of the insular government.— The total bonded indebtedness of the Gov- 
ernment of Porto Rico at the close of the fiscal year, as shown in Exhibit No. 14, 
amounts to $10,264,000, or $748,000 more than the preceding year. This difference is 
explained as follows : 

Bonds issued during the fiscal year: Public improvement bonds $1 , 000, 000 

Paid out during the fiscal vear: 

On accoimt road loan, 1907 $50,000 

On account irrigation loan, 1909 1.50,000 

On account refunding bonds, 1915 22,000 

On account refunding bonds, 1916 30,000 

252,000 

Diflference 748,000 

Ae above set forth, the total bonded indebtedness of the insular government has been 
increased during the year by the amount of $1,000,000, while it has been decreased by 
the amount of $252,000 by rea^^on of payments made; therefore the difference, $748,000, 
represents the actual increase ii the bonded indebtedness of The People of Porto Rico. 



BBPOBT OF THE TBEASURER. 299 

There is still a balance of $300,000 on a note due to the Mechanics & Metals National 
Bank of New York, which brings the total indebtednesss of The People of Porto Rico 
to the aggregate sum of $10,564,000. 

The sum of $240,000, pertaining to six temporary loans contracted with the local 
banks to provide funds lor the purpose of reconstructing the insular buildings and 
aiding the municipalities, school boards, and private persons in the reconstruction of 
buildings that were damaged or destroyed by the earthquakes of the year 1918 has 
been paid during the fiscal year under review. 

An examination of the figures appearing under the heading, ''Balance in sinking 
fund, June 30, 1920," Exhibit No. 14, shows that the necessary funds are now available 
for the redemption of the first bond issue, 1907, and the issue of 1910 for roads and 
bridges, and that the sum of $369,818.91 is alre'ady accumulated for the redemption 
of the issue of 1914. The accruals to the sinking fund from collections for 1920-21 
have been estimated in the sum of $275,000. 

Steps have already been taken leading toward the redemption of the bond issues 
of 1907 and 1910 for roads and bridges. 

The issue of $300,000 of high-school bonds was advertised by this department dur- 
ing the year, but due to the fact that the law authorizing the issuance of these bonds 
limited their sale at no less than par, no bids could be obtained, whereupon the de- 
partment decided to offer them for sale privately, together with $150,000 homestead 
bonds. The sale of these two bond issues had not been completed at the close of the 
fiscal year, although considerable progress had been made in that direction. 

Banking. — The accompanying Table No. 2 shows^ that the island has increased its 
banking acti^ities mth the opening of three new banks. These are the Banco de 
yabucoa, with a capital stock of $100,000; the Banco Agricola de Aguadilla, with a 
capital stock of $100,000; and the Banco de San Juan, with a capital stock of $50,000. 

An examination of the consolidated report of the banks in operation at the close of 
business on June 30, 1920, as compared with the report for the preceding year, shows 
the following differences: 

RESOURCES. 

On loans, an increase of $13, 532, 910. 81 

On bonds and stock investments, a decrease of 311, 832, 07 

On reserve cash funds in banks, an increase of 6, 036, 125. 60 

On balances with other banks, an increase of 4, 686, 383. 69 

On real estate, an increase of 84, 347. 86 

LIABILITIES. 

On capital stock paid in, an increase of 867, 113. 17 

On reserve funds, a decrease of 31, 191. 54 

On undivided profits, an increase of 487, 153. 32 

On individual and Government deposits, an increase of 18, 722,408. 19 

On balance due other banks, an increase of 3, 426, 023. 17 

On profit accounts, pending general balance, a decrease of 69, 404. 86 

On mortgage bonds issued, an increase of 306^ 700. 00 

The financial condition of the banks in Porto Rico is highly satisfactory, and it is 
to be hoped that a similar situation will prevail during the ensuing fiscal year. 

The extension to Porto Rico of the rural credits act has been the subject of com- 
ment in previcus reports, and we repeat again that the benefits to be derived thereby 
are of such import that no effort should be spared by the insular authorities toward 
its attainment. 

lufiurance. — The past calendar year 1919 and the first six months of the j)resent 
year have been conspicuous in the development of insurance business in this island, 
not only as regards the increased volume of business under each kind of insurance as 
'compared with the preceding year, but also because of the marked tendency on the 
part of companies lawfully authorized to do business in the country to widen their 
scope by writing insurance on a variety of risks, which, although authorized by their 
charters, had not been heretofore ventured on, or at least actively undertaken. 
Among these new activities, reference should be made to earthquake insur nee; the 
writing of policies against accidents by inland transportation in connection with 
motor vehicles; and other features of insurance appearing for the first time in the 
statistics of 1919. 

The purpose of this department in endeavoring to convince insurance agents of the 
benefits to be derived by extending in the island the business of their companies* 
was twofold: First, to afford the public a lawful, easy, and sure means of protection 
for their properties, thus narrowing the range of action of certain foreign corporations 
devoid of legal standing and guaranties in the country which had been doing unlawful 
business to the detriment of The People of Porto Rico, and of the companies which 
had registered in the island; and second, to secure to the treasury the collection of 
taxes upon those businesses. Both of these purposes have been accomplished, if not 
in their entirety, at least to a great extent. 

The effort of this department to induce agricultural insurance companies to estab- 
lish here have not been so fruitful. Most of the fire insurance companies registered 



300 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

in Porto Rico are legally authorized to insure plantations and crops against fire, 
lightning, cyclones, accidents on inland transportation, riots, etc., nevertheless, 
either through lack of experience in many of these features of insurance or for other 
reasons they very seldom issue policies on these risks; in any event, never to the 
extent assumed by companies engaged exclusively in agricultural insurance. There 
are companies which insure against loss or damage to plantations or crops, arising 
from the causes above recited, and also from diseases or insects, droughts, excessive 
rain, floods, and freshets, as well as against death or disability of live stock. 

Judging from the number of applications received in this department for permits 
to do business with foreign corporations of said character, it is manifest that the coun- 
try is in great need of a kind of insurance* such as will protect its main sources of 
wealth, and it is to be desired that agricultural insurance should establish in Porto 
Rico immediately. 

A comparison of the statistics of 1918 with those for 1919 will show a marked increase 
in all insurance activities. The increase obtained in the total amount of life insur- 
ance policies issued during 1919 represents in round figures 102 per cent over the same 
amount for the year 1918; next in order of importance come liability insurance and 
accident insurance, with an increase of 82 per cent; then marine insurance, with 65 
per cent; tornado insurance, with 40 per cent; fidelity insurance, with 10 per cent; 
and fire insurance, with 3 per cent. Policies were written also on earthquake insur- 
ance aggregating $2,860,851 and insurance on inland transportation amounting to 
$215,0(]S. Upon the aggregate of these policies the insurance companies have col- 
lected during 1919 $1,370,774.95 of premiums, on which amount there accrued to the 
insular treasury on account of the 3 per cent franchise tax and internal-revenue stamps 
the sum of $45,551.13. 

During the year 1919 three new corporations have established in the country: The 
Great American Insurance Co., of New York; the Insurance Co. of North America, 
of Pennsylvania; and the Reliance Marine Insurance Co., of Liverpool; and during 
the months elapsed of 1920 there have registered the London Assurance Corporation, 
of London; the Niagara Fire Insurance Co., of New York; and the Pan American 
Life Insurance Co. , of Louisiana. Besides the Royal Insurance Co. , which had already 
been authorized to issue policies on fire and marine insurance, has opened recently a 
new department on accidents, which has taken up for the present automobile insurance 
exclusively. 

Also there have been organized lately in this country two insurance companies, 
to wit, the Porto Rican & American Insurance Co. and the Porto Rican Lloyds, both 
in San Juan, with a capital stock of $250,000 each. The organization of these companies 
was authorized by virtue of an amendment introduced in 1912 to our law of private 
corporations, authorizing the incorporation of insurance companies in this island, and 
within the conditions which the executive council of Porto Rico in the exercise of its 
power as derived from said law considered that it had a right to prescribe. In this 
connection let it be said that this law is not as complete as it should be. 

In order to overcome this deficiency and in general to regulate the insurance busi- 
ness in Porto Rico, this department drafted a bill early in the year with the idea of 
submitting it to the legislatiu-e at its last special session, but owing to the limited 
period of time for which it had been convened and to other urgent legislation which 
demanded preference, oiu" purpose could not be accomplished. 

We propose to introduce this same bill at the next regular session of the legislature 
with such amendments as may be necessary to conform with the pro^essive trend of 
kindred legislation in the United States, and it is expected that it will go through. 

For further information in connection with insurance in Porto Rico, Table No. 3 
should be examined. 

BUREAU OF PROPERTY TAXES. 

Assessment. — The total assessed valuation for taxation purposes of all corporation 
and individual property, revised to June 30, 1920, aggregated $264,235,686. Of this 
total valuation the sum of $190,676,552 corresponds to individual property owners, 
on which taxes were levied amounting to $2,487,655.68; the balance represents the 
. assessed valuation of properties owned by corporations doing business in the island, 
on which there has been levied a tax of $1,002,196.36. 

This total assessed valuation shows an increase of $10,066,444 over the valuation 
revised to June 30, 1919, amounting to $254,169,242, or $167,804,692 more than the 
first general assessment of all real and personal property in Porto Rico, made during 
the fiscal year 1901-2, which amounted to $96,430,994 — that is to say, that the present 
assessment of all property in the island shows an increased valuation of approximately 
174 per cent as compared with the first general assessment of 1901-2. 

The result of the assessment, revised to December 31, 1919, is found in detail in 
the tables appended to this report, which are self-explanatory and show: 

(a) Total assessment value of real and personal property, by municipalities. Table No. 4. 



KBPOET OF THE TBBASUBEB. 



301 



(b) Tabulation of assessed value of real property, by municipalities and classes. 
Table No. 5. 

(c) Number of acres, by municipalities and classes. Table No. 6. 

(d) Average value per acre, by municipalities and classes. Table No. 7. 

(e) Total assessed value of personal property, by municipalities and classes, Table 
No. 8. 

(f) Number of head of live stock and vehicles and average value per unit, Table 
No. 9. 

All these tables are corrected to December 31, 1919. 

The total amount of taxes levied on individual property owners and corporations 
during the fiscal year 1919-20 aggregated 13,489,852.04, as shown in Exhibit No. 20, 
distributed as follows: 

Insular tax, two-tenths of 1 per cent in municipalities of the first class and one-tenth of 1 per 

cent in municipalities ot the second and third classes $354, 303. 08 

Municipal tax, eight-tenths of 1 per cent in municipalities of the first class and nine-tenths of 

1 per cent in other municipalities 2, 288, 177. 92 

School tax, at different rates not exceeding one-tenth of 1 per cent 261,124.14 

Insular bond redemption tax , one-tenth of 1 per cent 264, 029. 28 

Municipal bond redemption tax, at different rates, according to municipality 322, 217. 63 

3,489,852.04 

For the fiscal year 1918-19 property taxes were levied to the amoimt of $889,961.86 
for general expenditures, as against $354,303.08 for 1919-20 for the same purpose, thus 
showing a decrease of $535,658.78 compared with the preceding year. This decrease 
is due to the repeal of act No. 70, of the Legislature of Porto Rico, approved April 13, 
1916, which limited the apportionment of receipts from property taxes to mumcipali- 
ties to an amount equal to the collection made during the previous year, the balance 
to remain in the insular treasury for its use and benefit. 

Uncollected taxes. — Of the total amount of taxes assessed and levied for the fiscal 
year 1919-20, the sum of $3,461,252.75 Has been actually collected during the year, 
exclusive of surcharges, leaving a total amount of taxes pending collection on June 
30, 1920, of $28,599.29. 

The accumulation of taxes uncollected from the beginning of the present tax 
system, shows an amount of $38,112.74, thus making a grand total of $66,712.03 of 
uncollected taxes, as appear in Exhibit No. 19. This total is distributed as follows: 

Pending judicial adtlon $41, 584. 52 

Payments extended 8, 853. 82 

Probably uncollectible 15, 687. 23 

In claim's 586.46 

66.712.03 

The item ''pending judicial action, $41,584.52" includes $35,924.32 of property 
taxes owed by the American Railroad Co. of Porto Rico, which was the subject of 
litigation before the Federal court and is now on appeal before the Supreme Court 
of the United States. The balance is still in litigation before the insular courts. 

The amount of $8,853.82, appearing in Exhibit No. 19 as /'Payments extended," 
is now under summary proceedings for collection, and it is expected that most of it 
will be collected through the sale at public action of the properties involved. 

The amount of $15,687.23, "Probably uncollectible," represents taxes on personal 
property which has disappeared and whose owners are insolvent. 

The amount of $586.46, "In claims," is now under investigation by this oflBce. 

Inheritance taxes. — The total amount of inheritance taxes collected during the 
present fiscal year is less than the amount collected from the same source during 
the previous fiscal year, although the value of the estate of decedents in 1919-20 
exceeded that of 1918-19. This is easily explained by the fact that the inheritance 
tax rates are progressive, and further, because exemptions vary according to the 
number of heirs and other circumstances. 

The statement of inheritance taxes collected in 1919-20, as compared with 1918-19, 
is as follows: 





1918-19 


1919-20 


DifTerence, 
plus (-f-) or 
minus (-). 


Amount of tax-exempt inheritance 


$1,796,919.11 
1,913,945.29 


$1,512,447.98 
2,004,767.41 


-$284,471.13 


Inheritance liquidated 


- 90,822.12 






Total 


3,710,864.40 


3,517,215.39 


193,649.01 






Taxes collected 


42,004.82 
643.89 


31,891.00 
3,705.89 


- 10, 113. 82 


Taxes pending . . ... 


+ 3,062.00 






Total 


42,648.71 


35,596.89 


7,051.82 







14748—20 



302 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Sugar statistics. — One of the great drawbacks for purposes of comparison of statis- 
tical data, is the lack of complete statistics in the various departments of the insular 
government. A bureau should be created for the exclusive purpose of compiling all 
such data so that the same may be available for the use and information of all gov- 
ernment officials and the public at large. The department of finance has for some 
years devoted special attention to the compilation of sugar statistics, showing the 
number of mills in the Island, the owners thereof, and the quantity of sugar pro- 
duced each crop as compared with previous crops. 

As a matter of information such a statistic is appended hereto, as Table 
No. 20. 

BUREAU OP INCOME TAX. 

As stated under the caption of "General remarks," act No. 80, of June 26, 1919, 
gave rise to many controversies which, indeed, hindered and delayed the collection 
of income taxes for the first three months of the fiscal year. 

The sudden change from the old to the new legislation on the subject, with increased 
rates of taxation, created a tendency on the part of taxpayers to scrutinize the law 
with a view to escaping the payment of large sums of money for taxes on income. 
As a result, consultations began to deluge the department, calling for specific rulings, 
new forms had to be prepared in a rush, etc., while the personnel of the bureau 
could not be increased in proportion to meet this vast amount of extra work 
for lack of funds. The appropriation made by the legislature, amounting only to 
$25,000, was inadequate for the work to be carried out thereunder, as it developed 
later. Neither did it permit us to pay the right salary to the right kind of trained 
accountants needed. In spite of all this, the bureau has done a marvelous amount 
of work, as shown by the following figures: 

Taxes on income collected during the fiscal year 1919-20. 



1913 $30.42 

1914 132.47 

1915 279.13 

1916 2,278.08 



1917 S22, 921. 64 

1917-18 76, 508. 25 

1918 1,606,064.23 

1919 708, 267. 80 



As shown by Table No. 10, hereto annexed, there are still pending collection 
taxes on income, actually levied for the taxable years 1918 and 1919, amounting 
to $1,177,800.65, of which the payment of $210,694.74 has been contested, and has 
been the subject of claims and appeals to be considered and decided by the board 
of review and equalization. Besides this amount, a conservative estimate would 
show over $1,000,000 of taxes not appearing in this table, corresponding to returns 
not yet approved by the department, and which will be the subject of further ex- 
amination before the tax is definitely levied. 

Act No. 18, of May 13, 1920, has introduced very important amendments into the 
income tax law, especially with reference to the time of payments and method of 
procedure for levying the taxes in all cases where the returns of the taxpayers have 
been accepted as originally filed. These changes simplify the procedure, and 
inferentially the collection of taxes will be easier hereafter. 

The estimate of collections on account of income tax, made at the commencement 
of the fiscal year, amounted to $2,625,000, while the total sum actually collected 
amounted to '$2,458,575.63. This latter sum includes $41,801.1]- which had been 
paid under protest and kept in a trust fund until converted into insular revenues dur- 
ing the present fiscal year. The difference between the sum of $2,458,575.63, actually 
collected, and the estimate of $2,625,000, or $166,424.37, will be covered by the amount 
of taxes levied on those cases now on appeal before the board of review and equaliza- 
tion, aggre^ting the sum of $210,694.74, which exceeds by far the difference above 
noted. This fact will prove that our calculation was not only right but very con- 
servative. 

In closing it is only pertinent to repeat what was stated in the last annual report on 
the subject of income taxes. It is not unreasonable to anticipate that in the near 
future income taxes will constitutute the main source of revenue of the insular treasury, 
provided that the law, as it now stands, be reenacted at the coming session of the 
legislature, in view of the fact that the present income tax law is limited to the incomes 
returnable during the fiscal year 1919-20. 

BUREAU OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS. 

Receipts. — ^The receipts of the municipalities of the island from all sources during 
the year, excluding the proceeds of loans and bond redemption taxes, amounted to 
$3,391,189.25, consisting of $2,735,399.77 in "ordinarv funds," $63,069.85 in ''road 
funds," $410,585.15 in ''school funds," and $182,134.48 in "school tax." Receipts 
from taxes increased from $1,490,280.21 in 1918-19 to $2,148,517.39 in 1919-20, this 



REPOBT OF THE TBEASUBBB. 303 

increase being due mainly to the change in the apportionment of receipts from prop- 
erty taxes, by virtue of an act of the legislature approved July, 1919, establishing a 
system of local government and reorganizing municipal services. Pursuant to this 
law first-class municipalities, such as San Juan, Ponce, Mayaguez, and Arecibo, are 
allotted from said source eighty one-hundredths of 1 per cent iipon the assessed valua- 
tion of property, and those of the second and third class, that is to say, the remaining 
municipalities, receive ninety one-hundredths of 1 per cent upon said valuation. 
Receipts on account of school fund and school tax since October 30, 1919, when said 
act became operative, are received directly by the municipal treasurers instead of the 
school boards, as formerly, the latter having been abolished by the act referred to. 

Receipts from public-service enterprises, including water-supply systems, electric- 
light plants, and piers increased $5,565.95, this being due mainly to the increase in the 
proceeds from electric-li^ht plants. 

From the use of municipal property the municipalities derived during the past 
year the sum of $129,755.15, or $4,564.82 more than the preceding year. While almost 
all the sources of revenue included in this classij&cation showed increases, there were 
some slight decreases in the receipts from meat shops, pounds, cemeteries, theaters, 
and other property. 

A comparative statement of the amounts received from the several sources of muni- 
cipal income in 1918-19 and 1919-20 will be found in Table No. 11. A detailed state- 
ment of receipts for the fiscal year is given in Table No. 12. 

Ep!:penditures. — Expenditures chargeable against the total current receipts of the 
municipalities amounted to $3,025,243.27, an increase of $831,948.35 over the pre- 
ceding year. Disbursements on account of current expenses, as distinguished from 
outlays and payments on indebtedness, were $674,375.51 greater than in 1918-19, 
distributed among the items under that heading, viz, an increase of $256,199.83 in 
salaries, $166,844.80 in repairs and maintenance, and $251,330.88 in supplies, mate- 
rials, and incidentals. This increase is due to the continued rise in the prices of mate- 
rials and supplies in the market and to the high cost of living, which have been 
considerably higher during the past year than those for 1918-19, and also to the estab- 
lishment of the new municipal regime, which necessarily must be more expensive 
than the old one, in that it adds to the municipalities new services hitherto in charge 
of the insular government. 

Expenditures from current receipts for construction and improvements showed an 
increase of $6,931.78 compared with the preceding year. The total expenditures on 
country roads amounted to $153,412.74, or $35,977.84 more than in the preceding year. 

Expenditures from loans show a decrease of $54,025.07, as compared with the pre- 
vious year. 

The expenditures are itemized in Table No. 13, and a comparison with similar 
tables in previous reports is a credit to the administration. 

Available funds for general expenditures. — ^The cash balance in "ordinary funds" — 
that is, funds available for general expenditures as distinguished from "road funds," 
**loan funds," "school funds," "school tax," and others, the use of which is circum- 
scribed to specific purposes— was $471,702.17, an increase of $317,619.53 over the pre- 
ceding year. Deducting from this balance the amount of floating and current indebt- 
edness carried over to the next fiscal year there remains a surplus of $408,247.63. 

Municipal indebtedness. — In addition to the funded indebtedness amounting to 
$2,473,292.45, Table No. 14, the municipalities closed the year with a reported cur- 
rent indebtedness to the amount of $18,284.58, which indebtedness while incurred 
within budgetary appropriations, had not been paid before the close of the fiscal year, 
and reported a floating indebtedness amounting to $45,169.96, incurred in excess of 
the budgetary appropriations. 

General remarks. — During the past fiscal year a noteworthy change was introduced 
in the government of the municipalities of the island. This change was effected by 
the Legislature of Porto Rico through the enactment of a law establishing a system of 
local government and reorganizing municipal services, approved July 31, 1919. Pur- 
suant to this law the municipalities have been allowed a free hand in the management 
of their local affairs, thus being able to develop and carry on their activities practi- 
cally independent from the control of the central government, for the only super- 
vision which the latter exercises over municipal corporations is confined to the exami- 
nation and auditing of their accounts by the auditor of Porto Rico, as per section 20 
of the organic act, and to the approval by the commissioner of education of expendi- 
tures in connection with public education, as provided by section 17 of the act aforesaid. 

The most salient features of the new municipal law, which constitute the essence of 
the change in the system, are the following: 

(a) Organization of a municipal assembly and of a council of administration, the 
former by the direct vote of the people, and the latter by appointment by said assem- 
bly. The municipal assembly and the council of administration are vested with full 



304 BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

legislative and administrative powers, with certain limitations, in all matters of a 
purely local nature and connected with public works, education, charity, order, 

Eolice, safety, jails, asylums, health, hygiene, alignment of streets, opening of parks, 
uilding regulations, properties and municipal revenues, public roads, water supply, 
public lighting, sewers, city traffic, cemeteries, markets, slaughterhouses, meat shops, 
as well as all kinds of institutions, services, and other activities for the benefit and 
development of the municipality at large. The council of administration, which is 
constituted by the executive officers of the municipal government, such as the com- 
missioner of public service, police and prisons, the commissioner of. health and 
charities, the commissioner of finance, the commissioner of public works, and the 
commissioner of education, attend to the administrative matters of the municipality 
and also to legislative matters while the assembly is not in session, with the same 
restrictions as are imposed upon the heads of executive departments of the insular 
government. 

(6) Classification of municipalities into three categories, to wit: First class, to 
which there belong all municipalities whose last assessment reached or exceeded 
18,000,000; second class, all municipalities whose assessment reached or exceeded 
$3,000,000, but did not reach $8,000,000; and, third class, the remaining municipali- 
ties. This classification bears upon the revenues derived from property taxes and the 
number of members of the municipal assembly, which varies according to the category 
of each municipality. 

(c) New apportionment of receipts from property taxes, whereby all municipalities 
have obtained and will obtain in the future a substantial increase in their income. 

(d) Abolishment of the school boards whose duties and powers have devolved upon 
the municipalities. 

(e) Direct intervention in local sanitary matters formerly in charge of the insular 
government. 

Inasmuch as the new municipal law became effective in the month of November, 
1919 — that is to say, four months after the commencement of the fiscal year — it has been 
impossible to make an accurate comparative statement of cost between the two sys- 
tems. Nevertheless, and in spite of the increase in the receipts from property taxes 
obtained during the past fiscal year, the municipalities have confined their disburse- 
ments strictly to meet actual public necessities, and it is the consensus of opinion 
that the organizations created under the new law are rendering the community better 
services than their predecessors. 

BUREAU OF EXCISE TAXES. 

Excise-tax receipts. — The revenues derived from excise taxes during the fiscal year 
1919-20 amounted to $2,959,308.63, which, compared with the returns from the same 
source during the previous year, show an increase of $680,104.46. This increase was 
obtained mostly from taxes on cigarettes, patent medicines, internal-revenue licenses, 
and miscellaneous receipts. 

The amount of excise taxes actually covered into the treasury during the fiscal year 
IS $2,985,239.11, which includes $41,117.50 of protested taxes which had been paid 
during previous years and held in a trust f and until distribution was made as above 
stated. 

Of all the items covered by the excise-tax laws, shown in Table No. 15 appended 
hereto, the most important one is that covering the sale of cigarette stamps, which 
returned the sum of $1,152,849.94, or an increase of $235,296.65 over the preceding year. 
It is gratifying to note that this source of revenue has increased steadily during the past 
four years. 

The increase in the receipts from internal-revenue licenses ranks next in order of 
importance. Receipts from this source would have yielded a larger sum had it not 
been for the fact that the Federal prohibition law superseded that part of the insular 
law which authorized the sale of near beer, of 2i per cent per volume, under a 
license fee. 

The revenues accrued from patent medicines and miscellaneous receipts also show 
an increase amounting to $57,202.45 over the preceding year. 

Tobacco guarantee stamps for cigars and for leaf tobacco show a large decrease 
amounting to $55,122.50, due to the decision rendered by the First Circuit Court of 
Appeals of Boston, holding that the law which imposed such taxes was null and void. 

Leaf tobacco, — The crop for the present fiscal year was much larger than that for the 
previous year. This probably accounts for the increase in the exportation of cigars. 
As the quantity of leaf tobacco imported into Porto Rico during 1919-20 has been 
greater than in the previous year, it is to be presumed that some of this imported 
tobacco was mixed with the native product in the manufacture of cigars for export, 
in view of the fact that the use of tobacco guaranty stamps has been discontinued in 
pursuance of the judicial decision above mentioned. 



BBPORT OF THE TREASUBEB. 306 

^ Distilleries. — There were five distilleries in operation during the year. These dis- 
tilleries only worked at intervals, for short periods of time, and yielded about 1,686,631 
liters of commercial alcohol, which was released for consumption as follows: 

Liters. 

For medicinal and scientific purposes 128, 498 

For industrial purposes 121, 359 

For exportation 1,340,889 

Denatured, for fuel 94,885 

There were 233 cases brought before the courts for violations of the exciee-tax law, 
in connection with clandestine stills, reported by the police and internal-revenue 
agents and submitted to this department as provided by law. Of these complaints 
128 were disposed of by the courts, securing 91 convictions and 21 acquittals. The 
reamining cases are still pending in the courts. 

Table references. — Detailed statistics in connection with excise taxation are annexed 
and show: 

1. Comparative statement showing sources of excise taxation in Porto Rico, the 
quantity of merchandise in the case of the specific and the value thereof, in the case 
of the ad valorem tax levied, tax paid during the past four fiscal years, and the amount 
of such tax collected, including licenses and miscellaneous. (Table No. 15.) 

2. Average number of licenses during the past six fiscal years, with revenue received 
therefrom. (Table No. 16.) 

3. Taxable articles exported from Porto Rico during the past five fiscal years free 
of tax. (Table No. 17.) 

4. Comparative statement of excise-tax cases submitted by the internal-revenue 
agents during the fiscal years 1918-19 and 1919-20. (Table No. 18.) 

5. Comparative statement of leaf tobacco imported and grown in Porto Rico, and 
of exportations of leaf tobacco and elaboration of cigars for exportation and consump- 
tion in Porto Rico during the fiscal years 1918-19 and 1919-20. (Table No. 19.) 

Inspection of coffee. — The inspection of coffee has been intrusted to this depart- 
ment by legislative enactment. An internal-revenue agent, expert on coffee, has 
been detached for said work. 

Respectfully submitted. Jose E. Benedicto, 

Treasurer of Porto Rico, 

Table No. 1. — Estimate of insular revenues cash receipts for year ending June 30 , 1921. 

Customs $300,000 

United States internal-revenue receipts 1, 000, 000 

Property taxes, insular proportion 375, 000 

Excise taxes: 

Distilled spirits- 
Domestic $125, 000 

Imported 20, 000 

Still wines 500 

Cigars, domestic 300,000 

Cigarettes— 

.Domestic 1,000,000 

Imported 75, 000 

Prepared chewing tobacco 1, 000 

Prepared cut tobacco 2, 500 

Perfumery- 
Domestic 25,000 

Imported 50,000 

Patent medicines: 

Domestic 7, 000 

Imported 150,000 

Playing cards 19, 000 

Arms and ammunition 9, 000 

Matches, imported 45, 000 

Motor vehicles, tires, and accessories 120, 500 

Phonographs and accessories 3, 500 

Pianos, pianolas, and accessories 3, 500 

Moving-picture films 15, 000 

Gems and precious stones 60, 000 

Billiard tables and accessories 1, 000 

Photographic cameras and accessories 2, 500 

Internal-revenue licenses 245, 000 

Miscellaneous receipts 370, 000 

2,650,000 

Inheritance taxes 40, 000 

Telegraph and telephone receipts 140, 000 

Court fees and fines 40, 000 

Harbor and dock fees 20, 000 

Interest on loans to municipalities and school boards 70, 000 

Interest on ^bank's deposits 100, 000 

Income tax 2,500,000 

Miscellaneous 120, 000 

Deferred revenues 1, 650, 000 

Total 9,015,000 



306 



REPOBT OF THE GOVEBNOE OF POBTO BICO. 



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310 



KEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 3. — Transactions in Porto Rico by insurance companies in the calendar yea/ 

1919. 

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



Name of the company. 


Insurance 
written. 


Premiums 
thereon. 


Losses 

paid in 

1919. 


Losses 

incurred in 

1919. 


A.— FIRE RISKS. 

Baloise Fire Insurance Co, Bale, Switzerland. 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto, 

Canada 


$2,921,023.81 

2,340,473.34 

7,633,980.05 

374,085.00 

7,095,001.00 
7,037,626.09 
12,857,920.58 

967,848.00 

13,650,499.42 

16,219,480.46 

41,994,086.96 

21,219,041.16 

2,053,635.53 

4,813,035.64 

32,194,686.9fi 

14,241,359.20 
6,246 336.67 

2,577,860.00 
4,441,302.91 

3,013,385.00 


$15,034.60 

16,079.03 

34,038.35 

5,689.14 

24,575.02 
46,244.57 
52, 167. 14 

5,626.06 

31,402.49 

70,443.00 

75,713.86 

55,441.09 

17,346.00 

18,001.07 

42,971.29 

63,835.59 
19,147.01 

1,666.74 
33,864.36 

25,377.61 


$25,791.84 
7,187.32 
4,959.00 


$25,791.84 
7,187.32 


Commercial Union Assurance Co. (I.td.), 
London, England 


7, 659. 00 


Great American Insurance Co., New York, 
N. Y 




Guardian Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, 
England , 


6,284.48 
8,609.07 
44,442.63 


6,284.48 


Hartford Fire Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Home Insurance Co., New York, N. Y 

Insurance Co. of North America, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 


8,609.07 
44,442.63 


Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co. 
(Ltd.), Liverpool, England 


10,484.31 

165,426.82 

4,631.67 

7,499.00 


10,484.31 

165,426.82 

4,631.67 


North British & Mercantile Insurance Co., 
London, England 


Northern Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, 
England 


Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society, Nor- 
wich, England 


7,499.0C 
2,000.0C 


Palatine Insurance Co. (Ltd.), London, Eng- 
land 


Phoenix Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, Eng- 
land 


1,221.57 

4,643.58 

123,394.27 


1,221.57 

4,643.58 

148,894.27 


Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation, 
London, England .• 


Royal Insurance Co. (Ltd.), Liverpool, Eng- 
land 


L'Union de Paris, Paris, France 




Union Hispano-Americana de Seguros, Ha- 
bana, Cuba 






Western Assurance Co., Toronto, Canada 

Yorkshire Insurance Co. (Ltd.), York, Eng- 
land 


6,924.91 
36,057.35 


6,924.91 
36,057.35 




Total, fire risks 


203,892,667.78 


654,664.02 


457,557.82 


487,757.82 




B.— HURRICANE RISKS. 

Commercial Union Assurance Co. (Ltd.), 
London, England *. 


37,500.00 

1,500.00 

5,042,278.00 

1,587,276.72 

35,000.00 
1,901,176.72 


309.38 

12.38 

37,276.16 

15,467.62 

288.75 
18,569.44 






Insurance Co. of North America, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 






North British & Mercantile Insurance Co., 
London, England 






Northern Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, 
England • 






Phoenix Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, Eng- 
land 






Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation, 
London, England 












Total, hurricane risks 


8,604,731.44 


71,923.73 












C— EARTHQUAKE RISKS. 

Commercial Union Assurance Co. (Ltd.), 
London, England 


177,250.00 
412,591.00 

2,082,700.00 

188,310.00 


594.40 
1,378.70 

5,693.32 

633. 10 






Home Insurance Co., New York, N. Y 






Northern Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, 
England 






Phoenix Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, Eng- 
land 












Total, earthquake risks • 


2,860,851.00 


8,299.52 












D.— INLAND TRANSPORTATION RISKS. 

Great American Insurance Co., New York, 
N.Y 


5,000.00 
210,000.00 


10.00 
420.00 






Home Insurance Co., New York, N.Y 


41.38 


.41.38 


Total , inland transportation risks 


215,000.00 


430.00 


41.38 


41.38 



KEPOBT OF THE TBEASURER. 



hi 



Table No. 3. — Transactions in Porto Rico by insurance companies in the calendar year 

^9^9— Continued. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



Name of the company 



Insurance 
written. 



Premiums 
thereon. 



Losses 

paid in 

1919. 



Losses 

incurred in 

1919. 



A.— MARINE RISKS. 

British & Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 
(Ltd. ) , Liverpool, England 

Commercial Union Assurance Co. (Ivtd.), 
London, England 

Great American Insurance Co., New York, 
N. Y 

Hartford Fire Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Insurance Co. of North America, Philadel- 
phia, Pa - 

Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society, Nor- 
wich, England 

Phoenix Assurance Co. (Ltd.), London, Eng- 
land .' 

Reliance Marine Insurance Co. (Ltd.), Liver- 
pool, P^ngland 

Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation, 
London, England 

Royal Insurnace Co. (Ltd.), Liverpool, Eng- 
land 

St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Co., 
St. Paul, Minn 

Union Hispano- Americana de Seguros, Ha- 
bana, Cuba 



Total, marine risks. . 



$3,969,162.00 

1,731,412.39 

70,037.00 
15,226,381.30 

495,862.00 

2,521,696.00 

196,829.52 

12,212.00 

11,075,942.00 

9,799,066.35 

8,657,760.00 

3,243,900.00 



56,998,260.56 



$14,611.38 

5,383.61 

288.24 
29,277.22 

1,974.35 

7,345.73 

447.60 

44.55 

39,528.08 

40,053.38 

28,386.91 

11,064.25 



$5,789.14 
5,987.83 



45,967.52 
445.18 
70.36 



24,492.00 

11,593.43 

36,558.18 

472. 15 



178,405.30 



131,375.79 



$5,789.14 
5,987.83 



46,967.52 
448.18 
70.36 



24,492.00 

17,574.45 

36,558.18 

472.' 16 



138,359.81 



FIDELITY AND SURETY COMPANIES. 



A.— FIDELITY AND SURETY RISKS. 

American Surety Co., New York, N. Y 

Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland, Balti- 
more, Md 


$498,916.66 

2,751,444.11 
4,122,417.70 


$1,689.11 

17,322.01 
19,508.15 


$584.95 

2,335.95 
2,393.37 


$584.95 

7,335.95 
2,393.37 


National Surety Co, New York, N. Y 


Total, fidelity and surety risks 


7,372,778.47 


38,519.27 


5,314.27 


10,314.27 





CASUALTY AND MISCELLANEOUS INSURANCE COMPAISIES. 





Insurance 
written. 


Premiums collected 
for— 


Losses 

paid in 

1919. 




Name of company. 


liability 
for bodily 
injury to 
persons. 


Personal 
accidents. 


Losses 
incurred 
in 1919. 


A.— ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE 
RISKS. 

Emplovers' Liability Assurance Corpora- 
tion (Ltd.), London, England 


$462,750.00 
185, 100. 77 




$2,404.35 


$50.00 
1,602.05 


$525. 00 




$2,539.62 


1,736.05 






Total 


647, 850. 77 


2,539.62 


2,404.35 


1,652.05 


2,261.05 





312 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 3. — Transactions in Porto Rico by insurance companies in the calendar year 

^9iP— Continued. 

CASUALTY AND MISCELLANEOUS INSURANCE COMPANIES— Continued. 





Insurance 
written. 


Premiums collected for— 


Losses 

paid in 

1919. 




Name of company. 


Legal liability for— 


Accidents, 

excluding 

fire. 


Losses 
incurred 




Bodily 
injury to 
persons. 


Property 
damage. 


in 1919. 


B.— AUTOMOBILE AND TEAM 
INSURANCE RISKS. 

Employers' Liability As- 
surance Corporation 
(Ltd.), London, England. 


$576, 735. 00 

354,000.00 

3, 670, 000. 00 


• 




$16,011.81 


$3,602.82 
2,907.02 
2, 527. 80 


$4, 502. 83 




$11,816.55 


3,112.02 




$33,351.33 




8,223.80 










Total 


4,600,735.00 
200,000.00 
50,000.00 


33,351.33 
617.84 
235.00 


11,816.55 


16,011.81 


9, 037. 64 


15,838.65- 


C— BOILER EXPLOSION 
RISKS. 

Employers' Liability As- 
surance Corporation 
(Ltd.), London, England . 

D.— ELEVATOR OPERATION 
RISKS. 

Employers' Liability As- 
surance Corporation 
(Ltd.), London, England. 




i 






i 







LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



Name of company. 


Policies 

in force 

Dec. 31, 

1918. 


Policies 
written, 
revived, 
etc., in 
1919. 


Discon- 
tinued by 
death, 
lapse 
surrender, 
maturity 
in 1919. 


Policies 

in force 

Dec. 31, 

1919. 


Annuities 
in force, 
annual 

payments. 


Gross 

premiums 

paid. 


A.— WHOLE LIFE AND TERM 
INSURANCE, ENDOWMENTS, 
AND ANNUITIES. 

Imperial Life Assurance Co. 

of Canada, Toronto, Canada- 
Manufacturers' Life Insurance 

Co., Toronto, Canada 

Mutual Life Insurance Co., 

Nflw York N Y 


$37,000 

1,291,854 

84,717 

1,847,050 

3,595,062 


i}) 

$1,088,500 

2,284 

(2) 

1,208,417 


0) 
$367,040 
10,568 

(2) 

248,330 


$37,000 

2,013,314 

76,433 

1,847,050 

4,555,149 


0) 


0) 
$108,097.30 
3,332.31 




New York Life Insurance Co., 
New York N. Y 


(2) 


54,024.17 


Sun Life Assurance Co. of 
Canada, Montreal, Canada. . 


240,127.00 




Total 


6,848,683 


2,299,201 


625,938 


8,528,946 




405,580.78 









1 Reports for 1918 and 1919 not rendered. 
2 Report for 1919 not submitted as yet. 



EEPORT OF THE TBEASUBEE. 



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316 



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KEPOBT or THE TREASURfeE. 



327 



Table No. 11. — Comparative statement of receipts of all municipalities in 1918-19 

and 1919-20. 



Item. 


1918-19 
Total. Ordinary funds. 


1919-20 


Total. 


Ordinary funds. 


GENERAL REVENUES. 

Taxes ... 


$1,490,280.21 




$2, 148, 517. 39 




Property taxes, general funds 


$1,133,317.05 

126,000.83 

224,368.12 

6,594.21 


$1,809,000.45 

112,435.28 

218,337.16 

8,744.50 


Tax' on sale and slaughter of meat . . 






Business licenses 






Dog and other licenses 






Public service enterprises 


290,204.57 


295,770.52 


1 W^ater supply systems 


240,098.67 
29,628.42 
20,477.48 


240,947.96 
33,617.56 
21,205.00 


|/ Electric light plants 






Piers and docks 






Use of municipal propertv 


125,190.33 


129,755.15 


Sewers 


2,820.99 
42,618.01 
14,611.72 
18, 187. 84 
11,147.01 
13,862.05 
460.11 
2,844.06 
9, 708. 44 
8,930.10 


3,071.21 
47,219.31 
13,763.95 
18,517.77 
10,624.50 
10,139.50 

1,635.68 

1,994.00 
14,540.93 

8,248.30 


Markets 






Meat shops 






Slaughterhouses 






Animal pounds 






Cemeteries 






Municipal lots 






Theaters 






Hospitals (p&y patients) 






Other property 






Miscellaneous. 


25,020.24 


31,350.09 


Privileges 


1,736.57 

1,343.18 

9,779.20 

8.00 

12,142.24 

11.05 


1,338.74 


Permits 






2,713.20 
8,926.11 
3,090.72 
12,312.84 
2,968.48 


Fees 






Fines 






Interest 






Other current receipts 












Total general revenues 


1,930,695.35 




2,605,393.15 










Repayments 


62,361.87 




62,538.43 




Maintenance of insular prisoners 


29,956.23 

42.57 
32,363.07 


33,889.12 
62.00 


Transportation of patients to asy- 
lums 






Other repayments . . 






28,587.31 


Receipts not current 


76,i38.69 


67,468.19 


Sales . ... 


3,918.60 
16,727.43 
49,^92.06 


6,620.31 
12,633.05 
48 214 83 


Grants, donations, etc 






Miscellaneous 














Total receipts, ordinary funds 




2,063,195.31 




2,735,399.77 








SPECIAL FUNDS. 

Property tax: 

Road funds 


125,983.42 




63,069.85 
410,585.15 
25,464.67 




School funds . . 






Loan redemption funds 


23,303.52 






Property tax 






Interest on redemption fund 










Loans 


299, 167. 27 




94,633.33 




Proceeds-of loans 






Interest on loan funds 










School tax 






182,134.48 












Total special funds 


448,454.21 




775,887.48 










Total receipts, all sources . 


2,511,649.52 


2,063,195.31 


3,511,287.25 


2,735,399.77 





328 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



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330 



EEPOBT OF THE GOVEENOB OF POKTO RICO. 



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BEPOBT OF THE TEEASUBEB. 



331 



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332 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Table No. 14. — Outstanding indehtednesSy detailed by municipalities ^ June SO, 19t0. 





Fixed indebtedness. 




Total. 


Floating. 


Current. 


To insular 
Govern- 
ment and 
trust funds 


Bonded in- 
debtedness. 


Grand total .-. 


$2,578,619.69 


S45,169.96 


S18,284.58 


$41,872.70 


«2, 473, 292. 45 






Aguadilla 


68,500.00 

1,378.00 
12,285.56 
5,500.00 
43,000.00 
10,904.78 
1,500.00 
6, 500. 00 
4,600.00 

30,000.00 

17.20 

65,045.00 

325.00 

38,500.00 

22,602.31 

2,688.07 

9,000.00 

3,900.00 

4,000.00 

84,500.00 

71,290.80 

14,000.00 

17, 123. 46 

4,270.00 

47,500.00 

3,500.00 

1,000.00 

2,589.88 

31,342.00 

720.00 

48,000.00 

739.84 

29,633.50 

1,009.13 

500.00 

3,415.86 

11,400.00 

668,946.89 

1,710.00 

90,000.00 

16,500.00 

997,355.19 

1,365.44 

7,902.50 

1,446.34 

7,898.49 

1,490.22 

3,000.00 

18,224.23 

60,000.00 






5,500.00 

1,378.00 
2,400.00 


/ 60,000.00 
\ » 3,000.00 


Acuas Suenas 






Aibonito 


385.36 




9,600.00 


Anasco .. . . 




1 5, 500. 00 


Arecibo 








U3,000.00 


Arroyo 


904.78 






10, 000. 00 


Barceloneta 






1,500.00 


Barranquitas 








6, 500. 00 


j3arros 








14,600.00 


Bayamon 








/ 6,000.00 
\ 124,000.00 


Cabo Rojo 


17.20 

45.00 

325.00 






Caguas 






65, 000. 00 


Carolina 








Cayey 






/ 30.000.00 


Ciales 


102.31 
188.07 






\ 1 8, 500. 00 
/ 19,500.00 


Coamo 






\ 13,000.00 
2,500.00 


Comerio 






9,000.00 


Corozal 






3,600.00 


Dorado 






4, 000. 00 


Fajardo 






7,500.00 
2,000.00 


77,000.00 


Guayama 


1,790.80 




67, 500. 00 


GuavSfiilla 




14,000.00 


Gurabo 




558. 46 


565.00 


16,000.00 
1 4, 270. 00 


Hatillo 




Humacao ; 








47,500.00 
11,500.00 


Isabela 






2,000.00 


Jayuya 






1,000.00 


Juana Diaz 




2,589.88 




Juncos 






/ 26,000.00 
\ 15,342.00 


Lajas 


720.00 






Lares 






48,000.00 


Maricao 


739. 84 
8,612.03 
1,009.13 






Mayagiicz 


2,317.63 


8,703.84 


110,000.00 


Naguabo 


Naranjito 




500.00 

3,415.86 

400.00 




Patillas 








Penuelas 






11,000.00 


Ponce 


4,782.84 


12,818.61 


/ 390,000.00 

\ 1261, 34.'). 44 

11,200.00 

r 6,000.00 

\ 184,000.00 

15,000.00 

1976,535.01 

500. 00 


Quebradillas 


510.00 


Rio Piedras 






Salinas 






1,500.00 


San Juan 


20,820.18 

165. 4-1 

402. 50 

540.34 

1,898.49 

1,490.22 




San Lorenzo 




700.00 


San Sebastian ; 




7,500.00 


ToaAlta ^ 




900.00 


Toa Baja 




6,000.00 


Utuado 






VegaAlta 






3,000.00 
18,000.00 
60,000.00. 


Vieques 


224. 23 






Yauco 















1 Independent loans. 



REPORT OP THE TREASTJREE. 



833 






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334 



EEPOBT OP THif GOVERNOR OF PORTO BICO. 












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BEPOBT OP THE TBEASTTBEB. 



335 



Table No. 16. — Average number of licenses issued during the past six fiscal yearSy with 

revenue received therefrom. 





Manufacturers. 


Wholesale dealers. 


Retail dealers. 


Years. 


Num- 
ber.i 


Amount 
collected. 


Num- 
ber.i 


Amount 
collected. 


Num- 
ber.! 


Amount 
collected. 


1914-15 


756 
692 
704 
591 
740 
691 


$29,127.50 
22,595.00 
22,247.25 
19,873.75 
41,689.50 
38,776.25 


715 
655 
742 

1,057 
725 

1,235 


$43,145.00 
39,617.50 
40,307.00 
41, 832. 00 
33,422.25 
60,181.00 


14,929 
13,902 
15,315 
11,648 
8,926 
10,729 


$188,171.75 


191.5-16 


172,098.00 


1916-17 


160,686.75 


1917-18 


125,431.60 


1918-19 


94,785.60 


1919-20 


135,234.25 







Years. 


Billiard tables. 


Opium licenses. 


Physicians' 
licenses. 


Total. 


Num- 
ber.i 


Amoimt 
collected. 


Num- 
ber.i 


Amount 
collected. 


Num- 
ber.! 


Amount 
collected. 


Licenses 
in force. 


Tax re- 
ceived. 


1914-15 


577 
505 
489 
483 
492 
510 


$5,767.50 
5,052.50 
4,895.00 
4,830.00 
4,920.00 

10,207.50 


613 
761 
691 
163 
185 
168 


$250.36 
697. 02 
684.77 
658.62 
623.72 
3,127.49 






17,590 
16,515 
17,941 
14, 145 
11,100 
13,602 


$266,462.11 


19ir)-16 . 




... 


240, 060. 02 


1916-17 






228,820.77 


1917-18 


203 
32 
269 


$203.66 

129.00 

1,079.00 


192,828.87 


1918-19 


175,569.97 


1919-20 


248,605.49 







1 This number represents the average number of licenses in force each quarter through each year. The 
number issued annually is therefore in each instance four times as great as that given. 



336 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 



Table No. 17. — Taxable articles exported from Porto Rico during the past five fiscal years 

free of tax. 



Articles. 


1915-16 


1916-17 


1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


Increase 
1919-20 

over 
1918-19. 


Decrease 

1919-20 

compared 

with 
1918-19. 


Alcohol liters. . 


676,979 
290,501 
165,560 
110, 199 
159,248,855 
11,785,430 


859,436 

395, 132 

215,476 

180,290 

210,399,365 

9,571,250 

$4,905.48 


927,869 

175, 293 

95,971 

121,373 

181,779,520 

6,439,600 

$5, 633. 99 


484,859 
293, 184 
161,543 
133, 500 


1,093,639 
281, 154 
140,573 
190. 742 


608,780 




Bay rum do 


12,030 
20,970 


Alcohol in bay rum.. do 

Beer do 




37,242 
74,191,760 


Cigars number.. 


149, 124, 690 223. 316. 450 




Cigarettes do 

Medicines 


18,885,200 
$12, 134. 72 


5, 123, 850 
$8,110.91 


13,762,350 
$4,023.81 











Table No. 18. — Comparative statement of excise tax cases submitted by the internal' 
revenue agents daring the fiscal years 1918-10 and 1919-20. 




1919-20 



Administrative cases with fines imposed collected 

Administrative cases with fines imposed suspended 

Excise tax cases suspended without fines having been imposed 

Prosecution cases transmitted through the office of the attorney general, guilty. . 
Prosecution cases transmitted through the office of the attorney general, not guilty. 

Prosecution cases suspended 

Prosecution cases dismissed by court 



Total number of cases. 



1,830 
39 
200 
190 
117 
20 



2,405 



KEPOBT OP THE IREASUBEB. 



337 



Table No. 19. — Comparative statement of leaf tobacco imported and grown in Porto 
Rico and of exportation of leaf tobacco and elaboration of cigars for exportation and 
consumption in Porto Rico during the fiscal years 1918-19 and 1919-20. 



Leaf tobacco: 

Acreage planted and cultivated acres. . 

Total crop during the year pounds. . 

Leaf tobacco imported into Porto Rico... do 

Porto Rican leaf tobacco exported do 

Porto Rican leaf tobacco used in cigars, .do 

Imported leaf tobacco used in cigars do 

Total amount of leaf tobacco elaborated, .do 

Cigars exported: 

Elaborated from Porto Rican leaf to- 
bacco cigars. . 

Elaborated from a mixture of Porto Rican and 

imported leaf tobacco cigars. . 

Total amount of cigars elaborated for exporta- 
tion cigars. . 

Cigars consumed in Porto Rico: 

Elaborated from Porto Rican leaf tobacco.do 

Elaborated from a mixture of Porto Rican and 

imported leaf tobacco cigars. . 

Elaborated from imported leaf tobaqco. .do 

Total amount of cigars elaborated for consump- 
tion in Porto Rico cigars. . 

Total amount of cigars elaborated during the 
year cigars. . 



1918-19 



39,486 
23,691,825 
1,675,637 
17,585,796 
4,183,914 
1,430,942 
5,614,856 



84,709,883 

'64,414,807 

149,124,690 

29,364,681 

64,148,185 
821,936 

94,334,802 

243,459,497 



1919-20 



42,232 
25,339,211 
4,018,601 
21,008,999 
4,330,212 
3,213,553 
7,543,765 



50,216,000 
173,100,450 
223,316,450 
13,029,069 
84,994,679 



98,023,748 
321,340,198 



Increase 

1919-20 over 

1918-20. 



2,746 
1,647,386 
2,342,964 
3,423,203 
146,298 
1,782,611 
1,928,909 



108,685,643 
74,191,760 



20,846,494 



3,688,946 
77,880,701 



Decrease 

1919-20 over 

1918-20. 



34,493,883. 



16,335,612 
**"82i,*936 



338 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Table No. 20. — Comparative statistical report of sugar manufactured in Porto 



Municipality. 



Name of mill or 
property. 



Name of owner. 



Total crop In tons 
(2,000 pounds). 



1911 



1912 



Adjuntas — 

Do 

Do 

Aguada 

Do 

Arecibo 

• Do 

Arroyo 

Barceloneta . 

Barros 

Bayamon . . . 

Caguas 



Camuy 

Do 

Carolina 

Cayey 

Fajardo 

Guanica 

Guayama 

Guayanilla... 

Do*.'.'*.'.'! 

Hatillo 

Mormigueros . 
Humacao 

Do....... 

Jayuya 

JuanaDiaz... 

Juncos 

Las Marias . . . 

Do 

loisa 

Manati 

Maunabo 

Mayagues 

Do 

Morovia 

Naguabo 

Ponce 

Do 



Rincon 

Rio Piedras . . 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo.. 

Do 

San Sebastian 

Do 

Santa Isabel.. 

ToaBaja 

Vega Alta 

VegaBaja — 
Vieques 

Do.'.'.*.'!!.* 

VUlalba 

Do 

Yabucoa 



Esperanza... 

Pellejas 

Constancia.. 

Coloso 

Josefa 

Cambalache. 
Los Canos — 
Lafayette — 

Plazuela 

Vicenta . 



Hiiosde Tomas Pietrl 

Polle.ias Sugar & CofTee Co 

Luis Serrano 

West Porto Kico Sugar Co. (Inc.). . 

Jose TJamiron 

Central Cambalache Co 

Central Los Canos 

Sucrs. C. y J. Vantauzzi 

Plazuela Sugar Co 

Francisco Carro 

Juanita ! Central Juanita (Inc.) , 

Santa Juana i Ste. Anonyme dos Sucrs. de St. 

Jean. 

Soller ! Sailer Sugar Co 

Alianza \ Central Alianza (Inc.) 

Victoria , Fnrique Gonzales 

Cayey I Cayey Sugar Co 

Fajardo | Fajardo Suga^Co . 

Guanica Centralo.. 

Machete 

Eafina 

Fortuna 

San Francisco 

Bayanoy 

Eureka 

E jemplo 

Pasto Vicjo 

Santa Barbara 

Bocachica 

Juncos 

San Jose 

Luisa Josefa 

Canovanas 

Monserrato 

Columbia 

Rochelaise 

Ana Maria 

Maria 

Triunfo 

Mercedita 

Constancia 



8,969.50 



18,0Rf).55 
6,570.75 
6,651.00 

16,139.75 



6,406.10 
8,315.00 

351.00 
3,298.35 



Corsica 

Vannina 

Aguirre 

Buena Vista . . 

Esporanza 

Plata 

Fortuna 

Cortada 

Constancia 

Carmen 

San Vicente... 
Puerto Real... 
Playa Grande. 
Santa Maria... 

Caonilla 

Juliana . 



South Porto R ico Sugar Co 

Central Machete Co 

Mario Mercade o Hijos 

Sue. Francisco Mattel 

A. Lluberes & Sobrinos 

Central Bayaney (Inc. ) 

Central Eureka (Inc. ) 

Compania Azucarera El E jemplo. 

Central Pasto Vieio (Inc.) 

The Jayuya Development Co 

Cabrera Hermanos 

The Juncos Central Co 

Sebastian Cabrer 

E. M. Gastambido 

Loiza Sugar Co 

Federico Calat 

Fantauzzi, Verges y Clauzcl 

Mayaguez Sugar Co. (Inc.) 

Ramon Valdez, Sucn 

Hortensia de Leon 

Garzot & Fuertes 

Sucesion de J. Serralles , 

Corporacion Azucarera Sauri & 
Subira. 

New Corsica Centrale Co , 

Vannina Central Co 

Central Aguirre Co 

Prudencio Eugai 

Juan B. Villaiane 

Plata Sugar Co 

Juan A. Hernandez 

Santa Isabel Sugar Co 

Comp. Azucarera del Toa 

Carmen Centrale 

Rubert Hemanos 

Sucn. de Enrique Bird Arias 

Benitez Sugar Co 

Ch. Le Brun 

Tord & Zayas 

Central Juiiana (Inc.) 

Yabucoa Sugar Co 



1,427.60 

26,001.55 

63,748.05 

4,510.00 

4,098.25 

6.45 



Mereedita 

Total of sugar produced by factories which ground cane only during the years 
prior to 1920. 



Total 342,340.35 371,075.98 



5,260.90 
3,338.55 
7,294.60 



887.50 
12,56L35 



22.50 
13,653.00 
7,763.25 
5,200.46 
4,444.00 
3,707.50 

25.00 



4,945.13 
1,227.30 

4,600.00 

5,148.00 

20,799.90 



4,610.25 
6,607.00 
5,702.54 
12,219.85 
3,768.87 
4,518.35 
1,794.50 



12,299.60 
34,798.35 



11,064.00 



15,102.38 
6,073.38 
8,. 582. 75 

13,840.38 



4,912.50 
6,856.13 

800.00 
2,798.10 



3,253.63 
25,750-61 
48,030.50 
6,055.75 
4,308.95 
5.00 



5,930.35 
3,344.10 
6,738.38 
375.00 
1,484.45 
12,489.50 



13,59L75 
6,487.50 
7,118.00 
4,925.05 
4,723.00 
50.00 



9,115.00 
1,778.25 

7,012.25 

7,810.63 

26,162.14 



930. 25 



4,852.03 
6,969.50 
7,676.63 
11,805.60 
3,595.75 
4,952.64 
1,075.60 



9,420.55 
39,308.00 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 339 

Rico — Crops of 1911 to 1920 y includiiig quantity of cane ground in 1920* 



Total crop m tons (2,000 pounds). 



1913 



562. 75 



10,576.35 



20,336.10 
7, 600. 00 
8, 078. 50 

15,474.15 



7,546.85 
7,362.85 

900.00 
3, 718. 10 



2, 910. 00 
25, 926. 00 
61,336.75 
7,691.00 
5,613.03 
4.00 



6,061.25 
3,683.35 
8,428.62 
490.00 
1, 298. 90 
13,030.25 



15,762.88 
7,797.50 
6,103.50 
4,224.00 
6,689.50 
40.00 



7,305.63 
1,478.70 

5,397.39 
12,006.88 
27,889.82 



2,006.60 



6,739.50 
11, 190. 50 

6,684,50 
11,875.00 

2,919.57 

3,688.76 
761.63 



10, 450. 00 
40,318.99 



1914 



218.00 



8, 850. 00 



15, 705. 00 
5, 731. 00 
8,958.00 

14,267.54 



3,404.40 
5,195.00 

1, 112. 00 
2, 735. 00 



2, 250. 00 
23,573.00 
62, 061. 23 

8.156.00 

7,250.00 
4.25 

1,237.50 



5,506.00 
2,911.00 
6,860.00 
353.00 
2,000.00 
9,101.00 



11, 896. 25 
4,954.37 
6,156.00 
3,591.00 
4,500.00 
30.00 



7, 714. 00 
1,800.00 

5, 836. 00 
7, 224. 25 
26,916.00 



1,875.00 



6,983.00 
6, 800. 20 
8, 110. 00 
8,600.00 
5, 225. 12 
5,737.50 



8,315.00 
20, 133. 18 



1915 



240.00 



7, 644. 00 



12, 814. 75 
6, 043. 13 
9, 196. 88 

11,490.62 



3,593.25 
5,122.00 

700.00 
3,060.00 



1, 890. 00 
21,818.00 
63,355.27 

9,890.00 

6, 886. 00 
5.00 

1,041.00 



5, 291. 00 
2,590.00 
5,027.00 
514.00 
2,583.00 
8,364.00 



11, 007. 25 
5,673.54 
5, 824. 00 
4,363.00 
4,486.85 
70.00 



8,160.51 
2, 102. 00 

6, 862. 00 
5, 188. 61 
31,981.92 



604.00 



9,361.00 
7,957.50 
6,327.00 
9,339.00 
4,627.00 
5,655.25 
660.00 



9, 711. 80 
17,365.30 



1916 



440.00 



11, 903. 00 



23, 443. 00 
8,360.87 
9,378.00 

18,819.50 



6,710.50 
12, 923. 00 



1, 026. 00 
5,313.00 



5, 389. 00 
36,338.00 
75,557.32 
11,589.17 

8,000.00 
10.00 

1,760.00 



6, 804. 00 
4,594.00 
8, 353. 00 
654. 60 
5,529.00 
15,454.00 



16,313.30 
8,719.30 
7, 213. 00 
6, 058. 00 
5, 793. 40 
30.00 



9,308.87 
1, 875. 00 

8, 853. 00 
10, 464. 75 
39,530.00 



727. 62 



9,209.00 
10,687.75 

9,818.00 
12,542.00 

4,940.75 

6, 702. 00 
638.00 



15,887.47 
19,929.31 



1917 



373.00 



13,501.50 



23, 129. 00 
6,353.68 
8, 685. 00 

16,500.00 



6,520,00 
11, 114. 00 

1,010.00 
4, 806. 00 



5, 221. 00 

29,34.3.82 

81, 000. 00 

10,557.00 

7,900.00 

10.00 

3,000.00 

745.00 

6,064.00 

6, 276. 00 

11,496.87 

957.00 

6, 230. 00 

14,925.00 



15.00 
14,706.13 
7,171.00 
7, 233. 50 
7,284.00 
7,993.38 
40.00 
1,276.25 
10, 204. 00 
2, 206. 00 

11,044.00 
10,545.00 
48,900.00 



1, 795. 60 



10, 780. 00 
7, 759. 55 
11,024.00 
12,044.00 
5, 693. 00 
7,374.89 
850.00 



17,285.00 
24, 158. 52 



1918 



235.00 



12,690.06 



15, 197. 63 
5, 129. 38 
7, 826. 00 

14,487.88 



7,510.00 
7,187.00 

769.00 
2,343.51 



2, 778. 00 

35, 818. 00 

76,669.86 

10,237.00 

7,012.00 

13.00 

2,666.00 

946.00 

3, 980. 00 

6, 074. 00 

10, 777. 13 

798.65 

7, 214. 00 

16,231.00 



15.00 
15,413.50 
6,612.73 
6,052.00 
5, 200. 00 
5, 135. 00 
40.00 
3, 205. 00 
9,523.00 
4,508.73 

7, 581. 00 
12, 135. 25 
47,200.00 



1,854.00 



11, 173. 00 
8,573.75 
10,059.88 
10,925.00 
2,984.00 
5,327.52 
237.00 



13, 724. 24 
11,677.85 



1919 



28.00 
284.40 



10, 666. 00 



11, 021. 00 
4,375.25 
13, 093. 75 
11, 749. 00 



7,092.50 
7,031.00 

458.00 
1, 243. 00 



2, 636, 75 

31, 193. 00 

65,685.00 

9.645.00 

O; 438. 00 

20.00 

2, 740. 00 

1,367.50 

3,527.00 

5, 152. 00 

9, 681. 13 

585.28 

5, 672. 00 

13,130.50 

4.00 

15.00 

15, 184. 2^ 

5, 276. 69 

5, 189. 'X) 

4, 744. 00 

3, 969. 89 

17.00 

3, 254. 88 

8,593.03 

1,590.00 

7,392.88 

11, 733. 25 

44,632.00 

31.16 



1,462.00 



8, 932. 00 
6, 913. 25 
8, 400. 00 
10,379.00 
6,000.00 
8, 208. 00 
959.00 



12,447.65 
5,909.12 



9120 



25.00 

234.85 

21.00 

11,056.00 

4.55 

16, 927. 87 

5,429.87 

15,334.75 

17, 250. 00 

4.00 

9, 290. 00 

11,975.00 

899.00 

2, 690. 22 

7, 805. 88 

4,219.00 

43,000.00 

59,064.00 

12, 150, 00 

8,057.00 

10,00 

3,503.00 

2,226.60 

5,045.00 

6,997.63 

10, 160. 75 

576. 80 

6,565.00 

17,473.50 

5.00 

8.00 

16, 925. 13 

8,928.38 

6,559.00 

4,937.00 

4, 250. 00 

30.00 

3, 029. 00 

10, 835. 32 

2, 490. 19 

7, 229. 00 

12,921.50 

50,483.00 

113.58 

10.75 

1,535.55 

1.00 

11,072.00 

8, 034. 62 

12, 662. 00 

14,960.00 

6,073.00 

9,902.50 

1,300.00 

260.00 

185.00 

13,333.75 



Quantity 

of cane 

ground in 

1920 
(in tons). 



2,330.00 

92.00 

106,561.00 

63.90 

160,001.11 

48, 927. 23 

135,481.00 

157,594.00 

40.00 

846.704.00 

117,977.00 

9,333.00 

31,674.95 

75,538.01 

36, 980. 00 

382,000.00 

553,879,00 

114,285.00 

74,040.00 

125.00 

33,150.00 

24,612.38 

49,072,00 

36,940,94 

96, 286, 62 

5,506,88 

58,000.00 

165,530.14 

83.33 

100.00 

153, 396. 21 

83,606.65 

62,844,00 

47,686,00 

i}) 



32,042,00 
85,561,00 
23,337,66 

69, 261. 00 
117, 175, 66 
478,077.00 



180.00 

15,417.00 

30.00 

102,000.00 

77,046.98 

122,509,00. 

136,137.90 

59,680.00 

97, 701. 61 

12,000.00 

2,800,00 

2,053.00 

124,020.04 



398,003.64 



351,665.79 



346,490.43 



483,589.6 



503,061.18 



453,796.55 



406,002.56 



486,070.79 



5,239,471.10 



^ Not reported. 



Appendix VI. 

REPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE INTERIOR. 

San Juan, P. R., September 22, 1920. 

Sir: Complying with the provisions of article 13 of the act of the United States 
Congress, entitled "An act to provide a civil government for Porto Rico, and for other 
purposes," approved March 2. 1917, 1 have the honor to submit for your consideration 
the annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, concerning the work accom- 
plished by the department of the interior. 

The duties of the commissioner of the interior are prescribed in section 16 of the 
said act as follows: "The commissioner of the interior shall superintend all works of 
a public nature, have charge of all public buildings, grounds, and lands, except 
those belonging to the United States, and shall execute such requirements as may 
be imposed by law with respect thereto, and perform such other duties as may be 
prescribed by law." 

In addition, by the provisions of sections 13 and 38 of the same act, the commis- 
sioner of the interior is a member of the council to the governor, known as the 
executive council, and of the public service commission; and by the provisions pre- 
scribed by insular laws he is ex officio chaiiman of the "homestead commission." 
which is in charge of the lease and sale of public lands and houses constructed with 

EuIdHc funds to laborers and artisans, chairman of the San Juan Harbor Board; mem- 
er of the board created to intervene in the execution of an act extending relief for 
damages caused by the earthquakes of 1918: of the park commission, which is in charge 
of the organization of the ^funoz Rivera Park; of the board established for the erec- 
tion of a leper asylum; and of the board of review and equalization, established for 
the purpose of revising assessments on properties and settling claims and differences 
in connection therewith. By appointments made by the governor, he is a member 
of the board of trustees of the University of Porto Rico and of the board of trustees 
of the Carnegie Library. 

His membership in all these boards and commissions involves the employment of 
much of his time and attention in the solution of the problems and the performance 
of duties connected therewith, to the detriment of his incumbencies as commissioner 
of the interior. 

This report comprises the separate reports of the bureau of public works, of the 
division of public buildings, division of municipal works, division of public lands 
and archives, bureau of insular telegraph, division of harbor and docks, irrigation 
service, and the division of disbursements and accounts, which cover the activities 
of the department of the interior, and also the report of the San Juan Harbor Board 
and of the homestead commission. 

Bureau op Public Works. 

As provided by law, this bureau is under the direction of a superintendent having 
charge of the work of surveying, construction, and maintenance of public roads and 
bridges, harbors and docks, and the supervision of the construction and maintenance 
of all municipal roads. The work as organized is carried out by means of four 
divisions as follows: {a) Surveying; {h) construction; (c) designing and estimates, and 
{d) maintenance and repairs of public roads and bridges, each office being directly 
in charge of an engineer who, under the general supervision of the superintendent, 
performs all the obligations imposed on him by law and in addition carries out the 
work that the commissioner of the interior assigns him from time to time, such as 
reports concerning railroad franchises, docks, etc., whenever these are requested by 
the public service commission. 

The superintendent is also^ called to report upon all engineering questions sub- 
mitted for investigation by any department or municipal corporation of the island; 
to prepare and sign, with the approval of the commissioner of the interior, in the name 
of The People of Porto Rico, all contracts and agreements made for the construction 
and repair of public works, and to perform all other duties that the law or the com- 
missioner of the interior may assign to the bureau of public works. 

The following table shows a general statement of appropriations and expenditures 
previous to and during the year 1919-20 in the different divisions comprising the 
bureau of public works. 

341 



342 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Statement of expenditures. 





Appropria- 
tion. 


Repay- 
ments. 


Trans- 
ferred 
to 
appropri- 
ation. 


Total 
credits. 


Expended 

prior 

fiscal 

voar 

1919-20. 


Expended 

during 

fiscal 

v^ar 

1919-20. 


Balance 
at end of 

fiscal 

voar 
1919-20. 


Maintenance, repair, 

and construction of 

insular roads and 

bridges: 

1919-20 


$807,000.00 
650,000.00 

323,000.00 

6,000.00 

25,000.00 

1,961,610.33 






$807,000.00 
661,748.07 

323,250.00 

6,000.00 

25,000.00 

1,961,610.33 




$769,14.1.82 
13,544.18 

145,983.07 

4,948.73 
21,553.03 
559,407:59 


$37,8.'i4.l8 


1918-19 


$11,748.07 




$647,575.07 

109,596.48 

773.21 

416. 11 

701,906.07 


628.82 


Bridge and road con- 
stnict ion, acts ofl913, 
1914,1915, 1916, 1917 .. 


$250.00 


67,537.06 


EarthquaVp relief fund: 

Repair of Caminero 

houses 




278.06 


Repairing bridges 
and culverts 






3,030.86 


Road-bond fund 1916 
($2,000,000) 






700.236.67 










Total 


3,772,610.33 


11,748.07 


250.00 


3,784,608.40 


1,460,266.94 


1,514,642.421809.565.65 






' 



CONSTRUCTION OP ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

The works under construction throughout the island have been greatly hindered 
by the unsettled labor conditions and the shortage of building materials. On account 
of these abnormal conditions the work of construction of bridges and culverts has 
been affected to such an extent that the work completed during the year was a great 
deal less than that reported on the previous fiscal year. 

However the work accomplished consisted in the completion of 31.4 kilometers of 
macadamized road and 8 reinforced concrete bridges, having a total length of 246 
linear meters. The greater part of this work was carried out with funds appropriated 
by law No. 71 "to authorize an issue of bonds of The People of Porto Rico in the 
amount of $2,000,000 for the construction of roads and bridges and for other purposes,*' 
approved on April 13, 1916. The remaining work has been paid from the general 
appropriation for the construction, maintenance, and repair of roads and bridges and 
from several appropriations especially approved by the legislature. 

The different contracts entered into during the year and the corresponding amounts 
are shown in the following table: 



Date of 
contract. 



July 21,1919 
July 22,1919 

July ^,1919 
Aug. 18,1919 

Sept. 15, 1919 
Dec. 12,1919 
Dec. 13,1919 
Dec. 29,1919 



Do 

Jan. 24,1920 
Jan. 30,1920 



Feb. 3,1920 

Mar. 26,1920 

Apr. 19,1920 

Apr. 20,1920 

Apr. 26,1920 

May 4,1920 

Kay 14,1920 



Nature of work. 



5.60 kilometers of the Yauco-Lares road, kilometers 21-26.60 

17-meter span reinforced-concrete bridge over Yaguez River road No. 2, 

Agiiadilla-Mayaguez section. 

Reinorced-concrete bridge over -Achiote Creek Ciales-Jnana Diaz road 

6-meter snan reinforced-concrete bridge over Las Palmas Creek, Aguadilla- 

San Sebastian road. 

3.24 kilometers of the Comerlo-Cidra road, kilometers 0-3.24 

1,400 linear meters of cnrb and gutter on San Antonio-Martin Pena road 

4.8 kilometers of the Corozal-Morovis road 

10-meter span reinforced-concrete bridge over Aguacate Creek, road No. 3, 

Humacao-Yabucoa section. 

3.88 kilometers of the La Muda-Guaynabo road 

10 kilometers of the Loiza-Juncos road, kilometers O-IO 

Reinforced-concrete arch bridge 40 meters long over Rio Blanco Lares-Ad- 

juntas road. 
Reinforced-concrete bridge 40 meters long over Rio Grande de Jayuy sroad. 

No. 15. 
5 kilometers of the Maricao-Indiera road and 2 reinforced-concrete bridges 

20 meters long each. 
Reinforced-concrete bridge 20 meters long over Naranjos Creek, Comerio-Cidra 

road. 
Reinforced-concrete bridge 30 meters long over Maricao River at Las Ve^as . . 
Reinforced-concrete bridge 20 meters long over Cibuco River Corozal-Morovis 

road. 
2 kilometers of road, No. 2, Isabela-Aguidilla section (relocation of Cuesta de 

Aguadilla). 
4 kilometers of San Sebastian-Las Marias road, kilometers 3-7 

Total contracted for 



Amount of 
contract. 



$78,477.00 
19,528.00 

12,626.97 
3,325.80 

37,469.50 
4,480.00 

52,952.48 
7,953.30 

44,002.59 
64,692.75 
33,919.50 

12,503.70 

81,475.00 

18,243.00 

18,514.92 
13,343.42 

24,799.00 

39,269.70 



567,556.53 



EEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONEK OP THE INTERIOB. 



343 



In addition to these contracts work was continued during the year on public roads 
and bridges previously contracted for and there was a certain amount of work done by 
administration amounting to approximately $180,000. 

The total amount expended during the year in the construction of roads and bridges 
is shown below: 



Roads: 

Lares-Ad juntas $103, 909. 13 

Ciales-Juana Diaz 70, 131. 80 

Corozal-Barros 29, 5 63. 12 

Las Vesjas-Maricao 20, 278. 66 

Yauco-Lares 55 , 138. 72 

Arecibo-Lares 40, 587. 14 

Marirao-Indiera 16, 328. 73 

Vieques 17, 799. 61 

Loiza-Juncos 11, 814. 52 

Comerio-^idra 25,314.93 

La Muda-Guavnabo 8,570.47 

Corozal-Morovis 32, 034. 62 

San Sebastiqn-Las Marias 13, 535. 99 

San Antonio-Martin Pena 128, 471. 55 

Cuesta de Aguadilla 6, 577. 92 

Bridges: 

Yaguez 21,969.14 

Tnabon 8, 839. 76 

Descalabrado 60. 87 

Rio Grande Arecibo 19, 300. 36 

Rio Blanco 14,864.70 

Achiote 5,509.18 



Bridges— Continued. 

Maricao $7,305.07 

Aguacate 9, 082. 54 

Cibuco 2, 944. 42 

Trujillo Alto 18,939.58 



Las Palmas.. 

Bucarahones 

Rio Grande de Jayuya.. 
Las Vegas 



5,248.84 
4,776.22 
4,314.92 
9,641.70 

Grand total 714,854.21 

RfeSUMft. 

Expended on road survey, including 
right of way, and indemnity for San 

Antonio-Martin Pena road 62,232.20 

Expended on road construction 519, 824. 71 

Expended on bridge and culvert con- 
struction 132, 797. 30 



Total expended 714,854.21 



The following is a detailed statement of the different appropriations from which 
this expenditure of $714,854.21 was paid: 

Appropriation for the construction, maintenance, and repairs of public roads and bridges, fiscal 

year 1919-20 $42,731.08 

Special appropriations for bridges and road constructions approved by the legislature 167, 952. 21 

Two million dollars road bond fund for road and bridge constructions; act of 1916 504, 170. 92 

Total expended 714,854.21 

The total length of macadamized roads completed is 31.4 kilometers, distributed in 
the following manner: 



Kms. 

Maricao-Tndiera 1.0 

Comerio-Cldra 2. 

Vieques 8 

San Antonio-Martin Pena 2.0 

Total 31,4 



Kms. 

Lares- -A. d juntas 9. 2 

(jiales-Juana Diaz 6. 

Yauco-Lares 2.5 

Las Vegas-Maricao 1.6 

Corozal-Barros 2.8 

San Sebastian-Las Marias 2.0 

Corozal-Morovis 1.5 

The following is a brief description of the work done during the year on the different 
roads under construction: 

Lares- Ad juntas road. — This section of road No. 8, Aguadilla-Adjuntis, begins at 
the town of Lares and ends at kilometer 32 of road No. 6, Adjuntas-Utuado section. 

As stated in last year's report, a contract was approved on January 21, 1918 amount- 
ing to $65,444, for the construction of the first 5 kilometers at the Adjuntas end. At the 
end of the last fiscal year the grading and masonry structures were finished, with the 
exception of a 6-meter span culvert; the remaining work was completed during the 
present fiscal year. 

On March 31, 1919, another contract was approved for the amount of $49,605.50, 
for the construction of 4.9 kilometers of this same road, which section goes as far as 
the Yahuecas River. 

On June 5, 1919, a third contract was entered into for the construction of 4 kilometers 
of this road between Rio Blanco and Garganta Vilella, at the Lares end, which contract 
amounted to $40,656.50. The work of construction on this section is under progress, 
and on June 30, 1920, the excavations for grading and culverts were completed. 

The total amount expended during the year in the construction of this road was 
$103,909.13, paid from the $2,000,000 road bond fund of 1916. 

Ciales-Juana Diaz road, — This is the third road under the system which will connect 
the north and south parts of the island, the first being the one built years ago from 
San Juan to Ponce, through the town of Aibonito; the second one, known as road 
No. 6, between Ponce and Arecibo, through the towns of Utuado and Adjuntas. The 
total length of the Ciales-Juana Diaz road is 69 kilometers, of which there has already 
been built a section of 2Q kilometers from Manati to Cialitos, on the north coast, and a 
stretch of 18 kilometers from Juana Diaz north toward the town of Villalba and the 
Main Divide. 



344 BEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

The contract let on April 1, 1918, for the construction of the remaining 8 kilometers^ 
between Juana Diaz and Destierro, which had been under construction duringthe 
previous year, had been completed and the total cost of the work amounted to 
166,073.16. 

On April 28, 1919, another contract was approved for the amount of $65,640.45, 
for the construction of 6 kilometers between Maria Olaya Creek and the main divide. 
This construction began in May, 1919, and on June 30, 1920, 4 kilometers had entirely 
been completed, the grading and bridging of the remaining 2 kilometers had been 
completed in part. 

The total expenditure on the several contracts on this road paid out from the 
12,000,000 road bond fund amounts to $70,131.80 during this year. 

Yauco-Lares road. — On January 1, 1918, a contract was approved for the amount of 
153,000 for the construction of 6 kilometers of this road between kilometers 15 and 21. 

As stated in last year's report, the remaining work under this contract was the 
bridging and the macadamizing of the last 2 kilometers, which work has been com- 
pleted during the present fiscal year. The total cost of this construction amounts to 
$90,249.45, being $37,249.45 in excess of the original contract. This excess was due 
to the cost of four large culverts not included in the original contract on account of 
lack of funds at the beginning and the increase in width of the cross section of the 
road, so as to make it a second-class road instead of a third-class road, which affected 
the volume of excavations and the amount of broken stone, which was changed from 
4 to 4 J meters in width. Also the earthquake of October, 1918, caused great slides on 
the slope side. 

Another contract was approved on July 21, 1919, for the construction of 5.66 kilo- 
meters between kilometers 21 and 26.66. This section crosses the main divide at 
barrio Carrizales, and ends at the place known as Hacienda Indiera, where it will 
give easv access to the barrios in this vicinity, which barrios are among the richest 
of the island in coffee production. 

At the end of the fiscal year the work completed included the excavations of 3.7 
kilometers, the completion of one 2-meter span culvert, seven concrete drain-pipes 
of 80 centimeters diameter, and a retaining wall. 

The total amount expended on this work during the fiscal year was $55,138.72, 
paid from the $2,000,000 road bond fund. 

Mayaguez- Maricao road. — The construction of the last 5 kilometers of this road had 
been brought to an end during the fiscal year, making this the second road that has 
been completed with the $2,000,000 road bond fund provided by law No. 71 of April, 
1916, the first being the Arecibo-Lares road. 

The completion of this road was done under the contract approved on February 7, 
1919, amounting to $29,447.79. 

The final cost of this work amounted to $32,188.19, and the amount expended on 
this road during the year, paid from the $2,000,000 road bond fund, was $20,278.66. 

Corozal'Barros rood.— The contract let on February 20, 1919, amounted to $30,401^ 
including the construction of 4.5 kilometers of this road. 

Due to the fact that the contractor did not display the necessary activity in the ful- 
fillment of his contract within the time specified, in spite of all the efforts made by 
the bureau of public works to that effect, and on account of the requests made by 
merchants and farmers of that locality, it was thought convenient and more expedient 
for the bureau of public works to take over the contract and finish the work by admin- 
istration, which was accomplished by means of an agreement executed between the 
superintendent of public works and the contractor, with the approval of the com- 
missioner of the interior. 

Under this agreement the bureau of public works undertook the completion of the 
remaining work, and by means of efficient organization the cost of same was kept as 
low as possible within the conditions prevailing, notwithstanding the fact of the 
great increase in the cost of materials and labor and the disturbances caused by labor 
agitators that were campaigning around this district. 

The work undertaken was successfully carried out at an expenditure of $31,857.47; 
in this amount is included the work done by a subcontractor who took charge of the 
construction of the masonry culverts. 

This road is No. 4 on the list approved by the economy commission in 1916 and is 
intended to be completed as far as the town of Barros, under the appropriation from 
the $2,000,000 road bond fund. 

The total amount spent on this road during the fiscal year just ended amounted to 
129,563.12. 

San Sebastian-Las Marias road. — ^As stated in last year's report, a contract was 
entered into in December, 1918, for the construction of the /irst 3 kilometers of this 
road, and on June 30, 1919, 1 kilometer had been entirely completed. The other 2 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OP THE INTERIOR. 345 

kilometers were completed during the present fiscal year. The total amount ex- 
pended on this contract was 114,359.80, paid from appropriation No. 234, which 
appropriation corresponds to an act approved bv the legislature in March, 1913. 

On May 14, 1920, another contract was approved for the construction of 4 kilometers, 
between kilometers 3 and 7, at an estimated cost of $39,269.70. 

Due to the fact that this contract was let out so late in the fiscal year, the work done 
consists only in the grading of 2 kilometers. 

The total amount expended during the year in the construction of this road was 
$13,535.99, of which $7,569.82 corresponds to the especial appropriation approved on 
March, 1913, and $5,966.17 paid from the $2,000,000 road-bond fund. 

Corozal- Morovis road. — This section of road. No. 20 of the general plan, has a length 
of 12 kilometers. It begins at kilometer 4 of the Corozal-Barros road and ends at the 
town of Morovis. 

On December 13, 1919, a contract was approved amounting to $52,952.48, providing 
for the grading of 2.3 kilometers, the macadamizing of 4.8 kilometers, and the con- 
struction of the masonry culverts. The work done up to June 30, 1920, included the 
grading of 2.3 kilometers, the construction of two masonry culverts 4 meters span, 
and 11 concrete drainpipes 80 centimeters in diameter. 

The total amount expended on this road during the year amounted to $32,034.62, 
of which $30,993.55 were paid from the $2,000,000 road-bond fund, and the bal- 
ance of $1,041.07 from the remainder of an appropriation approved by the legislature 
in March, 1913. 

Maricao-Indiera road. — This section of road. No. 14 in the plan, leads from the town 
of Maricao and connects with the Yauco-Lares road at a place known as Carrizales, 
having an approximate length of 18 kilometers. 

As this road is No. 11 on the list giving the order of preference approved by the 
economy commission in 1916, its construction was decided upon as soon as funds were 
available from the sale of the second million dollars provided by act No. 71, approved 
in 1916. 

On March 26, 1920, a contract was entered into for the construction of 5 kilometers 
of macadamized road and two reinforced concrete bridges, at an estimated cost of 
$81,475. 

The construction work on this road has proceeded at such a rapid pace that by June 
30, 1920, there had been completed 2 kilometers of grading, one of which was macad- 
amized. Also the construction of two concrete culverts of 1.5 meters span, and five 
concrete drainpipes of 80 centimeters diameter were completed.. 

The total amount expended on this construction during the year was $16,328.73, 
paid, as previously stated, from the $2,000,000 road-bond fund. 

ComenO'Cidra road. — On the general plan of roads approved this road number is 22, 
which leads at kilometer 49 on road No. 1, Caguas-Cayey section, at the place known as 
Las Cruces, and going through the town of Cidra, joins road No. 9, between Bayamon 
and Comerio towns, at kilometer 23.4, which is located at about 3 kilometers from 
Comerio. 

The section Las Cruces-Cidra was completed in the year 1906, and the remaining 
section between Comerio and Cidra was included with other roads to be built with 
the funds appropriated in 1916 by act No. 71. 

As soon as funds were available, a contract was entered into amounting to $37,169.50, 
which contract was approved on September 15, 1919, providing for the construction 
of 3.2 kilometers of macadamized road. Work began, and it has been pushed in spite 
of the many difficulties experienced by the contractor, such as labor strikes and 
scarcity of materials for construction. 

At the end of the fiscal year the work accomplished included the grading on a length 
of 2.6 kilometers, the construction of three culverts of 1 meter span, and ten concrete 
drainpipes, and the macadamizing of 1.6 kilometers. 

The completion of this road will give access to a very rich region planted with 
coffee and tobacco, and to a great number of citrus and pineapple plantations. 

The total amount expended on this construction during the year just ended was 
$25,314.93. 

Road on the island of Vieques. — Owing to the great difficulties in obtaining laborers 
in the island of Vieques, the bureau of public works has been compelled to start the 
construction of this road by means of convict labor, and for this purpose a convict 
camp was established. 

As the road on Viec^ues Island was placed as No. 7 on the list approved by the 

economy commission in 1916, its construction was renewed after many years as soon 

as funds were available from the first issue of $500,000 of the $2,000,000 road-bond fund. 

The work completed to June 30, 1920, consists of 10.4 kilometers of niacadam road, 

16 box culverts from 1 to 6 meters span, and 4 drainpipes 0.80 meter in diameter. 



346 EEPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OP PORTO RICO. 

The total expenditure during the year has been $17,799.61, of which $16,926.01 was 
paid from the $2,000,000 road-bond fund and $873.60 from the general appropriation 
for the construction, maintenance, and repairs of public roads and bridges, fiscal year 
1919-20. 

San Antonio- Martin Pena road. — One of the most important works at present 
undertaken by the department of the interior is the construction of the new highway 
which starts near the San Antonio Bridge on road No. 1, crosses the tracks of the Porto 
Rico Light & Power Co., follows parallel to the American Railroad Co. track as far as 
Congreso Street, then goes more or less parallel to road No. 1, finally converging with 
it at Martin Pena. 

The road as originally projected has a length of 4.2 kilometers and a width of 20 
meters, with the exception of a stretch about 400 linear meters along Conj^eso Street 
where it is only 15 meters wide, a condition that arose from the fact that it would be 
necessary to partly demolish important residences, entailing the expenditure of large 
Bums if it had been decided to give the full width of 20 meters. 

On March 11, 1909, the legislative assembly approved a law appropriating the sum 
of $60,000, for the construction of this road, which sum was so small compared with the 
total estimate of the road, that the matter was taken up again in the legislative of 1918, 
and a law was passed "authorizing the commissioner of the interior to survey and 
expropriate a certain section of land from the construction of a road beginning at San 
Antonio Bridge, municipality of San Juan, and ending at the Martin Pena Bridge, 
which land lies between the railroad and the Military Road, and for other purposes," 
appropriating the sum of $100,000 to carry out this work. 

As soon as funds were available, the survey work was started and brought to com- 
pletion, and the road as finally located follows a line which, starting at the San Antonio 
Bridge, tiu-ns to the south, crossing the tracks of the Porto Rico Railway, Light & 
Power Co., and continues through the zone occupied by the tracks of the American 
Railroad Co. up to the point where it intercepts Congreso Street in Miramar, makes a 
slight turn and follows straight on, crosses Cerra Street into Comandante Cerra Street; 
here it crosses several portions of open country, until it connects with the Military 
Road at its junction with the two roads leading to Camp Las Casas and the suburb 
known as Monteflores. 

It can be easily seen from the description of the location as given above, that use of 
the streets already established has been made as far as possible in order to cause the 
least amount of damage to adjoining property, and also to reduce the cost of purchasing 
the right way, which is one of the most expensive items in the cost of this road. In 
the acquisition of this right of way negotiations were made to obtain same either by 
piu-chase or through donation. 

Out of a total of 82,350 square meters, the area of the right of way necessary for the 
construction of this road, only 24 per cent has been adquired by donation, the rest 
has been bought by this department, the amount of $36,946.35 having been spent so 
far. 

In addition to the sum stated above, $17,815.15 was paid out for damages caused to 
adjoining property, during the construction of this road. 

On account of the nature and location of this road the work of construction hasJjeen 
carried out by administration under the direct supervision of the superintendent of 
public works, with an assistant engineer locally in charge of the work. Owing to the 
prevailing high wages for laborers and as a matter of economy the work of extracting 
stone for the foundation course has been carried out by means of convict labor. 

Up to June 30, 1920, the status of the work was as follows: 1.6 kilometers of road com- 
pletely finished between Miramar and Hipodromo Streets. From here to Europa 
Street all grading has been finished as well as 150 linear meters of macadamized siu:- 
face, bringing up the total of macadamized road completed to 1.8 kilometers. 

On December 12, 1919, a contract was approved for the construction of 1,400 linear 
meters of concrete curb and gutter, amounting to $4,480. Later on, this contract was 
increased by including in same the construction of 26 catch basins bringing up the 
total of the contract to $6,308.51. 

The total amount expended on the construction of this road since construction was 
begun is given below: 

Survey including right of way and indemnity 162,232.20 

Labor and material 81, 665. 40 

Contract 5,667.6ft 

Total 149,576.26 

Out of this total the sum of $128,471.55 corresponds to the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1920. 

La Muda-Guayndbo road. — ^The section La Muda-Guaynabo of the La Muda-Pueblo 
Viejo road stanciB No. 15 on the list of precedence established in 1916 by the economy 



KEPOET OP THE COMMISSIONER OP THE INTEBIOB. 



347 



commission, and on this account was inclined among the roads to be built with the 
second million dollars of the road bond fund of 1916. The construction of the Pueblo 
Viejo-Guaynabo section was carried out by law No. 103, approved by the legislature 
in March, 1913, amounting to $20,000. 

As soon as funds from the second million were available, a contract providing for 
the construction of the La Muda-Guaynabo section was approved on December 29, 
1919, for the amount of $44,002.59. 

Due to the great scarcity of laborers around this district the work of conBtruction 
has progressed slightly, so that to June 30, 1920, only the following worlc had been 
completed: Grading throughout a length of 1.5 kilometers; four pipe culverts of 0.80 
meter in diameter, and the foundation, abutments, and end walls of the 5-meter span 
culvert over Los Muertos Creek. 

The total amount expended on this construction during the current fiscal year is 
$8,570, paid from the $2,000,000 road-bond fund of 1916. 

^ Loiza-Juncos road. — This road was placed No. 16 on the list of precedence estab- 
lished by the economy commission in 1916 and was included among those to be con- 
structed with the second million of the $2,000,000 road-bond fund. 

For this reason, as soon as money was available plans were prepared for the con- 
struction of a portion of this road and on January 24, 1920, a contract amounting to 
$54,692.75 was approved, providing for the construction of 10 kilometers at the Loiza 
end. 

^ The location of this section of road starts at the town of Canovanas, and then proceeds 
directly south toward the Main Divide, utilizing the Hato Puerco municipal road, 
which follows along the western bank of the Canovanas River for a distance of about 
7 kilometers. 

The contract includes, therefore, the improvement of the Hato Puerco municipal 
road for a stretch of 7 kilometers and the construction of some 3 kilometers of new road. 

Owing to the great difficulties in obtaining laborers, on account of the high wages 
paid by the sugar mills for work on the cane fields, and to the lack of building mate- 
rials, the work of construction has proceeded somewhat slowly, so that to June 30, 1920, 
the work completed consisted in 2.3 kilometers of grading, one 2-meter span box 
culvert, and four drainpipes 0.80 meter in diameter. 

The total expended in this construction during the year, paid from the $2,000,000 
road-bond fund, amounts to $11,814.52. 

^ Relocation of two kilometers of road No. ^, Isabela-Aguadilla section. — When this sec- 
tion of road No. 2 was constructed, the approach to the town of Aguadilla was affected 
by means of the old municipal road exisiting between these two towns, which has a 
drop in elevation of 108.75 meters in the 2 kilometers next to Aguadilla, making a 
very steep and difficult grade at this place. 

The department had not been able to eliminate this dangerous and difficult ^ade 
on account of the lack of funds, but as soon as the legislature included the additional 
amount of $7,000 in the appropriation for the construction, maintenance, and repair 
of j^ublic roads and bridges, the survey work was started and the project completed, 
which included the construction of 2 kilometers of road, starting at kilometer 141.1 
and ending at kilometer 143.1 of road No. 2, for the construction of which a contract 
was entered into on May 4, 1920, amounting to $24,799. 

The only work completed to June 30, 1920, was about 50 per cent of the total grad- 
ing and two pipe culverts, with a total expended during the year amounting to $8,577.92, 
paid from the construction, maintenance, and repairs of roads and bridges, fiscal year 
1919-20. 

BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION. 

The bridges completed during the year, the municipalities where they are located, 
and their lengths is given in the following table: 



Name of bridge. 



Locality. 



Span. 



Barcelona 

Inabon 

Rio Grande de Arecibo.. 

Maricao , 

Aguacate , 

Trujillo Alto , 

Las Palmas 

Bucarabones 



Mayaguez. 

Ponce 

Adjuntas.. 
Maricao... 
Yabucoa.. 
Trujillo... 

Moca 

ToaAlta.., 



Total length. 



Meters, 



17 
45 
48 
20 
10 
00 



246 



348 EEPOKT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Barcelona bridge over Yaguez River, road No. 2, Aguadilla- Mayaguez section. — ^The 
earthquake of October 11, 1918, did considerable damage to several bridges and cul- 
verts along the western part of the island. Among the structures which suffered the 
most was the 17-meter single-span steel bridge, known as Barcelona Bridge, over the 
Yaguez River, on the outskirts of Mayaguez, which was shaken from its abutments 
and cast into the river, in such a way as to make it entirely useless. 

The abutments suffered so heavily that it was decided to build a new bridge alto- 
gether and to this end, plans were prepared and on June 22, 1919, a contract was 
approved providing for the construction of this bridge, amounting to $19,528. 

This structure as designed consists of a 17-meter single-span bridge composed of 
five steel-plate girders incased in concrete, carrying a reinforced floor slab 8 inches 
thick. 

On June 30, 1920, the work of construction was entirely completed and the, bridge 
provisionally accepted. 

The total amount expended on this contract during the year is $21,969.14, which 
was paid from a special appropriation created by the legislature on December 12, 1918, 
for the reconstruction of public buildings and other structures damaged by the earth- 
quake. 

Bridge on road No. S, Guayama-Ponce section, Inabon River Bridge. — ^The bridge built 
over the Inabon River on the Guayama-Ponce section of road No. 3, which was fully 
described in last year's report was opened to traffic on October 20, 1919. The total 
cost of the structure, amounting to $34,665.56, was gaid from^a special appropriation 
approved for this construction. 

Bridge on road No. 8, Lares- Adjuntas section, Rio Grande de Arecibo Bridge. — As 
stated in last year's report, a contract was approved on March 31, 1919, amounting 
to $27,190.45, for the construction of a bridge over the Arecibo River. The work 
of construction was carried out by contract and the bridge was opened to traffic on 
March 1, 1920. 

The bridge as constructed has a very pleasing appearance, and on account of the 
fine workmanship displayed by the contractor is without doubt one of the best built 
structures of its kind in our road system. 

The total cost of this bridge, amounting to $35,744.84, was paid from the $2,000,000 
road-bond fund. 

Bridge on road No. 3, Guayama-Ponce section, Descalabrado River Bridge. — ^This is 
the most important bridge which remains to be built on the Guayama-Ponce road, 
and plans are already completed for the construction of a reinforced concrete struc- 
ture 32.5 meters long, for which bids will be shortly called for. » 

Bridge over the Rio Grande de Loiza on road No. 23. — Road No. 23 starts at kilometer 
2 of road No. 3, Rio Piedras-Carolina section, and ends* at the town of Trujillo Alto, 
having a length of 7 kilometers. At about 1 kilometer from the town it crosses the 
Rio Grande de Loiza, which is the most important river in the island. During the 
rainy season floods frequently cut off all traffic on this road, sometimes for a period 
of two and three days. 

This condition made the construction of a bridge at this place a matter of the utmost 
importance, as this is the only outlet to our road system that the town has at present. 
As soon as funds were available, its construction was undertaken and a contract 
approved on June 3, 1919, amounting to $19,500. 

The bridge as designed is a reinforced concrete structure with 9 spans 10 meters 
each, made of steel I beams incased in concrete, carrying a reinforced concrete floor 
slab 8 inches thick. The bridge is provided with a railing made of 2-inch galvanized 
iron pipe. If the bridge had been designed so as to have its floor level above the 
high floods of the Loiza River and its roadway of the standard width, it would have 
been a very expensive structure; for this reason it was designed carrying a narrow 
roadway, at such an elevation that it will be entirely submerged during unusual 
high floods. 

The work of construction was carried out in full accordance with plans and specifi- 
cations and the bridge was finally opened to traffic on March 19, 1920. 

The total amount expended on this contract was $18,097.97, and the total expendi- 
ture during the fiscal year is $18,939.58, which includes all expenses due to inspec- 
tion, and was paid from the general appropriation for the construction, maintenance, 
and repairs of public roads and bridges, fiscal year 1919-20. 

Bridge over Aguacate Creek on road No. 3, Humacao-Yabucoa section. — A contract 
amounting to $7,953.20 was approved on December 29, 1919, which included the 
construction of a single-span, reinforced concrete bridge 10 meters long over Aguacate 
Creek. The structure consists of abutments of plain concrete resting on a wood pile 
foundation, supporting six steel I beams which carry the bridge floor, consisting of a 
6-inch reinforced concrete slab. 







i>^^^^F=* 








SHOWING 


TELEGRAPH 


AND TELEPHONE 


UNES 


IN 


OPERATION 




BY 


INSULAR GOVERNMENT 







TO ACCOMPANY ANNUAL REPORT 
1919 - 1920. 




1474S—20.(To face page 414.) No. 2 



Oversized 
Foldout 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE INTERIOR. 349 

The construction -work was undertaken and carried out rapidly and the bridge was 
opened to traffic on June 1, 1920. 

The total expended on this bridge during the year has been $9,082.54, paid from 
the $2,000,000 road-bond fund. 

Bridge over Maricao River at Las Vegas, Mayaguez-Maricao road. — The section. Las 
Vegas-Maricao, of this road crosses, at the Maricao end, the Maricao River, utilizing 
the same crossing as the old municipal road between Mayaguez and Maricao. This 
old municipal road effected this crossing by means of a wooden bridge with masonry 
abutments, entirely inadequate for an insular highway. It was therefore decided 
to construct a new permanent bridge, utilizing the old abutment on the Las Vegas 
side, which was found to be in good condition. 

The work of construction was started and completed within the specified contract 
time at a cost of $7,305.07. 

The bridge is made of two spans, 7 meters long each, composed of reinforced con- 
crete beams carrying a floor slab 15 centimeters thick. The bridge is provided with 
concrete parapets, and is rated as a first-class construction. 

Bridge over Las Palmas Creek on road No. 8, Aguadillalares section. — One of the cul- 
verts that was badly damaged by the earthquake of October 1918, was the old brick 
arch culvert built by the municipality of Moca before the construction of the insular 
road. This culvert had been utilized by the public using this section of road, since 
its reconstruction several years ago. As frequent repairs had been necessary, it was 
thought expedient to build in its place a single-span, reinforced concrete bridge 6 
meters long, for the construction of which a contract was approved on August 18, 1919, 
amounting to $3,325. The structure as built consists of a reinforced concrete slab 
18 inches thick, supported by plain concrete abutments resting on a wooden pile 
foundation. 

The work was successfully completed at a total cost of $5,248.84, paid from the 
general appropriation for the construction, maintenance, and repairs of public roads 
and bridges, fiscal year 1919-20. 

Bridge over Bucarabones Creek, Bayamon-Toa Alta road. — On the municipal road 

known as Camino Escache, in the municipality of Toa Alta and near the insular 

T oad now under construction there existed an old concrete bridge over Bucarabones 

Creek in such a bad condition that it was thought advisable to build a new bridge, 

so that it would serve the insular highway when constructed. 

Work was undertaken by administration due to the limited funds available. The 
bridge is a single-span structure 10 meters long, using reinforced concrete beams, on 
which a 6-inch reinforced concrete floor slab carrying the roadway, was placed. The 
abutments of plain concrete rest on a gravel foundation. 

The work or construction was satisfactorily completed at a cost of $4,776.22, which 
was paid from the appropriation for the construction, maintenance, and repairs of 
public roads and bridges, fiscal year 1919-20. 

Bridge over the Rio Blanco, Lares- Ad juntas road. — The section of road between the 
Rio Blanco and Garganta Vilella now under construction will not be accessible to 
traffic unless a bridge is built at the point where it crosses the Rio Blanco. It was 
decided therefore to proceed with the construction of a bridge at this place, and for 
this purpose a contract was approved January 3, 1919, amounting to $33,919.50. 

The bridge carries two reinforced concrete arches, 17-meter span each, with abut- 
ments and end walls of monolithic concrete founded directly on rock. 

Work done up to June 30, 1920, comprises the completion of the abutments and 
center pier and the earth fill on the two approaches. The forms for casting the con- 
crete arches are already in place, but on account of nonarrival of the special steel 
reinforcement the work has come practically to a standstill. 

The total amount expended on this bridge during the fiscal year amounts to 
$14,864.70, and was paid from the $2,000,000 road-bond fund. 

Bridge over Achiote Creek on road No. 11, Ciales-Juana Diaz section. — The Villalba- 
Divisoria section of the Ciales-Juana Diaz road, could not be opened to traffic unless a 
bridge over Achiote Creek was constructed, since the ford in use is very dangerous on 
account of its rocky nature. 

As soon as funds were available a contract was entered into on July 23, 1919, 
amounting to $12,626.97, calling for the erection of a 20-meter reinforced concrete 
bridge. 

On account of the lack of building materials the work has not progressed as much 
as it was planned, so that up to June 30, 1920, the abutments and central pier had been 
finished only as high as the elevation of the floor beams. 

The total amount expended during the year on this construction is $5,509.18, and 
was paid from the $2,000,000 road-bond fund. 

14748—20 23 



350 ^ REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Bridge over Maricao River, on Mayaguez- Maricao road, Las Vegns- Maricao section. — 
The Mayaguez-Maricao road crosses the Maricao River at Las Vegas, and in order to 
facilitate traflBc a narrow concrete bridge of the submergible type had been erected 
by private contribution. As this was only a temporary structure, a new permanent 
bridge of standard width was designed and its construction undertaken. A contract 
was approved on April 30, 1920, amounting to $18,514.92, which provides for the con- 
struction of a 30-meter span reinforced concrete bridge. 

The bridge has three 10-meter spans formed by I beams incased in concrete, sup- 
porting a 6-inch reinforced floor slab. The piers and abutments are of plain concrete, 
of monolithic construction, and rest directly on a fine rock bed. 

On June 30, 1920, the piers and abutments were finished, and work had been started 
on the relocation of the road at the two approaches; work on the remaining part of the 
structure has been suspended for the present until the arrival of the steel I beams 
and other reinforcement necessary for its termination. 

The total amount expended on this bridge during the fiscal year is $9,641.70, and 
was j)aid from the $2,000,000 road -bond fund. 

Bridge over Rio Grande de Jayuya, road No. 15, Alto Bandera- Jay uy a section. — 
The Rio Grande de Jayuya crosses tl^iB section of road between kilometers 17 and 18, 
and very often during the rainy season traffic is interrupted, cutting off the town of 
Jayuya from all outside communication. 

The construction of a bridge at this place was therefore of great importance, and 
funds being available a project was prepared, and a contract approved on February 3, 
1920, amounting to $12,503.70, to carry out this construction. 

The work was started and has progressed rather slowly on account of lack of mate- 
rials. On June 30, 1920, the work finished consisted in the construction of the piers 
and abutments. The amount spent during the year on this bridge is $4,314.92, 
which has been paid from the general appropriation for the construction, mainte- 
nance, and repairs of public roads and bridges, fiscal year 1919-20. 

The municipality of Jayuya has contributed the sum of $3,500 to help in carrying 
out the construction of this bridge. 

Bridge over Cibuco River, on road No. 20, Corozal- Morovis section. — The Corozal- 
Morovis section of this road crosses the Cibuco River at about kilometer 2. As the 
banks of this river are very steep, the road can not be used until a bridge is built 
at this place. To avoid this a project was prepared, and a contract approved on 
April 26, 1920, amounting to $13,353.42, which included the construction of a rein- 
forced concrete bridge 20 meters long. 

The bridge as designed consists of two spans 10 meters long each, formed by 
five reinforced concrete beams carrying a 6-inch floor slab. The foundations of the 
center pier and abutments have been finished, but work is now suspended for lack 
of cement and reinforcement. 

The total amount expended during the year on this contract is $2,944.42, and was 
paid from the $2,000,000 road bond fund. 

Small landing piers at Mayaguez and Ponce Harbors. — In addition to the construction 
work described above, the bureau of public works took charge of the construction of 
small passenger landing piers at Mayaguez and Ponce Harbors. 

On April 17, 1920, a contract was approved for the construction of the Mayaguez 
landing pier amounting to $8,005.10, and up to June 30, 1920, about 25 per cent of the 
total work of construction had been finished and $2,303.72 certified to the contractor. 

On May 4, 1920, a contract was approved for the construction of the Ponce pier 
amounting to $4,952.44. On June 30, 1920, the only work done was the driving of a 
few concrete piles for the foundation, the amount paid to the contractor being only 
$1,242.81. 

Reconstruction of pier at Vieques. — For the first time the legislature at its last session 
appropriated funds for the maintenance and reconstruction of harbor structures, and 

f)lans were prepared for the execution of the necessary work to the small Vieques 
anding, which had been partly destroyed by action of the sea. 

An estimate amounting to $1,950, was prepared for the reconstruction of this struc- 
ture and work was started by administration due to the nature of the repairs. As a 
matter of economy, convict labor was used in this work, so that same was completed 
at a total expenditure of only $1,310.48. 

The total amount expended in the reconstruction of harbor structures, outside of 
San Juan Harbor, which have been under the control of this division, amounts to 
$4,857.01, paid from appropriation for the maintenance and reconstruction of govern- 
ment harbor structures, fiscal year 1919-20. 

The attached table shows the amount expended from the $2,000,000 bond issue 
prior to and during the past fiscal year on surveys and construction of the various 
roads and bridges: 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIOl^ER OF THE INTERIOR. 

Expenditures from road bond fund of %2 ,000 ,000 , act of 1916. . 



351 



Roads and bridges. 



Lares-Ad juntas 

Ciales-Juana Diaz 

Corozal-Barros 

Utuado-Lares 

Mayaguez-Maricao 

Yaiico-I.ares 

Arecibo-Lares 

Maricao-Indiera 

Guayanes Rivei- Bridge 

Ingenio and Cortadera 
Bridges 

Yabiicoa River Bridge 

Bridge over Aguacate Creek. 

Bridges over Quebradas* 
Ceiba, Emajagua and Vuel- 
tas 

Naguabo-Ceiba Bridges. 

Vieques Road 

Loiza-J uncos 

Comerio-Cidra 

La Muda-GuajTiabo 

Naguabo-Juncos 

Corozal-Morovis . 

San Sebastian-l>as Marias 

Barros-Jayuya. 

Purchase and repairs of sur- 
veying instruments 



Survey. 



118,943.97 
11,943.97 
12,924.20 
2, 837. 23 
5, 979. 62 
4,392.33 

580. or 

2,402.5' 



Construc- 
tion. 



$30,469.98 
32, 181. 37 
55, 142. 95 



19,377.35 
29, 802. 58 
63,556.88 



7,011.98 

8,432.3' 
390.2' 



16,469.00 



1918-19 



Survey. 



$9,083.42 
2,448.37 
1,003.77 



217.02 
5,467.03 

377. 69 
1, 169. 41 



Construc- 

tlDH. 



$67, 271. 49 
56,631.05 
16, 148. 87 



20,678.33 
50, 225. 38 
74,428.17 



3, 242. 18 
22,346.94 




Survey. 



$7,736.58 
9,988.08 



4, 060. 74 
279. 44 

1,313.10 
173.60 
140. 58 



Construc- 
tion /I 



$138, 074. 19 
75,640."" 
29,563.12 



37, 225. 43 
55, 138. 72 
40, 587. 14 
16,328.73 



55.56! 9,082.54 



Total. 



$271,579.63 
188, 824. 31 
114,782.91 
6, 897. 97 
83,757.19 
146,339.14 
179,703.56 
20,041.29 
24,908.53 

11,674.55 
22,737.21 
9, 138. 10 



Statement showing the number of kilometers of road built up to the year 1920, the approxi- 
mate total cost, and the average cost per kilometer. 





Kilometers of roads built. 


Approxi- 
mate cost. 


Average 


Year. 


State 
roads. 


Provin- 
cial roads. 


Total. 


cost per 
kilometer. 


Spanish Government: 

Previous to 1871 


48 
38 
58 
32 

} - 




48 
49 
63 
44 

50 
13 






1874-1878 


11 

5 

12 

23 
13 






187^1883 






1884-1888 


$3,484,627 


"lis* 720 


1889-1893 


1894 1898 




American Governent, insular roads: 

1898-99 






1899-1903 


297 
325 
188 
112 
41 
29 


297 


1 77.f; /ISR 


5,727 
4,663 
7,338 
11,610 
10,050 
11,650 


1904-1908 




325 1 i,' sis', 637 
188 1 ^'70 Aoi 


1909-1913 




1914-1918 « 




112 
41 
29 


1,300,239 
412,076 
337,864 


1918-19 




1919-20 








Total 


1, 195 


64 


1,259 


10,205,523 


9,251 





This statement does not include the section of road under construction between the San Antonio and 
Martin Pena Bridges, which, in the portion already built, has an average cost of $40,830 per kilometer. 
This high cost per kilometer is due to the fact that this road is located entirely within an urban zone, has 
a special width, and other features not found in the standard insular roads. 



352 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

Table*shovnng cost per kilometer of road completed during fiscal year 1919-20. 



Road. 



No. 8, Aguadilla-Ad juntas... 
No. 11, Manati-Juana Diaz. . 

No. 16, Yaiico-Lares 

Mayagiiez-Maricao 

No. 10, Toa-Alta Coamo 

San Sebastian-Las Marias. .. 
No. 20, Morovis-Naranjito... 
No. 14, Consumo, road No. 8 
No. 22, Las Cruces-Comerio. 
Vieques Lsland 



TotaL. 



Section. 



Lares-Adjuntas 

Ciales-Juana I -iaz 

Yauco, road No. 8 

Las Vegas-Maricao 

Corozal-Barros 

San Sebastain-Las Marias. 

Corozai-Morovis 

Mar icao, road No . 8 '.. 

Comer io-Cidra 

Mosquito-PIaya Grande... 



Length 
in kilo- 
meters. 



9.2 
G.O 
2.5 
1.6 
2.8 
2.0 
1.5 
1.0 
2.0 



29.4 



Total 
cost. 



$111,880 
60,280 
37,246 
11,165 
30,400 
9,573 
21,000 
16,300 
23,100 
16,920 



337 



Cost per 
kilo- 
meter. 



$12,160 
10, 046 
15,698 

6,978 
10,857 

4,786 
14,000 
16,300 
11,550 
21,150 



123,525 



Average cost per kilometer, $11,650. 

Note.— In this table is not included the section of road between the Sap. Antonio and Martin Pena 
Bridges, which in the part already constructed has an average cost of $40,830 per kilometer. This high 
average is due to the fact that this road runs through an urban zone, and has special width and other fea- 
ures not found on the standard insular highways. 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

Among the many recommendations which would tend to facilitate the means we 
liave at our disposal for carr^dng out the construction of roads and bridges I wish to 
mention only those which are of the greatest importance and can be solved only by 
the legislature. These recommendations are as follows: 

1. The solution of the problem concerning the acquisition of constructing 
materials. 

2. To appropriate the necessary amounts so as to continue without interruption 
the road construction plan of 1916. 

3. To amend joint resolution No. 5 of the legislature approved May 12, 1920, to 
temporarily suspend the construction of certain public works and to provide funds 
to carry them out by the creation of a special fund . 

Regarding recommendation No. 1, I think it advisable to reorganize the bureau 
of supplies, printing, and transportation. The law under which the bureau is now 
managed should be amended so as to increase its buying power in order that its pur- 
poses be not limited to the purchasing of materials as required by the different depart- 
ments from time to time. This inconvenience could be obviated if the bureau of 
supplies, printing, and transportation had at its disposal sufficient working capital to 
acquire such materials as steel, cement, lumber, paint, plumbing fixtures, etc., on a 
large scale and at the same low prices as obtained by local merchants, thus permitting 
the bureau to make prompt delivery of the material required for public works at 
lower prices. In order that the bureau might work under the plan outlined here- 
with, it is necessary that it be allowed an additional working capital of not less than 
$200,000. If the law would have been revised making it possible for the bureau of 
supplies, printing, and transportation to act as a purchasing agent on a large scale, the 
suspension of certain public works which have suddenly developed upon this depart- 
ment lately on account of lack of building materials in the local market would have 
been avoided. 

The second recommendation which refers to the increasing of funds for the construc- 
tion of roads and bridges tends to demonstrate the urgent necessity to augment the 
means at our disposal in order to bring to a completion the road construction plan 
provided in law No. 71, authorizing an issue of bohds of The People of Porto Rico in 
the amount of $2,000,000 for this purpose. This law provided that the construction of 
the different roads be carried out in the order of preference established by the econ- 
omy commission appointed by the legislature to this effect, and provided further that 
the $2,000,000 authorized by this law be expended as far as possible simultaneously 
in all the seven districts in which the island is divided. To carry out this provision 
of the law, sections of road are now under construction all over the island, and there- 
fore a large construction plan is being developed . 

The length of roads completed up to June 30, 1920, and the work unfinished, which 
is being done under several contracts, will entirely exhaust the $2,000,000 appropri- 
ated by law No. 71 of April 13, 1916. 



EEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE INTERIOR. 353 

The average cost per kilometer of road constructed to date is estimated at $12,000; 
based on this average cost it is figured that with the $2,000,000 of the bonds already 
sold we shall be able to finish 166 kilometers of road. 

With the $1,000,000 appropriated by law No. 49 of June 13, 1919, we estimate to 
construct 84 kilometers more, or a total of 250 kilometers of road to be completed with 
the total appropriation of $3,000,000, if labor and cost of construction materials are tha 
same as during the fiscal year just ended. 

The $3,000,000 provided for road construction by laws above mentioned were^ 
assigned to develop a plan comprising 750 kilometers of road, of which, as above- 
stated, 250 kilometers can only be constructed with the money appropriated, there- 
still remaining 500 kilometers lor the construction of which there is not money avail- 
able. Under such conditions, and taking into consideration that the work under 
contract on this date, and the cost of construction of various sections of road for which 
bids are soon to be advertised will consume the $3, 000, 000 appropriated, I believe the 
moment has arrived to request our next legislature for the necessary funds to com- 
plete the road plan, if it is their policy to continue the execution of the plan author- 
ized under act No. 71 of 1916. Otherwise, if this important matter is not taken into 
consideration at the next regular session of the legislature in February, 1921, we will 
have to wait until the year 1923, too late for relief. 

If the present average construction of 40 kilometers per year is kept up, a period of 
about 16 years will be required to bring to completion the plan now under way; but 
probably this is not the intention of our legislature nor the wish of the people; it be- 
comes necessary, therefore, to make an effort to increase by 100 per cent the number 
of kilometers annually constructed, which could only be accomplished by having the 
necessary funds at our disposal. To this end a law should be enacted by the next 
legislature increasing the special road tax now established, so as to allow The People 
of Porto Rico to issue annually bonds amounting to $1,000,000; otherwise it would be 
necessary to limit our scope to the work now under construction and soon stop our 
activities. If the increase of the tax above proposed is deemed to be unwise or 
excessive, then I recommend that the financial condition of our treasury be investi- 
gated at the close of the present fiscal year to see if it is possible to appropriate from 
the general funds in the treasury an amount of at least $500,000 yearly, with the object 
of developing the proposed road building plan on a smaller scale. 

The third recommendation regarding joint resolution No. 5, approved on May 12, 
1920, to temporarily suspend the construction of certain public works and to provide 
funds to carry them out by the creation of a special fund, must be amended for the 
following reasons : 

This joint resolution in its second section provided a fund which is known as Special 
fund for the construction of public works, and shall be formed as follows: 

.1 . Of 50 per cent of the surplus in the insular budget for 1920-21 . 

2, Of the sum of $150,000 which, during the fiscal year 1920-21 and during ensuing 
fiscal years, may l)e transferred to said special fund out of any funds in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, as hereinafter provided. 

3. Of such other sums as the I.egislature of Porto Rico may from time to time appro- 
priate to be covered into said special fund. 

The surplus in the budget for any fiscal year can not be exactly known, since, as 
provided by law, all accounts against the government are kept open until two years 
after the expiration of the fiscal year, and as these surpluses are really indeterminate 
and will depend* largely on the future needs of the different departments, it might 
result that we will have to depend entirely on the $150,000 appropriated yearly for 
the construction of work, approved since the year 1907, the value of which is esti- 
mated at $1,400,000, requiring, therefore, a period of 10 years for its completion. 

Based on this fact, 1 recommend that the law be amended in such a manner that an 
amount of $500,000 be assigned annually instead of $150,000, to create the special 
fund with which to carry out the construction of those works included in a plan that 
the commission created by the joint resolution No. 5, of May 12, 1920, will present. 

SURVEY AND PROJECTS OF NEW ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year the organization in charge of the surve>dng of 
roads and bridges was as follows: 

Office force. — One engineer and two assistants in charge of the general inspection and 
supervision of the work and six draftsmen and one stenographer completed the force 
in the main ofiice. 

Field force — Lares- Adjuvtas road. — One surveying party engaged in the location 
work, in the section between Garganta Vilella, kilometer 54.4, and Plan Bonito, 



354 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

kilometer 59.8, on road No. 8 (Aguadilla-Adjuntas). Another party in the section 
between Rio Yahuecas, kilometer 10, from road No. 6, near Adjuntas,*^and the divide, 
kilometer 14.5, from Adjuntas, between the Limani and Guayo Rivers. 

Ciales-Juana Diaz road. — One party in charge of the location work in the section 
known as Cialitos, kilometer 26.6, and Garganta Vicens, kilometer 32.4, from Manati, 
road No. 11. 

Naguabo- Juncos road, — One party was detailed to take charge of the preliminary 
survey of this road, starting from its origin at Juncos-Las Piedras road, kilometer 14.7, 
toward the place known as Pena Pobre, 11.7 kilometers in length, where the road 
constructed several years ago, from Naguabo to the west, comes to an end. 

La Muda-Guaynaho road. — One party was placed in charge of the preliminary and 
final location of this section of road, 3.9 kilometers in length, from kilometer 21.6 
of road No. 1, to the town of Guaynabo. 

San Sebastian-Las Marias road. — A party was detailed to make the preliminary 
survey of the section between kilometer 6 of this same road, and the town of Las 
Marias, kilometer 15.4. 

Morovis-Corozal road. — A party completing the preliminary survey of the section 
between Carreras River, kilometer 4.8, and the town of Morovis. kilometer 12 of road 
No. 20. 

Comerio-Cidra road. — A party was detailed to finish the location of the section 
between "La Sabana," kilometer 3.2, and the town of Cidra, kilometer 12.4, 

Ceiba-Ensenada road. — A party was engaged in the preliminary survey and final 
location of the section, 4.48 kilometers in length, between Ceiba and Ensenada. 

Utuado-Lares road. — A surveying party was detailed to take charge of the prelim- 
inary survey in the section of the Utuado-Iiares road, between the Arecibo-Utuado 
road, kilometer 50.6, and the place known as Boqueron, 5.6 kilometers in length. 

Bayamon-Toa Alta road. — ^The preliminary survey and final location of the section 
through the place known as Pajaros, between Quebrada ''Escache," kilometer 4.1, 
and the town of Toa Alta, kilometer 10. 

Rio Piedras-Guaynabo road. — Preliminary survey and final location of this section, 
4.8 kilometers in length, passing near the grounds of the insular sanatorium. 

Jayuya-Barros road. — Preliminary survey of the section between the town of Jayuya, 
kilometer 21.6 of road No. 15, and Cialitos, kilometer 26.6 of road No. 11. 

A description of the roads that have been surveyed is given below: 

Lares-Adjuntas road. — Garganta Vilella, kilometer 54.4 to Plan Bonito section, kilo- 
meter 59.8: The location of this portion of road was made by the department several 
years ago, and after comparing this route Avith all other possible ones, it was adopted 
as being the shortest, most economical, and convenient. 

The work consisted, therefore, in the final location of the line, introducing several 
changes along several stretches so as to increase the length of the road in order to 
decrease the maximum grades. With these changes it was possible to take advan- 
tage of less steep ground and so decreasing the amount of earthwork; the final loca- 
tion was completed during October, giving a total length of 5,376.90 meters. The 
complete project was also prepared so that it was possible to call for bids by the middle 
of June. 

Section between the Yahuecas River, kilometer 10 near Adjuntas, and the divide 
between Guayo and Limani Rivers, kilometer 14.5: The original location of the 
section of Lares-Adjuntas road included between the Guayo and Yahuecas Rivers 
started at the Guayo River, then climbing up to the divide l)etween this and the 
Limani River, it followed this divide imtil coming near the Yahuecas River, sud- 
denly dropped down to cross this, following up its right bank. 

After a general inspection of the location of this section of road, which had been 
surveyed in 1915, it was decided that in order to better serve the zone crossed by 
this road certain changes in its final location were a(lvisa})le. 

It was decided, therefore, to follow the Guayo River upstream for a length of 1 
kilometer, then cross the Guayo-Limani divide, descending into the valley of the 
Limani River, follow the same downstream until its junction with the Yahuecas 
River was reached . 

This final location has greatly improved the future road, especiallv as to the general 
layout and the advantages of ha\^ng easier grades, besides providing access to the 
^territory on both sides of the divide. The length of this section as finally located is 
4^ kilometers. 

The final location in the field is finished ; the plotting of the notes and the preparing 
of the plans is under way, the project will soon be ready for advertisement, and the 
construction of this section may proceed without delay. 

Ciales-Juana Diaz road. — During the fiscal year two sections of road have been 
surveyed, one starting from the place on the main divide, kilometer 23 from Juana 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE INTERIOR. 355 

Diaz and reaches the Toro Negro River at kilometer 29. The other section surveyed 
started at kilometer 26 at Cialitos, southward toward Garganta Vicens, kilometer 
32.4 from Manati. 

Ar the survey of the Divisoria-Toro Negro section was completed several years ago, 
a party was engaged to relocate same, taking all necessary topographical data so as 
to prepare the complete project. The section of this road formerly located came to 
an end at the crossing of the Toro Negro River, kilometer 17 from Villalba, an addi- 
tional length of 1 kilometer was then located, following the course of the Toro Negro 
River, in order to reach a point accessible to country roads. Complete plans for 
same are now finished, giving a final length of 6 kilometers of road located and ready 
for construction. 

The project does not include the bridges over Dona Juana Creek and Toro Negro 
River, as their location requires a special investigation of the sites in order to decide 
what type of bridge should be designed as the safest and most economical. 

Cialitos, kilometer 26.6, to Garganta Vicens section, kilometer 32.4: The part)^ in 
charge of this survey was engaged in completing the final location of this section, 
as the preliminary survey was finished some years ago as far as 1 kilometer south of 
Cialitos. Besides finishing the final location, 5 kilometers more were surveyed, 
reaching a place known as Garganta Vicens. 

This location follows the divide between Toro Negro and Cialitos Rivers, taking 
advantage of all low crossings and developing its course within the valley of the Cialitos 
River. This route, being located high on the mountain side saves the building of 
a great number of culverts and drain pipes, but on account of the steepness of the 
land the earthwork will be of some magnitude. 

Naguabo- Juncos road. — This road was formerly surveyed by the Spanish Govern- 
ment, and part of the earthwork was removed. The present location follows the 
route surveyed as far as possible, but as another road now under construction joins 
the towns of Juncos and Canovanas, a general survey of all the region was made to 
decide th6 possibility of locating a common stretch which might be utilized by both 
the Juncos-Naguabo and Juncos-Canovanas sections. A reconnoissance was made, 
starting from kilometer 10 of the Loiza-Juncos road, which rises to the divide of the 
Canovanillas and Juncos Rivers, then crossing the last-mentioned river, in order to 
reach the town of Juncos. Data was also taken to decide on the final location of 
the Naguabo- Juncos portion, and it was found that it was practicable and very advan- 
tageous to have a stretch of this route common to both roads under project. This 
common section will begin at the Juncos-Las Piedras road, at Torres; it crosses the 
Gurabo River, reaching the estate of Mr. Jose Avalo, and hence it branches toward 
the towns of Naguabo and Loiza. 

The Juncos-Nagubo section, 11 kilometers long, has been completely surveyed. 
All field notes have been taken and final plans will soon be ready for commencing 
the work. 

' La Muda Guaynaho road. — This road, 4 kilometers in length, begins at the town of 
Guaynabo, then follows the Blasina Creek after crossing one of its tributaries, Que- 
brada Los Muertos, rising then to the divide between this creek and Quebrada Lajas, 
and finallv connecting with the insular road, Rio Piedras-Caguas section, at kilometer 
21. 

Ceiba-Ensenada Honda road. — This portion of road, 4.3 kilometers long, was of very 
easy location, running through level territory. The plotting of the field notes and the 
preparation of the final plans are under way. . 

This road gives facilities to the transportation of products and merchandise through 
the port of Ensenada to the region of Ceiba. 

San Sebastian-Las Marias road. — A section 3 kilometers in length, beginning at kilo- 
meter 24 from road No. 8, was surveyed in addition to the first stretch, now under 
construction, reported last fiscal year. The party in charge took all field data neces- 
sary so as to be able to include an additional section of 1 kilometer, thus reaching a 
suitable point of easy access to the surrounding territory. As soon as plans were 
ready a contract was let covering the work, and at present this road is under 
construction. 

There remains to be built in this road to bring it to completion the following sec- 
tion: 

Starting at kilometer 7, on the divide between the Sonador and Guasio Rivers, the 
line of survey descends along the valley of the river crossing it, then rising along the 
bank of the Quebrada Cintrona, one of its affluents, it reaches the town of Las Marias, 
at a place known as Pueblo Nuevo. 

A road included in the insular plan of roads from Lares to Las Marias will probably 
join this section at the Guayo River crossing. The bridge at this point will then be 



356 REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF PORTO RICO. 

used by both roads and there will be a common stretch into Las Marias. The portion 
surveyed this year, starts from kilometer 6 and goes to kilometer 15.4. The project 
that is being prepared includes the rest of the road as far as the town of Las Marias. 

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS OF ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

The organization in charge of the maintenance and repairs of our roads was fully 
explained in last year's report. 

During the year just ended the same system of continuous maintenance has been 
followed, there still remaining the 11 districts into which the island has been divided. 
The number of kilometers in each district in charge of an overseer ranges from 90 to 
140, and each district is subdivided into sections of 25 kilometers attended by a fore- 
man who reports directly, to the overseer each section is further subdivided into 
3 or 4 kilometer sections, having a road mender to care for it. 

The following list shows the personnel permanently employed during the year on 
the work of road maintenance, whose salaries are paid from the general appropriation 
for road maintenance. The engineer in charge of the division is paid from the 
general budget for the Bureau of Public Works. 



Office force. 



1 chief clerk. 

2 assistant clerks. 
1 bookkeeper. 

1 requisition clerk. 



1 stenographer. 

2 typewriters. 
2 paymasters. 

1 assistant clerk paymaster. 



Fieldforce, 



8 police foremen. 
12 road-roller drivers. 
405 road menders. 
1 master mason. 
1 master carpenter. 

1 corral boss. 

2 chauffeurs. 



1 general inspector. 
1 master mechanic. 
1 assistant mechanic. 

I storehouse keeper. 

II road overseers. 
8 assistant overseers. 
51 foremen. 

Appropriation for rond maintenance. — The amount appropriated by the legislature 
for tne maintenance and repairs ot insular roads and bridges during the fiscal year just 
ended was $807,000, the same as the previous year, it being provided that out of this 
amount $7,000 should be spent for the relocation of the road near Aguadilla and $40,000 
should be spent on the maintenance of the sections of roadp going through the urban 
zones of the towns. 

The above appropriation was expended as shown in the following distribution- 

Purchase and placini? of stone for repairing macadam $343, 483. 67 

Renewing wearing sirface 3, 989. 05 

General cleaning and removal of landslides 7, 369. 04 

Road-menders' salaries 122, 610. 89 

Purchase of and repairs to machmery and tools 45, 017. 87 

Bridges and culverts 74, 640. 66 

Retaining and protection walls. 1, 747. 02 

Construction and repairs to road houses 10, 014. 35 

Purchase and spreading of asphalt on macadam 39, 493. 1 

Reducing grades and changes of alignments 20, 087. 3K 

Inspection and field supervision 7(), 935. 15 

General exx)enses 23, 757. 74 

Total 769, 145. 82 

This total amount was paid out for services rendered and materials purchased up 
to June 30, 1920. The balance remaining trom this appropriation, amounting to 
$35,854.18, was reserved to meet the cost of completing the bridges over Rio Grande de 
Jayuya and Barcelona at Mayaguez, and also to pay the cost ot materials ordered but 
not yet delivered, and bills pending collection from the bureau of supplies, printings 
and transportation, the purchasing agency oi the insular government. 

WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR. 

Purchase, and placing of stone. — The largest item of expenditure in road maintenance 
is the purchase of broken stone and the resurfacing and reconstruction of the old 
macadams. Up to June 30, 1920, the roads built and under maintenance reached a 



REPOET OF THE COMMISSIONEE OF THE INTEBIOB. 



357 



total of 1,240 kilometers, and according to the reports of the overseers 500 kilometers 
of the total length needed entire resurfacing. The quantity of broken etone asked 
for by the overseei^ and approved by the bureau of public works as necessary for the 
adequate upkeep of the insular roads during the year amounted to 133,408 cubic 
meters, at an estimated cost of $282,756.86, or an average cost of $2.12 per cubic meter. 
The quantity of broken stone purchased, however, could not reach the amount asked 
for, as the funds appropriated for the maintenance of roads were not sufficient to 
cover all the work planned, due to the high cost of materials and high wages, so the 
bureau of public works made arrangements to purchase and use only 126,049 cubic 
meters of broken stone. 

After calling for bids for the furnishing of the above material, proposals were received 
on May 5, 1919, and contracts were awarded for the furnishing of 61,569 cubic meters 
of broken stone, which represents 49 per cent of the total quantity obtained during the 
year. The remaining 64,480 cubic meters were obtained by administration, using 
free and convict laborers and also by means of private agreements or direct purchase 
orders, each amounting to less than $300. The total cost of the 61,569 cubic meters 
furnished by contract amounted to $135,469.15, giving an average of $2.20 per cubic 
meter. The cost of the 64,480 cubic meters of stone furnished by administration was 
$100,708. 88, giving an average of $1.58 per cubic meter. The total quantity of 126,049 
cubic meters cost $236,178.03, resulting in an average cost of $1.88 per cubic meter. 
No overhead expenses nor charges for depreciation of equipment were included in 
the cost of stone furnished by administration. These expenses amount to $0.18 per 
cubic meter, so that che average cost of this stone should be $1.76 per cubic meter. 

The gradual increase from year to year in the cost of stone, due mainly to the increase 
in wages and the cost of transportation, is noteworthy. At present the hire of oxcarts 
for hauling stone varies from $6 to $10 per day. While years ago this item was only 
$2 to $3 per day. In many localities it is practically impossible to obtain any means 
of transportation. The bureau of public works is purchasing rock crushers and motor 
vehicles as means of lowering the present cost of broken stone. 

Average cos. per cubic meter of broken stone furnished 1910-1920. — 1910, $1.20: 1911, 
$1.55: 1912, $1.68; 1913, $1.42: 1914, $1.65; 1915, $1.32; 1916. $1.43: 1917, $1.62; 1918, 
$1.72; 1919, $1.70: 1920, $1.88. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year there were on hand, left over from the preceding 
year, 29,521 cubic meters of stone. This amount, added to the quantity purchased 
during the fi«^cal year, makes a total of 154,521 cubic meters. Of this total, there were 
used in resurfacing and reconstructing the old macadams 127,382.25 cubic meters. 
Last year's record amounted to 126,986 cubic meters. 

Cubic meters of broken stone placed, its cost and average during the years 1910-1920. 



Years. 


Total cubic 
meters 
placed. 


Cost of 
placing. 


Average 

cost of 

placing per 

cubic 

meter. 


Average 
cubic me- 
ters placed 

per kilo- 
meter. 


1910 


69, 449. 00 
67, 4.50. 62 
67, 639. 04 
87,040.17 
104, 297. 20 
85,354.48 
84, 070. 56 
96, 473. 13 
98, 531. 00 
126, 986. 75 
127, 382. 2.5 


$51,914.34 
56, 240. 98 
60,501.76 
69, 307. 77 
87, 934. 65 
75, 117. 97 
65, 686. 61 
78,417.08 
76, 170. 54 
95,366.54 

108, 205. 84 


$0.75 
.83 
.89 
.78^ 
.84 
.88 
.78 
.81 
.77 
.70 
.84 


71 44 


1911 


69 25 


1912 


68 21 


1913 


52 11 


1914 


97 68 


1915 


77 67 


1916 


74.60 


1917 


84 75 


1918 


85 30 


1919 


105.62 


1920 


102 16 







The stone was put in place at an average cost of $0.84 per cubic meter, which repre- 
sents an increase of $0.09 over the cost of this item for the year before. This increase 
is due mainly to the higher wages and the increase in the prices of fuel and lubricants. 
It is believed that this average cost of placing stone in macadams can be greatly 
reduced in the future by a more intensive use of scarifiers for removing the old surfaces. 
The total unit cost of stone purchased and placed was $2.72 per cubic meter, being 27 
cents higher than the cost per cubic meter of the same class of work during the preceding 
year. 

Renewing wearing surfaces. — This item includes small amounts spent on repairs 
made by help furnished to road menders, comprising the spreading of new binder over 



858 REPOBT OF THE GOVERNOB OF PORTO BIOO. 

the road surfaces, filling in depressions and ruts, and the spreading of gravel and 
*'to8ca" screenings over such roads for which no stone for macadams was available. 
The total amount expended on this item during the year was $3,989.05. 

General cleaning and removal of landslides. — No violent storms or heavy showers 
destructive of road surfaces occurred during the year, but during January and Feb- 
ruary, which are generally drought months, there were heavy rains, which contributed 
greatly to the wearing away of the surfaces of those roads over which there was a con- 
siderable vehicular traffic, especially such as were not designed to support the heavy 
traffic during those months on account of the railroad strike which suspended the 
operations of the American railroad lines and augmented the haulage of merchandise 
and sugar cane over our roads. The general cleaning and removing of landslides is 
practically done whenever possible by road menders, and only the cost of that work, 
which had to be rushed to completion with the aid of road-menders' helpers, is charged 
to the above heading. The total amount expended on this item during the year was 
$7,369.04. 

Work accomplished by road menders. — -The second item in point of importance of those 
showTi in the distribution of expenses given amounts to $122,610.89, and covers the 
salaries and expenses of the permanent force of employees designated as road menders. 
This force is in charge of all work of an urgent character, such as the removal of land- 
slides and obstructions in the side ditches, the cleaning of culverts and drainpipes, 
the maintenance of the surface of the macadam, the daily patrolling of the sections 
under their charge, the planting and care of shade trees along the roads, and other 
duties imposed upon them by the head office. 

Purchase and repairs of machinery. — The total expenditure incurred during the year 
in the purchase and repairs of machinery amounted to $45,117.77, divided as follows: 

Purchase of extra parts for rollers, motors, and stone crushers $4, 174. 07 

Purchase of accessones, parts of machinery, and small repairs to machinery and tools 4, 289. 57 

Repairs to 10 rollers 4, 564. 06 

Repairs to 3 stone crushers 2, 183. 98 

Care and transportation of tools and machinery 1, 048. 94 

2 gasoline 8-ton rollers 6, 316. 29 

4 new scarifyinc^ attachments for gasoline rollers 5, 781. 40 

2 portable asphalt heating kettles and 2 dozen hand-pouring pots 1, 517. 60 

3 new portable stone crushers and 1 set of extra jaw faces 5, 538. 01 

7 buggies and 13 horses , 3, 042. 23 

1 gasoline pump 346. 30 

1 block of 4 cylinders for a truck " Hurlburt " 177. 73 

1 Burroughs adding machine 297. 00 

Tools for road menders 5, 840. 59 

Total 45,177.77 

The equipment on hand at the beginning of the fiscal year consisted of 27 road rollers, 
some of which were badly in need of repairs; 3 stationary stone-crushing plants; 4 
portable crushers; 12 sprinkling wagons; and 1 motor truck. Our supply of tools was 
rather limited and work was somewhat delayed on account of the lack of picks, shovels, 
etc. The department must have more equipment in order to meet the requirements 
of^the works under maintenance. 

^ Construction and repairs of bridges and culverts. — Notwithstanding the fact that there 
are on the insular roads a total of 3,851 structures, a large number of river and steam 
crossings are still unprovided with bridges and culverts. A total of about 765 old 
wooden and brick culverts are so badly deteriorated that they have to be entirely 
reconstructed, but as the funds appropriated yearly for road maintenance are so 
limited, only the very urgent repairs to culverts are attended to. 

During the year just ended the amount of $29,007.79 was expended on the construc- 
tion of entirely new structures and $45,632.87 in repairing old bridges and culverts. 
This work was done by contract and administration, as shown in the following list: 

Bridges built by contract, showing the amounts expended during the year. 

Reinforced concrete bridge with 9 spans, 10 meters each, over Rio Grande de Loiza, on road No. 

23, Rio Piedras-Trujillo Alto, at kilometer 7 $18, 939. 58 

Las Palmas Bridge of 6-meter span over Quebrada Lassalle at kilometer 14.7 of road No. 8, A gua- 

dilla-Lares, built of reinforced concrete 5, 248. 84 

Jayuya River bridge, made of 3 reinforced concrete spans 40 meters in total, at kilometer 17.6, 

road No. 15, AJto Bandera-Jayuya section 4,314. 92 

Total 2S,503.34 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE INTERIOR. 359 

Structures built or reconstructed by administration work, 

Bucarabones Bridge, of 10-meter span built of reinforced concrete, between kilometers 4 and 5, 
Bayaraon-Toa Alta Road > $4, 776. 22 

Reinforced concrete bridge over Quebrada Trigo. This work was started during the fiscal year 
191^19 - 1,524.18 

Bairoa Bridge and aqueducts on road No. 1, kilometers 33.4 and 38.8. The wooden floor sub- 
stituted by concrete slabs at a total cost of 2, 110. 40 

Dajao River on road No. 9 at kilometer 12.2 Bayamon-Comerio section, of 12-meter spans. A 
reinforced concrete slab was constructed in place of the old wooden floor at a cost of 2, 671. 09 

Culvert built at kilometer 89.4 on road No. 2, Mayaguez-San German section. This culvert is of 
3 meters span made of reinforced concrete, at a cost of 1, 181. 29 

Bridge of 4-meter span on the Santa Isabel-Ponce section, kilometer 185, road No. 3, built of 
reinforced concrete at a cost of 1, 129. 28 

Bridge known as Paso Real, on road No. 2, Manati-Barceloneta section, at kilometer 59.2. This 
wooden bridge of 56-meter span was entirely reconstructed with same material at a cost of. . . 2, 401. 99 

Reconstruction of LaVega Bridge, over Cibuco River at kilometer 41.2, on road No. 2, Vega 
Alta-Vega Baja section. This old bridge consisted of a plate girder, 20-meter span, built under 
the Spanish administration. The effects of age and traffic had caused considerable deteriora- 
tion in the structure. The trusses were reinforced and covered with concrete and the floor 
was replaced by a reinforced concrete slab at a total cost of 7, 466. 81 

Punta Santiago River Bridge, on road No. 3, section Naguabo-Humacao Playa, at kilometer 
74.8. This wooden structure of 38-meter span was reconstructed with the same material at a 
cost of 1,179.75 

Wooden bridge over Cano Boca, on road No. 3, at kilometer 72.3. The floor of this wooden 
bridge was reconstructed with the same material, at a cost of 1,061. 07 

Guava River Bridge, at kilometer 120.7, on road No. 1, Juana Diaz- Ponce section, construction 
of handrails and repairs to the arches, at a cost of 749. 12 

Bridge over Quebrada Algarrobo, on road No. 3, Arroyo-Guayama section. The reconstruction 
of this metallic frame of 16-meter span and its wooden floor was done at a total cost of 746. 07 

Repairs to the floors of the wooden bridges at kilometer 87.3 of 15-meter span, at kilometer 84.4 
or 3 meters, on road No. 3, Humacao-Yabucoa, cost 554. 25 

Repairsof24-meterspanof wooden bridge known as "Fraile," on road No. 2, Santurce-Baya- 
mon, at kilometer 3.3, cost 566. 15 

Bascula bridge over Cano Martin Pena, on the Santurce-Bayamon section, road No. 2, at kilo- 
meter 1.6. The floor of this wooden bridge of 92 meters span was repaired at a cost of 423. 53 

Mata de Platano Bridge over Manati River, at kilometer 9.7, on road No. 11, Ciales-Manati sec- 
tion. This bridge consists of one si